United in Song: Celebrating the Resilience of America

FULL EPISODE

United in Song: Celebrating the Resilience of America

Join us for an evening of powerful performances to unite and celebrate our country, affirming our commitment to come together as Americans through the arts.

AIRED: December 31, 2020 | 1:23:15
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome Patti LaBelle.

("Lady Marmalade").

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Hey siser, go sister. ♪

♪ Soul sister, go sister.

♪ Hey sister, go sister. Soul sister, go sister. ♪

LaBELLE: Hey ya'll

♪ He met Marmalade, down in Old New Orleans. ♪

♪ Struttin' her stuff on the street. ♪

♪ She said "Hello, hey Joe,you wanna give it a go?" ♪

♪ Yeah

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya da-da. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Da-da-da-da

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya here. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Creole Lady Marmalade. ♪

♪ Well, well, well.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ♪

♪ BOTH: Ce Soir?

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Well

♪ He sat in her boudoir while she freshened up. ♪

♪ The boy drank all the magnolia-wine. ♪

♪ On the black satin sheets, where he started to freak. ♪

♪ When she said...

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya da-da. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Da-da-da-da da-da-da. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya here. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Creole Lady Marmalade. ♪

♪ Well, well, well, well.

Sing ya'll.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Yea.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Well, well

♪ oooooo, oooo, ah. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Marmalade.

♪ LaBELLE: Marmalade.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Marmalade.

♪ LaBELLE: Ahhhhhhhh

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Marmalade

♪ More

♪ LaBELLE: Yeah.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: More

♪ LaBELLE: Yeah.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: More.

♪ Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir? ♪

LaBELLE: Go ahead ya'll

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Oh da-da-da da-da-da ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ♪

LaBELLE: Ce soir, come on.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

LaBELLE: Don't be afraid to move honey.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya da-da. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Ahhhh!

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya here. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Mocha-cho-co-late ya-ya. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Ooooooo. ♪

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Get ya get ya ya-ya here. ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Da-da-da-da-da

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir? ♪

LaBELLE: Hey

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Ah now.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Ah.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Voulez-vous coucher avec moi? ♪

♪ LaBELLE: Oooooooh

♪ Ooooooooooo

♪ Yeaaaaaaaaah ♪

♪ Yeaaaaaaaah

♪ Ooooooooooh

♪ Ahhhhhhh, oooh, ooooh, ooo-oo, yeah. ♪

♪ Ah. ♪

Hey! Oh, my we're gonna have fun tonight.

NARRATOR: From George Washington's

Mount Vernon, it's

"United In Song: Celebrating the Resilience of America."

Tonight, we come together to ring in the New Year

and celebrate the unifying power of the arts,

and our country's strength

and resilience with performances

and appearances by:

Jamie Barton,

Joshua Bell,

Renée Fleming,

Denyce Graves,

Josh Groban,

Soloman Howard,

Morgan James,

Juanes,

Patti LaBelle,

Yo-Yo Ma,

Audra McDonald,

Brian Stokes Mitchell,

Anna Deavere Smith,

and Jean-Yves Thibaudet

with special performances by the

American Pops Orchestra,

conducted by Maestro Luke Frazier,

and from the John F. KennedyCenter for the Performing Arts,

the National Symphony Orchestra,

conducted by Maestro JoAnn Falletta.

♪ ANNOUNCER: This program

ANNOUNER: Please welcome worldrenowned soprano, Renée Fleming.

FLEMING: Good evening!

And happy almostNew Year's!

So why are we gatheredhere at

Mount Vernon on NewYear's Eve?

This past year has been

nothing short of tumultuous.

We've weathered serious difficulties as a country,

the COVID-19 pandemic and its devastation of lives

and livelihoods, multiple climate disasters,

continued racial inequality,

and frustration over social injustice.

Regardless of who we are as individuals,

we've experienced this unprecedented year together.

So what does this special location say to us tonight?

For almost 250 years Mount Vernon has been a

touchstone of US identity.

It is the home of our nation's first hero,

General George Washington.

As he was giving back his commission at the

end of the war,

George Washington challenged us by reminding us

that we were no longer ruled by kings.

We no longer answered to inherited power.

The people would be solely responsible for

their own destiny.

And if they were not completely happy,

the fault would be entirely their own.

He challenged this new United States of America to

ponder how they would shape the generations to come.

He encouraged his contemporariesto find their shared humanity,

as opposed to what made them different.

He encouraged tolerance and unity.

It is with this hope that we are here tonight,

in this place, steeped in such history.

Music and all of the arts, challenge, inspire,

and connect us to each other, through what is most beautiful

and profound in our culture.

The arts define us as a civilization.

So tonight we come together to celebrate what it means

to be American, to share incredible music,

extraordinary artists and the profound history

that shapes this great land.

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome Broadway star and

recording artist, Morgan James.

("Travelin' Thru").

♪ JAMES: Mm-hm, mm-hm, mm-hm, mm-mm-mm ♪

♪ Mm-hm, mm-hm, mm-hm, mm-mm-mm ♪

♪ Well I can't tell you where I'm going, ♪

♪ I'm not sure of where I've been. ♪

♪ But I know I must keep travelin' ♪

♪ till my road comes to an end. ♪

♪ I'm out here on my journey,

♪ trying to make the most of it. ♪

♪ I'm a puzzle, ♪

♪ I must figure out where all my pieces fit. ♪

♪ Like a poor wayfaring stranger ♪

♪ that they speak about in song ♪

♪ I'm just a weary pilgrim

♪ trying to find my own way home. ♪

♪ Where that is no one can tell me, ♪

♪ am I doomed to ever roam?

♪ I'm just travelin',

♪ travelin', travelin'

♪ I'm just travelin' on.

♪ Questions I have many, answers but a few. ♪

♪ But I'm here to learn,

♪ the spirit burns to learn the greater truth. ♪

♪ We've all been crucified andthey nailed Jesus to the tree. ♪

♪ But when I'm born again ♪

♪ you're gonna see a change in me. ♪

♪ God made me for a reason and nothin' is in vain. ♪

♪ Redemption comes in manyshapes and many kinds of pain. ♪

♪ Oh sweet Jesus if your listenin' ♪

♪ Keep me ever close to you.

♪ As I'm stumblin', tumblin', wonderin', ♪

♪ as I'm travelin' thru.

♪ Well sometimes the road gets rugged, ♪

♪ and it's hard to travel on.

♪ But holdin' to each other,

♪ we don't have to go alone.

♪ When everything is broken,

♪ we can mend it if we try.

♪ We can make a world of difference, ♪

♪ if we want to we even fly.

♪ Oh, goodnight all you children, ♪

♪ goodnight you handsome men.

♪ Farewell to all you ladies

♪ and to all who knew me when.

♪ And I hope to see you down the road, ♪

♪ you meant more than I knew.

♪ As I'm travelin', travelin', travelin', ♪

♪ I'm just travelin' thru.

♪ I'm just travelin', travelin', travelin'. ♪

♪ I'm just travelin'.

♪ Driftin' like a floatin'boat and roamin' on the wind. ♪

♪ Oh give me some direction Lord. ♪

♪ Let me lean on you as I'm travelin', ♪

♪ as I'm travelin' thru. ♪

♪ Like a poor wayfaring stranger ♪

♪ that they speak about in song. ♪

♪ I'm just a weary pilgrim

♪ trying to find my own way home. ♪

♪ Oh sweet Jesus if you're out there ♪

♪ keep me ever close to you.

♪ As I'm travelin', travelin', travelin', ♪

♪ as I'm travelin' thru. ♪

(applause)

(Thibaudet piano solo)

RUBENSTEIN: How far away from

your body can that

Stradivarius go?

I mean, you can't let it out of

your sight very much, right?

BELL: Actually it's the

exact inverse of the pandemic,

I have to be within six feet

of my violin at all times.

RUBENSTEIN: You got COVID-19, is that right?

MITCHELL: Yes, I did.

DAVID: And you are over it now?

MITCHELL: Yeah, that was early on, actually.

That was late February, early March when I got it.

THIBAUDET: Yesterday was my first trip,

to come to Washington after almost 7 months now.

MITCHELL: Well, at seven o'clock every night,

New Yorkers spontaneously started celebrating

the emergency workers in New York City.

And then I was at the window one night,

and I thought 'I think I can actually sing,

you know, full out'

and I just started spontaneously singing.

And uh, the crowd on the street,

which was smallish at that point, they went crazy!

And then the crowds started getting bigger and bigger,

and then I started getting international news coverage.

DAVID: What have you been doingsince the pandemic came about?

JAMES: Prior to COVID-19,I toured full-time for a living,

so it was quite a change of pace.

BELL: I've used the opportunity really for myself

to practice things that Inever got a chance to practice.

JUANES: I am having, writing music a lot for my new albums.

And I am having spend so muchtime with my kids and wife that

normally in the past that time I would have that time

because I could be traveling.

JAMES: Again, I just count myself very lucky that I'm one

of the only artists that I know that has been able

to maintain some creativity and autonomy during this time.

I'm responsible for a lot of people when I travel.

I'm responsible for the band,

I'm responsible for my crew.

So I have to know that I can in

good conscience take them and be healthy.

I'm hoping six months,

but I'm going to continue to do virtual events

and write and do things Ican do in the studio until then.

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome world-renowned violinist,

Joshua Bell.

(applause)

("Bailando En La Oscuridad").

♪ JUANES: Despierto en la noche. ♪

♪ Roto sin nada que decir.

♪ Y luego en la mañana. ♪

♪ Me siento igual no puedo seguir. ♪

♪ Estoy tan cansado.

♪ Tan cansado y hastiado de mi. ♪

♪ A mi lado, necesito algo más de ti. ♪

♪ No prende el fuego.

♪ No prende el fuego sin voluntad. ♪

♪ Deja el misterio.

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪

♪ Siempre las mismas señales. ♪

♪ La radio suena en mi habitación. ♪

♪ Me miro en el Espejo.

♪ Quiero cambiar mi nombre mi corazón. ♪

♪ Voy a ninguna parte.

♪ Estoy viviendo una miseria aquí. ♪

♪ Tan solo quiero encontrarte. ♪

♪ Para poder revivir.

♪ No prende el fuego.

♪ No prende el fuego sin voluntad. ♪

♪ Deja tu ego.

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪

♪ El tiempo nunca perdona.

♪ Parece broma no puedes huir. ♪

♪ El mundo de desmorona. ♪

♪ Y yo sigo detrás de ti.

♪ El ruido de las calles. ♪

♪ Repite tu nombre sin parar.

♪ Dicen que amar quita el hambre. ♪

♪ Que esperas si estas a punto de reaccionar. ♪

♪ Sigo sin encontrarme.

♪ Escribiendo este libro que no tiene fin. ♪

♪ Necesito buscarte. ♪

♪ Dame una mirada que me haga sentir. ♪

♪ No prende el fuego. ♪

♪ Si no hay fuerza de voluntad. ♪

♪ Ni un hasta luego.

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪

♪ No prende el fuego. ♪

♪ Preocupado y sin claridad.

♪ Olvida el ego.

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪

♪ Y bailemos aquí en la oscuridad. ♪♪

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome Broadway's leading man and

two-time Tony Award-winner, Brian Stokes Mitchell.

("Make Them Hear You").

♪ MITCHELL: Go out and tell our story. ♪

♪ Let it echo far and wide.

♪ Make them hear you,

♪ make them hear you.

♪ How justice was our battle,

♪ and how justice was denied. ♪

♪ Make them hear you, make them hear you. ♪

♪ And say to those who blame us ♪

♪ for the way we chose to fight. ♪

♪ That sometimes there are battles ♪

♪ that are more than black or white. ♪

♪ And I could not put down my sword ♪

♪ when justice was my right.

♪ Make them hear you. ♪

♪ Go out and tell our story.

♪ To your daughters and your sons. ♪

♪ Make them hear you, ♪

♪ make them hear you.

♪ And tell them,

♪ "In our struggle, we were not the only ones." ♪

♪ Make them hear you, ♪

♪ make them hear you.

♪ Your sword can be a sermon ♪

♪ or the power of the pen.

♪ Teach every child to raise

♪ his voice and then my brothers, then. ♪

♪ Will justice be demanded by

♪ ten million righteous men.

♪ Make them hear you.

♪ When they hear you.

♪ I'll be near you again.

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Make them hear you. ♪

♪ Make them hear you.

♪ Make them hear you.

(applause)

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome back, the incomparable,

Renée Fleming.

("How Can I Keep From Singing").

♪ FLEMING: Oooooh

♪ Oooooo-ooooo-ooooh

♪ My life goes on in endless song ♪

♪ above earth's lamentations.

♪ I hear the sweet though far-off hymn ♪

♪ that hails a new creation.

♪ Through all the tumult and the strife, ♪

♪ I hear the music ringing.

♪ It sounds an echo in my soul. ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ While tho' the tempest loudly roars, ♪

♪ I hear the truth,

♪ it shields me.

♪ What tho' the darkness 'round me close, ♪

♪ songs in the night will heal me. ♪

♪ No storm can shake my inmost calm, ♪

♪ while to that rock I'm clinging. ♪

♪ Since love rules over heav'n and earth. ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ BACKGROUND VOCALS: Whentyrants tremble in their fear. ♪

♪ And hear their death knell ringing. ♪

♪ When friends rejoice both far and near. ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ In prison cell and dungeon vile. ♪

♪ Our thoughts to them are winging. ♪

♪ When friends by shame are undefiled. ♪

♪ FLEMING: How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ Singing?

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ I lift my eyes the cloud grows thin. ♪

♪ I see the blue above it.

♪ And day by day its pathway smooths. ♪

♪ Since first I learned to love it. ♪

♪ No storm can shake my inmost calm. ♪

♪ While to that rock I'm clinging. ♪

♪ Since love rules over heav'n and earth. ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ How can I keep from singing? ♪

♪ How can I keep

♪ from singing?

♪ BACKUP VOCALS: Sing ♪

(applause)

RUBENSTEIN: So what was it that made you decide you

wanted to participate in this event?

GRAVES: Who wouldn't participate in this event?

THIBAUDET: We were going todo it in July with an audience,

and when I got the call thatwe were trying to reschedule and

do it differently, I thoughtthat was the most amazing idea,

and I said I really want to make that happen.

HOWARD: For me, it's alwaysimportant to come back home and

to do something in the city that gave you your career,

or at least gave me my life and my career.

MITCHELL: People need art!

RUBENSTEIN: And when this event is over,

what do you hope people will take away from it?

GRAVES: I hope that people will feel we are more alike

and have much more in common than we believe.

We know that music of course is a universal language.

Traveling around the worldand meeting people from all

different countries, and sometimes when we couldn't

communicate with each other, when we didn't have the words,

we had music.

JUANES: This year has been tough on everybody,

and celebrating with music and art is such a

powerful weapon of peace.

HOWARD: Just a beautiful experience,

the atmosphere is great.

("Shenandoah").

♪ HOWARD: Oh Shenandoah, I long to hear you. ♪

♪ Away, you rolling river. ♪

♪ Oh, Shenandoah, I long to hear you. ♪

♪ Away, I'm bound away.

♪ 'Cross the wide Missouri.

♪ Oh Shenandoah, I love your daughter. ♪

♪ Away, you rolling river.

♪ She lives across the stormy water. ♪

♪ Away, I'm bound away.

♪ 'Cross the wide Missouri.

♪ Oh Shenandoah, I long to hear you. ♪

♪ Away, you rolling river. ♪

♪ I'm coming home across the water. ♪

♪ Away, I'm bound away.

♪ 'Cross the wide Missouri.

♪ Away you rolling river. ♪♪

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome Broadway's leading lady and

six-time Tony Award-winner, Audra McDonald.

McDONALD: We often hear of the extraordinary efforts

of our founding fathers and their contribution

to establish this country.

But I dare say, women, many, many women,

have shown extraordinary resilience and have blazed

trails never before realized.

Margaret Corbin, the first recognized

American female soldier.

Elizabeth Blackwell, the firstwoman to earn a medical degree.

Harriet Tubman who after fleeing slavery herself,

went on to rescue countless others.

Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross.

Jane Addams, the first American woman to be awarded

a Nobel Peace Prize.

Susan B. Anthony,

Ida B. Wells,

Bessie Coleman, Amelia Earhart,

Marian Anderson, Rosa Parks,

Fannie Lou Hamer, Shirley Chisholm,

Sandra Day O'Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg,

Gloria Steinem, Nancy Pelosi,

Condoleezza Rice, Dr. Mae Jemison,

and the list goes on and on and on.

(applause)

So this uh, this next song is dedicated to these

extraordinary women,

the countless women who have come before us,

and those that have yet to make their mark.

("Climb Ev'ry Mountain").

♪ Climb ev'ry mountain.

♪ Search high and low.

♪ Follow ev'ry byway.

♪ Every path you know.

♪ Climb ev'ry mountain.

♪ Ford ev'ry stream.

♪ Follow ev'ry rainbow.

♪ 'Til you find your dream. ♪

♪ A dream that will needall the love you can give. ♪

♪ Ev'ry day of your life for as long as you live. ♪

♪ Climb ev'ry mountain.

♪ Ford ev'ry stream.

♪ Follow ev'ry rainbow.

♪ 'Til you find your dream.

♪ A dream that will need all the love you can give. ♪

♪ Ev'ry day of your life for as long as you live. ♪

♪ Climb ev'ry mountain.

♪ Ford ev'ry stream.

♪ Follow ev'ry rainbow.

♪ 'Til you find

♪ your dream. ♪

(applause)

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome, mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton.

("Mon Coeur").

♪ BARTON: Ainsi qu'on voit des blés. ♪

♪ les épis onduler.

♪ Sous la brise légère. ♪

♪ Ainsi frémit mon Coeur.

♪ Prêt à se consoler. ♪

♪ A ta voix qui m'est chère. ♪

♪ La flèche est moins rapide. ♪

♪ A porter le trépas. ♪

♪ Que ne l'est ton amante. ♪

♪ à voler dans tes bras. ♪

♪ à voler dans tes bras! ♪

♪ Ah!

♪ Réponds.

♪ Réponds à ma tendresse. ♪

♪ Verse moi.

♪ Verse moi l'ivresse.

♪ Réponds à ma tendresse. ♪

♪ Réponds à ma tendresse! ♪

♪ Ah!

♪ Verse moi.

♪ Verse moi l'ivresse!

♪ Samson!

♪ Samson!

♪ Je t'aime! ♪

("The Impossible Dream").

♪ GROBAN: To dream the impossible dream. ♪

♪ To fight the unbeatable foe.

♪ To bear with unbearable sorrow. ♪

♪ And to run where the brave dare not go. ♪

♪ To right the unrightable wrong. ♪

♪ And to love pure and chaste from afar. ♪

♪ To try when your arms are too weary. ♪

♪ To reach the unreachable star. ♪

♪ This is my quest, to follow that star. ♪

♪ No matter how hopeless,

♪ no matter how far.

♪ To fight for the right, ♪

♪ without question or pause.

♪ To be willing to march,

♪ march into hell for a heavenly cause. ♪

♪ And I know that I'll only be true ♪

♪ to that glorious quest.

♪ And my heart will lay peaceful and calm ♪

♪ when I'm laid to my rest.

♪ And the world will be better for this. ♪

♪ That one man,

♪ scorned and covered with scars. ♪

♪ Still strove,

♪ with his last ounce of courage. ♪

♪ To reach the unreachable,

♪ the unreachable, ♪

♪ the unreachable star.

♪ And I'll always dream the impossible dream. ♪

♪ Yes and I'll reach the unreachable ♪

♪ star ♪

SMITH: More than 90% of the population of Mount Vernon

were slaves, and as Washington could only

emancipate individuals he owned,

fewer than half were freed by his wife,

following the provisions in his last will and testament.

Getting to our more perfect union is not only about the

present and the future, it is about reckoning with the past.

In 1928, the Tomb committee of the

Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union

listed improvements to George Washington's tomb site,

and then included the following,

"The graveyard which wasused by General Washington

for his slaves is unmarked.

In the course of time it is possible all traces of the

graves will disappear.

It is recommended that a simple marker be placed

on this consecrated ground."

And so a simple marker acknowledging the

contributions made by slaves was laid on the site.

But it also took a passionateif not dissenting push from

outside the official activities of Mount Vernon

to advance the project.

Dorothy Gilliam, the first black reporter to have been

hired by "The Washington Post",

visited Mount Vernonin 1982 and came upon the site,

covered in leaves, uncared for, and she wrote,

"An eerie sense of isolation surrounds the place

where an unknown number of Washington's

317 slaves were buried, and the long walk from the

stately tomb of George Washington to

this abandoned memorial seemed drenched

with the tears of the slaves."

As a result of the strength of Ms. Gilliam's writing,

conversations began between black community organizations

and theMount Vernon Ladies Association.

The result: A 1983 competitionbetween architecture students at

Howard University that led to the erecting of this memorial.

This was a constructive pathway beyond honoring the

resting place of slaves,

towards a fuller understanding of life at

Mount Vernon and of George Washington himself.

Mount Vernon leadership has worked extensively with the

descendants of slaves of the Washington and Custis estates.

In the past 7 years Mount Vernonhas undertaken archeological

studies to put a number on the buried.

As of today, 86 graves are accounted for,

40% of which appear to be the graves of children.

Historic sources and archaeologyindicate the graves were

marked by the construction of earthen mounds which was

a grave dressing common acrossdiasporic communities throughout

much of the African-Atlantic.

Mount Vernon historians have curated an exhibition to

showcase the lives of enslaved people.

They seek to respectfully honor those individuals,

and in doing so, to respect and honor a more robust idea

of American history.

("Deep River").

♪ GRAVES: Deep River.

♪ My home is over Jordon.

♪ Deep River, Lord.

♪ I want to cross over into campground. ♪

♪ Oh don't you want to go ♪

♪ to that gospel feast.

♪ That promised land

♪ where all is peace.

♪ Oh Deep River.

♪ Deep River.

♪ My home is over Jordon.

♪ Deep River, Lord.

♪ I want to cross over into campground. ♪

♪ Oh don't you want to go

♪ to that gospel feast.

♪ That promised land

♪ where all is peace.

♪ Oh Deep

RUBENSTEIN: And when you told

your family you were going

to be an opera singer.

GRAVES: That was not

received well.

THIBAUDET: When I was a kid

I always said that what

I wanted to do was be an

ambassador, or be a lawyer,

because I like to talk.

GRAVES: I heard a recording when

I was 14 years old of

Leontyne Price

that changed my life,

and I heard her

sing and I said,

'I want to become an opera

singer like Leontyne Price.

That's what I want to do.'

In my mother's mind,

you go to college to

become a doctor or a lawyer,

you know.

She said,

'What do you mean you're

going to school for singing?

You already know how to sing.'

HOWARD: I worked with

Bobby McFarin and

Wynton Marsalis,

and I saw these two

African-American men

that were equally as gifted

in Jazz, other styles of music,

and classical music.

2008, I decided this is what I want to do because

I saw examples of howit was possible to have a career

in both classical music and still in the other styles.

GRAVES: Um, and it wasn't until I made

my Metropolitan Opera debut,

where my mother organized a bus trip from Washington,

250 people came.

While she didn't understand everything that I was doing,

she appreciated that path, and that struggle,

and that journey to get from where

I started to arriving at the Metropolitan Opera,

so that was something she could completely appreciate.

RUBENSTEIN: I don't know if you knew this,

but George Washington, I'm not making this up,

actually was a big opera fan.

HOWARD: Really?

RUBENSTEIN: And when he wanted to say, give somebody a gift,

he would give them tickets

to a show at the theater,

or to an opera,

and he thought that was a very good kind of gift.

Which it is.

HOWARD: Absolutely.

RUBENSTEIN: So. Thank you so much for doing this,

and thank you so much for this conversation.

GRAVES: It was my pleasure,

I loved it.

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome back,

26-time Grammy and Latin Grammy Award winner, Juanes.

("Para Tu Amor").

♪ JUANES: Para tu amor lo tengo todo. ♪

♪ Desde mi sangre hasta la esencia de mi ser. ♪

♪ Y para tu amor, que es mi Tesoro. ♪

♪ Tengo mi vida toda entera a tus pies. ♪

♪ Y tengo también un corazón. ♪

♪ Que se muere por dar amor. ♪

♪ Y que no conoce el fin.

♪ Un corazón, que late por vos. ♪

♪ Para tu amor no hay despedidas. ♪

♪ Para tu amor, yo solo tengo eternidad. ♪

♪ Y para tu amor, que me ilumina. ♪

♪ Tengo una luna, un arco iris y un clavel. ♪

♪ Y tengo también, un corazón. ♪

♪ Que se muere por dar amor. ♪

♪ Y que no conoce el fin.

♪ Un corazón que late por vos. ♪

♪ Por eso yo te quiero.

♪ Tanto que no sé como explicar. ♪

♪ Lo que siento.

♪ Yo te quiero porque tu dolor, es mi dolor. ♪

♪ Y no hay dudas.

♪ Yo te quiero con el alma y con el corazón. ♪

♪ Te venero.

♪ Hoy y siempre gracias yo te doy. ♪

♪ A ti mi amor, por existir.

♪ Para tu amor lo tengo todo.

♪ Lo tengo todo y lo que no tengo también. ♪

♪ Lo conseguiré. ♪

♪ Para tu amor, que es mi Tesoro. ♪

♪ Tengo mi vida toda entera a tus pies. ♪

♪ Y tengo también, un corazón. ♪

♪ Que se muere por dar amor. ♪

♪ Y que no conoce el fin. ♪

♪ Un corazón, que late por vos. ♪

♪ Por eso yo te quiero.

♪ Tanto que no sé como explicar. ♪

♪ Lo que siento. ♪

♪ Yo te quiero.

♪ Porque tu dolor es mi dolor. ♪

♪ Y no hay dudas.

♪ Yo te quiero.

♪ Con el alma y con el corazón. ♪

♪ Te venero.

♪ Hoy y siempre.

♪ Gracias yo te doy.

♪ A ti mi amor. ♪

Thank you so much.

(applause)

ANNOUNCER: Please welcome back Broadway's Audra McDonald

and Brian Stokes Mitchell.

(applause)

("Wheels of a Dream").

♪ MITCHELL: I see his face.

♪ I hear his heartbeat.

♪ I look in those eyes.

♪ How wise they seem.

♪ Well when he is old enough

♪ I will show him America. ♪

♪ And he will ride on

♪ the Wheels of a Dream.

♪ We'll go down south.

♪ McDONALD: Go down south.

♪ MITCHELL: And see your people ♪

♪ McDONALD: See my folks.

♪ MITCHELL: Won't they take to him. ♪

♪ McDONALD: They'll take to him. ♪

♪ Like cats to cream.

♪ Well we'll travel on from there ♪

♪ McDONALD: California or who knows where. ♪

♪ BOTH: And we will ride

♪ on the Wheels of a Dream.

♪ MITCHELL: Yes the wheels are turning for us girl ♪

♪ and the times are starting to roll. ♪

♪ Any man can get where he wants to, ♪

♪ if he's got some fire in his soul. ♪

♪ We'll see justice Sarah and plenty of men who ♪

♪ will stand up and give us our due. ♪

♪ Oh Sarah it's more than promises, ♪

♪ Sarah it must be true.

♪ A country that lets a man like ♪

♪ me own a car, raise a child, ♪

♪ build a life with you.

♪ With you.

♪ McDONALD: With you. ♪

♪ BOTH: Beyond that road.

♪ Beyond this lifetime. ♪

♪ That car full of hope ♪

♪ will always gleam with ♪

♪ the promise of happiness.

♪ And the freedom he'll live to know. ♪

♪ He'll travel with head held high just ♪

♪ as far as his heart can go. ♪

♪ And he will ride.

♪ Our son will ride.

♪ On the Wheels of a Dream. ♪

(applause)

FLEMING: I hope that this glimpse into our country's

history and artistry can inspire and unite us.

I challenge each of us as we ring in this New Year,

to remember what we share.

McDONALD: There is no quick-fixin this challenging time but

perhaps we can take George Washington's advice to heart.

What things do we as Americans share and hold dear?

How can we build each other up,work harder to unite and be a

source of hope for each other?

FLEMING: Washington himself asked us, "How will we shape

the destiny of generations of Americans yet to come?

For our future and for our children's future,

I choose hope."

McDONALD: To close out this spectacular evening,

please welcome back the incredible Ms. Patti LaBelle.

("Over the Rainbow").

♪ LaBELLE: Somewhere

♪ over the rainbow,

♪ way up high.

♪ There's a, a land that

♪ I've heard of once in a lullaby. ♪

♪ Somewhere

♪ over the rainbow,

♪ bluebirds fly.

♪ If birds fly over,

♪ over the rainbow.

♪ Then why, oh why can't I?

♪ Someday I'll wish upon a star. ♪

♪ And wake up where the clouds are far behind me. ♪

♪ Where troubles melt like lemon drops. ♪

♪ Away above the chimney tops. ♪

♪ That's where,

♪ that's where you will find me. ♪

♪ Somewhere,

♪ over the rainbow,

♪ bluebirds fly.

Yes they do.

♪ If a teeny-weeny bird can fly. ♪

♪ Over the rainbow.

♪ Then why, oh, why,

♪ can't I?

♪ BACKGROUND VOCALS: I've got to get over the rainbow. ♪

♪ I've got to get over the rainbow. ♪

♪ Yeah.

♪ Ooh.

♪ Why, why, why.

♪ Can't I? ♪

(applause)

(music continues playing through credits)


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