NYC-ARTS

S2020 E5 | FULL EPISODE

NYC-ARTS Full Episode: January 30, 2020

Maestro Jaap van Zweden of the New York Philharmonic speaks with Paula Zahn about the deep roots of his love for music and the new season with the orchestra. Followed by a visit to the Nicholas Roerich Museum New York on the Upper West Side.

AIRED: January 30, 2020 | 0:28:16
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

♪♪

>>> COMING UP ON "NYC ARTS," A

CONVERSATION WITH THE MAESTRO OF

THE PHILHARMONIC ABOUT HIS DEEP

ROOTS FOR HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC AND

THE CURRENT SEASON OF THE

ORCHESTRA.

>> EVERYBODY ALWAYS WANTS TO

KNOW, WHERE IS IT COMING FROM?

BUT THAT'S THE MYSTERY OF MUSIC.

I COULD NOT TELL YOU WHY I WAS

JUST MESMERIZED BY A VIOLIN

CONCERTO BY BEETHOVEN.

I CAN SAY IT OPENED MY HEART.

>> AND A VISIT TO THE NICHOLAS

WARWICK MUSEUM.

>> WE HAVE JUST THREE PIECES

FROM HIS RUSSIAN PERIOD WHICH

ENDED IN 1916.

AND ONE OF THEM IS A LOVELY

LITTLE SKETCH FROM 1903 WHICH

SHOWS US HIS BRUSHWORK AND

COMPRESSED COMPOSITION AND FOCUS

ON PHYSICAL NATURE OF PAINT.

>>> FUNDING FOR "NYC ARTS" IS

MADE POSSIBLE BY --

ROSALIND P. WALTER.

THEA PETSCHEK IERVOLINO

FOUNDATION.

THE LEWIS "SONNY" TURNER FUND

FOR DANCE.

JODY AND JOHN ARNHOLD.

ELISE JAFFE AND JEFFREY BROWN.

CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER.

ELROY AND TERRY KRUMHOLZ

FOUNDATION.

JEAN DUBINSKY APPLETON ESTATE.

THE MILTON AND SALLY AVERY ARTS

FOUNDATION.

AND ELLEN AND JAMES S. MARCUS.

THIS PROGRAM IS SUPPORTED IN

PART BY PUBLIC FUNDS FROM THE

NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF

CULTURAL AFFAIRS IN PARTNERSHIP

WITH THE CITY COUNCIL.

ADDITIONAL FUNDING PROVIDED BY

MEMBERS OF THIRTEEN.

"NYC ARTS" IS MADE POSSIBLE IN

PART BY FIRST REPUBLIC BANK.

>> FIRST REPUBLIC BANK PRESENTS

"FIRST THINGS FIRST."

AT FIRST REPUBLIC BANK, FIRST

REFERS TO OUR FIRST PRIORITY.

THE CLIENTS WHO WALK THROUGH OUR

DOORS.

THE FIRST STEP?

RECOGNIZE THAT EVERY CLIENT IS

AN INDIVIDUAL WITH UNIQUE NEEDS.

FIRST DECREE.

BE A BANK WHOSE CURRENCY IS

SERVICE IN THE FORM OF PERSONAL

BANKING.

THIS WAS FIRST REPUBLIC'S

MISSION FROM OUR VERY FIRST DAY.

IT'S STILL THE FIRST THING ON

OUR MINDS.

♪♪

>>> GOOD EVENING AND WELCOME TO

"NYC ARTS."

I'M PAULA ZAHN AT THE TISCH WNET

STUDIOS AT LINCOLN CENTERS.

ONE OF OUR BELOVED NEIGHBORS IS

THE RENOWNED NEW YORK

PHILHARMONIC.

FOUNDED IN NEW YORK CITY IN

1842, IT IS THE OLDEST SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA IN THE UNITED STATES

AND FOR MORE THAN 175 YEARS HAS

PLAYED A LEADING ROLE AROUND THE

WORLD.

LAST SEASON THE PHILHARMONIC

WELCOMED A NEW MUSIC DIRECTOR.

IN HIS INAUGURAL SEASON AT THE

NEW YORK PHIL HE BROUGHT ANNED A

ADVENTUROUS SPIRIT AND MET THE

EXPECTATIONS OF NEW YORK

AUDIENCES.

HE SERVED AS CHIEF CONDUCTOR OF

THE NETHERLANDS RADIO

PHILHARMONIC AND ROYAL FLANDERS

ORCHESTRA.

IT WAS HIS LONG TENURE AS MUSIC

DIRECTOR OF THE DALLAS SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA THAT BROUGHT HIM TO

THE ATTENTION OF AMERICAN

PUBLIC.

THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC SEASON

CONTINUES IN FEBRUARY WITH THE

LAUNCH OF "PROJECT 19."

THE PROJECT COMMISSIONED 19

WORKS BY WOMEN TO CELEBRATE THE

CENTENNIAL OF THE 19th AMENDMENT

WHICH GRANTED, OF COURSE, EQUAL

VOTING RIGHTS.

HE'LL CONDUCT THE PREMIER OF

WORKS BY NINA YOUNG, ELLEN REED,

AND TANYA LYON.

IN APRIL THE PHILHARMONIC

CELEBRATES THE WORKS OF BELOVED

AND REVERED COMPOSER GUSTAV

MAHLER.

LAST WEEK WE HAD A CHANCE TO

SPEAK ABOUT THE DEEP ROOTS OF

HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC AND HIS

CURRENT SEASON WITH THE NEW YORK

PHILHARMONIC.

WELCOME, IT IS SUCH A PLEASURE

TO MEET YOU.

>> NICE TO MEET YOU.

>> I WONDERED WHEN YOU WERE A

YOUNG CHILD, YOU PICKED UP A

VIOLIN FOR THE FIRST TIME, IF

YOU HAD ANY IDEA THAT THIS WAS A

PASSION THAT YOU WOULD PURSUE

FOR YOUR WHOLE LIFE.

>> WELL, YOU KNOW, FIRST THERE

WAS THE PASSION.

AND THEN ALL THE THINGS AFTER

THAT CAME BY NATURE.

AT THE TIME THAT I PICKED UP THE

VIOLIN, IT WAS JUST THE LOVE FOR

THE INSTRUMENT AND THE MUSIC.

IF YOU'D HAVE ASKED ME WHEN I

WAS 7 YEARS OLD AND PLAYING THE

VIOLIN EVERY DAY FOR MANY HOURS

THAT I WOULD END UP BEING A

MUSIC DIRECTOR, AND THEN EVEN

THE MUSIC DIRECTOR OF THE NEW

YORK PHILHARMONIC, THAT WAS NOT

THE PLAN.

THERE WAS NO PLAN, THERE WAS

JUST LOVE FOR MUSIC.

>> WHAT ROLE DID MUSIC PLAY IN

YOUR FAMILY LIFE IN AMSTERDAM?

>> MY FATHER STILL IS A PIANIST.

AND HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING WITH

GYPSY VIOLINISTS.

AND I WOULD BE AT HOME LISTENING

TO THAT, AND I WOULD BE SO

MESMERIZED BY THIS INSTRUMENT,

THE VIOLIN, THAT I JUST ASKED

FOR THE INSTRUMENT TO PLAY IT.

>> IT'S INTERESTING THAT IT

SPOKE TO YOU AT SUCH AN EARLY

AGE, BEFORE YOU EVEN UNDERSTOOD

THESE COMPLICATED EMOTIONS THAT

WE ALL DEAL WITH.

>> AS YOU SEE SOMETIMES YOUNG

CHILDREN, WHEN THEY ARE REALLY

ATTACHED TO MUSIC, TO CLASSICAL

MUSIC OR ANY MUSIC, I WOULD

SAY -- FOR ME, AT LEAST, IT IS A

MEMORY.

EVERYBODY ALWAYS WANTS TO KNOW,

WHERE IS IT COMING FROM?

BUT THAT'S THE MYSTERY, YOU

KNOW, OF MUSIC.

I COULD NOT TELL YOU WHY I WAS

JUST MESMERIZED BY A VIOLIN

CONCERTO BY BEETHOVEN.

I CAN SAY THAT IT OPENED MY

HEART.

BUT THAT'S ALL WE CAN SAY.

AND IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT KIND

OF MUSIC IT IS.

IF YOU HEAR BRUNO MARS OR IF YOU

HEAR LADY GAGA OR YOU HEAR A

BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY, DOESN'T

MATTER.

IF YOU ARE TOUCHED IN YOUR

HEART, THAT IS WHAT IT'S ALL

ABOUT.

♪♪

>> YOU ULTIMATELY TOOK IT VERY

SERIOUSLY, YOU ENDED UP COMING

TO JUILLIARD WHEN YOU WERE JUST

16.

>> YES.

>> WAS THAT AN OVERWHELMING

EXPERIENCE FOR YOU AT THAT AGE,

TO BE IN THIS BIG CITY?

>> I WON A COMPETITION, AND THAT

COMPETITION MADE IT POSSIBLE

THAT I COULD TRAVEL AND I COULD

STUDY FOR ONE SEASON AT

JUILLIARD.

THAT BEGINNING WAS ALSO QUITE

LONELY, TO BE HONEST.

BUT YOU KNOW, IF YOU HAVE YOUR

INSTRUMENT, YOU HAVE YOUR MUSIC,

THAT IS ALREADY A LOT.

>> AND THEN YOU WENT HOME TO

BECOME THE CONCERT MASTER OF THE

CONCERTBAU AT AGE 19 WHAT A

STUNNING ACHIEVEMENT.

>> IT WAS VERY INTENT, AND THAT

WAS A HUGE STEP.

I DID NOT KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT

FROM IT.

BECAUSE I LEARNED THE VIOLIN

CONCERTOS, AND I WAS ONLY

FOCUSED ON ONE INSTRUMENT, AND

THAT WAS THAT VIOLIN.

AND CERTAINLY I WAS PART OF A

HUGE MACHINE WHICH IS CALLED AN

ORCHESTRA.

I WOULD SAY AS A HUMAN BEING I

WAS NOT REALLY READY.

AS A VIOLINIST, 100%.

AS A HUMAN BEING, I COULD HAVE

HAD SOME MORE YEARS IN THE

WORLD.

>> AT SOME POINT YOU AND LEONARD

BERNSTEIN'S PATHS CROSSED.

>> YES.

>> WHAT HAPPENED?

>> WELL, HE CAME TO THE

CONCERTBAU ORCHESTRA, AND HE WAS

CONDUCTING MAHLER SYMPHONIES.

AND SO WE WENT ON TOUR.

AND WE WENT TO A HALL IN BERLIN

WHERE HE ASKED ME IF I COULD

CONDUCT.

>> HAD YOU EVER CONDUCTED

BEFORE?

>> NEVER.

>> WHAT WAS YOUR REACTION WHEN

HE ASKED YOU TO CONDUCT?

>> OH, I WAS SO SCARED.

TO SAY NO TO HIM WAS DANGEROUS.

HE DIDN'T LIKE THAT.

SO I TOLD HIM OF COURSE I WILL

DO IT, BUT DON'T EXPECT ANYTHING

FROM IT.

HE SAID, NO, IT'S FINE, BUT THE

HALL IS REFURBISHED, I WANT TO

HEAR HOW IT SOUNDS NOW.

I ACTUALLY CONDUCTED A LITTLE

BIT.

>> HOW DID YOU DO?

>> NOT GOOD.

BUT HE -- THAT'S ALSO WHAT HE

SAID.

HE SAID, THAT WAS PRETTY BAD.

BUT, HE SAID, YOU SHOULD TAKE IT

SERIOUSLY, BECAUSE I SAW

SOMETHING THERE.

YOU COULD BE SOMEBODY WHO COULD

FEEL VERY AT HOME IN FRONT OF AN

ORCHESTRA.

>> SO BESIDES LEONARD

BERNSTEIN'S INSPIRING YOU TO

BECOME A CONDUCTOR, WHAT WOULD

YOU SAY WAS HIS IMPRINT ON THAT

PART OF YOUR CAREER?

>> HE WAS SOMEBODY WHO WAS

ALWAYS SEARCHING FOR FREEDOM ON

STAGE.

BUT HE LEARNED ME THAT FREEDOM,

YOU DON'T GET, YOU EARN FREEDOM.

AND HOW DO YOU EARN THAT

FREEDOM?

TO BE VERY DISCIPLINED.

YOU KNOW IN A WAY, DISCIPLINE

MAKES YOU VERY FREE ON STAGE.

BECAUSE THEN YOU ARE NOT

BOTHERED BY ANY TECHNICAL

PROBLEM, AND YOU CAN JUST LET

THE ENERGY GO, AND YOU CAN HAVE

JUST THE MUSIC SPEAK FOR ITSELF.

>> WALK ME THROUGH SOME OF THE

MUSICAL SELECTIONS YOU MADE IN

THE FIRST SEASON THAT SOME

PEOPLE AT FIRST BLUSH MIGHT

THINK COULD HAVE BEEN ALIENATING

TO A TRADITIONAL AUDIENCE, BUT

THAT WASN'T THE CASE?

>> THE FIRST PIECE WE DID, THE

OPENING PIECE, WHERE HE WAS ABLE

TO HAVE THE AUDIENCE BE INVOLVED

WITH THE PIECE WHERE MUSICIANS

WOULD BE IN THE AUDIENCE.

SINGERS WHO USED MEGAPHONES.

INSTRUMENTS WHICH HAD NEVER BEEN

USED EVER.

AND ALSO HAVING THE INSTRUMENTS

IN THE ORCHESTRA BEING USED IN A

WAY THAT THEY'VE NEVER BEEN

USED.

MAKING SOUNDS THAT NEVER WAS

PLAYED LIKE THIS IN A CONCERT

HALL.

IT WAS JUST AN AMAZING PIECE

WHICH HE WROTE FOR THE OPENING

OUT OF HER OWN WORLD.

>> YOU'VE MADE A CONCERTED

EFFORT TO BRING MORE FEMALE

COMPOSERS INTO THE MIX.

MANY OF THEM HAVE DESERVED FAR

GREATER RECOGNITION THAN THEY'VE

GOTTEN ALONG THE WAY.

>> I COMPLETELY AGREE WITH YOU.

AND IF YOU JUST SEARCH FOR THE

TALENTS, THEY ARE THERE.

JULIA WOLF, "FIRE IN HER MOUTH,"

THE PIECE WHICH SHE WROTE FOR

US, THIS WAS OF COURSE A

COMPOSITION ABOUT TRAGEDY, WHAT

WAS IN NEW YORK A HUGE FIRE

WHERE SO MANY, SO MANY YOUNG

LADIES LOST THEIR LIVES.

AT THAT TIME ALL THE YOUNG

LADIES WHO WERE WORKING IN THE

FACTORY WERE IMMIGRANTS.

THE AUDIENCE REALLY FELT

CONNECTED WITH THAT TRAGEDY FROM

SO LONG AGO.

JULIA WOLF REALLY DID AN AMAZING

JOB TO BRING ALL THESE FEELINGS

INTO THE MUSIC.

>> IT SOUNDS LIKE AN ADDED

BENEFIT TO COMMISSIONING THIS

KIND OF MUSIC IS TO KEEP THE

PHILHARMONIC RELEVANT.

AND THERE'S A LOT OF DISCUSSION

ALL OVER THE WORLD TODAY HOW YOU

KEEP AUDIENCES COMING TO

CLASSICAL MUSIC CONCERTS.

>> I THINK THE MOST IMPORTANT

THING IS THAT YOU BRING THEMES,

AND BEHIND THESE THEMES THERE

ARE STORIES.

STORIES THAT NEED TO BE TOLD.

THE MOMENT YOU TELL A STORY, IF

IT IS -- IF YOU TELL A STORY TO

A CHILD OF 7 YEARS OLD OR TO A

LADY WHO IS 70 YEARS OLD, NO

DIFFERENCE.

♪♪

>> IT MUST BE VERY EXCITING ALSO

TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY LIKE

YOU'VE HAD TO GO OUT AND NOT

ONLY COMMISSION, BUT TRY TO FIND

19 OF THE BEST FEMALE COMPOSERS

YOU COULD FIND.

TELL ME ABOUT "PROJECT 19" AND

WHAT THAT IS.

>> IN 2019-20, IT IS 100 YEARS

AGO THAT FEMALES HAD -- GOT THE

RIGHT TO VOTE.

SO WE THOUGHT, WHY DON'T WE

INVITE 19 OF THE MOST INSPIRING

FEMALE COMPOSERS IN THE WORLD TO

WRITE A PIECE TO CELEBRATE THAT?

AND WE DO THAT OVER TWO SEASONS.

>> THAT'S FANTASTIC.

AND THEN LATER ON IN THE SEASON

YOU'LL BE EXPLORING THE MUSIC OF

GUSTAV MAHLER.

>> YES.

WE GOT AN INVITATION FROM

AMSTERDAM, ACTUALLY.

EVERY 25 YEARS THEY HAVE A BIG

FESTIVAL CELEBRATING MAHLER.

AND FOR 100 YEARS NOW THEY

INVITED THE BERLIN PHILHARMONIC,

THE VIENNA PHILHARMONIC, AND THE

ROYAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, OF

COURSE.

AND THEY MADE CELEBRATION OF ALL

THE SYMPHONIES BY MAHLER.

IN THE FIRST TIME, MAY 2020, WE

ARE GOING TO AMSTERDAM AND BE

ALSO PART OF THAT REALLY GREAT

MEMBER OF ORCHESTRAS.

♪♪

>> CONGRATULATIONS.

THAT'S GREAT.

IN NEW YORK IN THE SPRING,

YOU'LL BE ALSO EXPLORING THE

VERY INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP YOU

HAD WITH NEW YORK, RIGHT?

>> HE WAS THE MUSIC DIRECTOR OF

THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC.

I WOULD SAY ONE OF THE MOST

FAMOUS ONES, OF COURSE.

AND AT THE SAME TIME HE LIVED

ALSO IN NEW YORK.

TILL ALMOST THE END OF HIS LIFE.

AND WE ARE ACTUALLY CELEBRATING

HIM IN PLAYING THE 1st AND THE

2nd SYMPHONY IN THE UPCOMING

SEASON.

>> WHAT ARE YOU HOPING WILL BE

YOUR MOST IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTION

TO THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC?

>> AS A NEW MUSIC DIRECTOR,

YOU'RE STEPPING IN BIG SHOES.

MAHLER, WE JUST TALKED ABOUT

HIM.

BERNSTEIN.

YOU CAN NAME THEM ALL, ACTUALLY.

AND IT'S A HUGE RESPONSIBILITY.

I COME ON STAGE HERE, I REHEARSE

THE PIECE, AND THEN I HEAR A

TRADITION OF SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE

FORMER MUSIC DIRECTORS WHO

CONDUCTED THESE PIECES.

AND THEN WHAT IS WONDERFUL FOR

ME IS I COME WITH MY OWN

TRADITION, THEY COME WITH THEIR

TRADITION, AND WE MEET IN THE

MIDDLE.

SO A TRADITION IS NOT JUST

SOMETHING WHICH IS THERE AND WE

SHOULD JUST OBEY TO IT.

NO, WE CAN CREATE NEW

TRADITIONS.

AND THAT'S WHAT WE ARE DOING ALL

THE TIME.

AND THAT IS SO FANTASTIC ABOUT

THIS ORCHESTRA.

>> WHAT SETS THE NEW YORK

PHILHARMONIC APART FROM OTHER

SYMPHONIES?

>> I THINK TALENT BY TALENT,

IT'S THE BEST ORCHESTRA IN THE

WORLD.

YOU ASK FOR SOMETHING, AND THEY

DO IT IN A SPLIT-SECOND.

SO IT'S A VERY OPEN ORCHESTRA.

AND YOU KNOW, BECAUSE AFTER 177

YEARS YOU HAVE A HUGE EGO WHICH

IS VERY GOOD.

BECAUSE, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE THE

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC.

AND AT THE SAME TIME YOU HAVE TO

JUST OPEN YOUR DOOR EVERY DAY

AND SAY, OKAY WHAT CAN I LEARN

TODAY?

THIS IS WHAT I THINK.

IF WE GET UP EVERY MORNING AND

WE SAY TO OURSELVES, WHAT CAN I

LEARN TODAY?

THAT MAKES IT WORTH TO GO TO THE

HALL AND REHEARSE.

>> WE SHOULD ALL BE ABLE TO

DEFINE OUR LIVES THAT WAY ON A

DAILY BASIS.

WHAT A WONDERFUL WAY TO LIVE,

LUCKY YOU.

SOUNDS LIKE YOU HAVE A REALLY

GOOD TIME.

>> ABSOLUTELY.

>> WELL, I SALUTE YOU ON SO MANY

DIFFERENT FRONTS.

IT IS SUCH A DELIGHT TO MEET

YOU.

CONTINUED GOOD LUCK WITH ALL OF

THESE WONDERFUL THINGS THAT LIE

AHEAD OF YOU.

>> THANK YOU.

>> THANK YOU.

♪♪

♪♪

>>> THE NICHOLAS ROARIC MUSEUM

ON THE UPPER WEST SIDE IS SOLELY

DEVOTED TO THE WORK OF THIS

RUSSIAN ARTIST.

BORN IN ST. PETERSBURG IN 1874,

HE LIVED SEVERAL YEARS IN NEW

YORK CITY IN THE 1920s.

THEN IN INDIA WHERE HE SPENT HIS

FINAL DAYS.

RORIC WAS A PROLIFIC ARTIST.

AS A PAINTER HE WAS CONSIDERED A

PHILOSOPHER MYSTIC.

WHEN YOU VISIT THE TOWNHOUSE,

HOME TO THE MUSEUM SINCE 1949,

YOU'LL SEE PAINTINGS PRIMARILY

FROM THE ARTIST'S HIMALAYAN

PERIOD, THE PLACE WHERE HE DREW

BOTH ARTISTIC AND SPIRITUAL

INSPIRATION, BECOMING KNOWN AS

THE MASTER OF THE MOUNTAINS.

>> WELCOME TO NICHOLAS RORIC

MUSEUM.

I AM CURATOR OF THE MUSEUM.

IT'S A ONE-ARTIST MUSEUM.

BIG RUSSIAN PAINTER, NICHOLAS

RORIC, WHO LIVED 1874 TO 1947.

IT'S A SO-CALLED FRENCH STYLE OF

DISPLAYING THE PAINTINGS.

THEY ARE ALL OVER THE WALLS, AND

IT'S KIND OF HOME ATMOSPHERE.

YOU ARE WELCOME TO ROAM ABOUT

AND JUST ENJOY THEM.

WE HAVE ABOUT 200 OF THEM, AND

MOSTLY IT'S HIMALAYA PERIOD, SO

THERE ARE LOTS OF MOUNTAINS,

LOTS OF BLUES, LOTS OF WHITES.

AND AS SOME SAY, THERE'S A

REALLY HOME ATMOSPHERE.

HE WAS BORN IN ST. PETERSBURG IN

1874, WHITE A WELL TO DO FAMILY.

THE FAMILY WANTED HIM TO PURSUE

LAW, SO HE MADE A COMPROMISE AND

HE ENROLLED INTO THE DEPARTMENT

OF LAW IN UNIVERSITY, AND THEN

HE WAS ALLOWED TO PURSUE HIS

ARTISTIC INTERESTS, AND HE ALSO

STUDIED IN IMPERIAL ACADEMY OF

ARTS WHICH HE GRADUATED IN 1897.

HE WAS LIKE ANY YOUNG

ENTHUSIASTIC ARTIST WHO WAS

ASPIRING TO CHANGE THE WORLD,

AND HE TRIED TO FIND HIS STYLE

AND HIS PLACE.

AND INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, HE

NEVER LOST THAT ASPIRATION.

WE HAVE JUST THREE PIECES FROM

HIS RUSSIAN PERIOD WHICH ENDED

IN 1916.

AND ONE OF THEM IS A LOVELY

LITTLE SKETCH FROM 1903 WHICH

SHOWS US HIS LOOSE BRUSHWORK AND

COMPRESSED COMPOSITION AND FOCUS

ON PHYSICAL NATURE OF PAINT.

ANOTHER PAINTING WHICH WE HAVE,

WHICH PROBABLY IS THE MOST

FAMOUS PAINTING OF THAT PERIOD,

IT'S CALLED "LOST ANGEL."

IT WAS PAINTED IN 1912, TWO

YEARS BEFORE WORLD WAR I

STARTED.

AS CRITICS ALL AGREE, IT'S QUITE

PROPHETIC BECAUSE IT KIND OF

PREDICTS THAT TERRIBLE TRAGEDY

THAT CAME TO EUROPE.

THERE IS THIS HINT ABOUT

DESTRUCTION OF CITIES AND

TRAGEDY.

IT WAS HIS LIFELONG DREAM TO GO

TO INDIA.

AND AT LAST HE CAME TO INDIA IN

1924.

HE WENT TO THIS EXTRAORDINARY

EXTRADITION AT THAT TIME WITH

HIS WIFE HELENA AND HIS SON

GEORGE, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH

THE MOUNTAINS.

DURING THE FIRST EIGHT MONTHS OF

1924, HE STAYED IN THE FOOTHILLS

OF THE HIMALAYA.

HE PAINTED ABOUT 80 CANVASES,

CHANGED HIS STYLE COMPLETELY.

WE CAN ALMOST SAY THAT HE WAS

COMPLETELY REBORN AS AN ARTIST.

HE DEVELOPED A COMPLETELY

DIFFERENT PALETTE OF COLORS.

MY FAVORITE PAINTING OVER THESE

YEARS, IT'S ACTUALLY A SMALL

PIECE, 12 X 16 INCHES.

LIKE EVERYTHING ELSE IN NATURE,

MOUNTAINS CONTAINS THIS PRIMEAL

LIFE FORCE, DEEPER LAYERS OF

REALITY.

IF YOU GO TO HIMALAYA, STAND

BEFORE THEM, THE DOMINANT

FEELING IS JUST AN AWE.

YOU'RE COMPLETELY OVERTAKEN WITH

SOMETHING THAT IS AT THE SAME

TIME TERRIFIC AND UTTERLY

BEAUTIFUL, BUT THE POINT IS THAT

IT'S MUCH, MUCH BIGGER THAN YOU.

HE TRULY LOVED MOUNTAINS AND

CONTINUED TO PAINT THEM TILL THE

END OF HIS LIFE.

AND HE WAS EVEN CALLED MASTER OF

THE MOUNTAINS.

THERE IS A PART OF HIS LIFE IN

WHICH HE WAS A MYSTIC.

LOTS OF PAINTINGS ARE INFLUENCED

BY HIS PHILOSOPHY OR HIS

SPIRITUAL BELIEFS.

HE WAS VERY WELL VERSED IN THE

WORLD'S MYTHOLOGIES AND

RELIGIONS.

HE LOVED TO POINT OUT WHENEVER

HE COULD THAT HIS WORKS ACTUALLY

SHOULD HAVE TWO NAMES OR TWO

AUTHORS OR TWO PAINTERS.

HIM AND HIS WIFE.

BECAUSE HIS WIFE WAS MORE OFTEN

THAN NOT AN INSPIRATION BEHIND

THE PAINTING.

AND THERE ARE QUITE A NUMBER OF

PAINTINGS WHICH WERE PAINTED

ACCORDING TO HER VISIONS.

SO SHE JUST DESCRIBED TO HIM

WHAT TO PAINT, AND HE DID IT.

LIKE "THE MOTHER OF THE WORLD"

WHICH IS BY FAR THE MOST POPULAR

PAINTING AMONGST VISITORS.

AFTER THEY REACHED INDIA, HE

PRODUCED ONE OF HIS MAYBE MOST

FAMOUS PAINTINGS.

HE CALLED IT "KRISHNA."

WHEN YOU SEE THIS PAINTING, JUST

IMAGINE THAT HE'S SURVIVED THIS

INCREDIBLY HARD JOURNEY OF FIVE

YEARS LONG.

AND THERE WAS LOTS OF MISERY,

LOTS OF DEPRIVATION, LOTS OF

HARDSHIP, DEATH, AND TRAGEDY.

AND THERE IS NOTHING OF THAT IN

HIS PAINTING.

TO ME IT IS VERY EQUIVALENT TO

BEETHOVEN'S "ODE TO JOY."

THAT IS A REAL HYMN TO NATURE AT

THAT MOMENT IN THE SPRING WHEN

EVERYTHING AWAKENS AND EMERGES

FROM WINTER'S SLUMBER AND STARTS

TO LIVE AGAIN.

AND IN A SENSE, THAT MAY BE HIS

MAIN MESSAGE, THAT JUST TO LIVE

IS ENOUGH.

THAT IS ENOUGH FOR FEELING

JOYFUL AND HAPPY AND FOR BEING

HERE.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING TO ALL

OF THIS, AND YOU'RE WELCOME TO

COME TO US, AND WE'LL BE GLAD TO

ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS AND TELL

YOU MORE ABOUT NICHOLAS RORIC

AND HIS WORK.

>>> HELLO, I'M RAFAEL PI ROMAN.

WELCOME TO LINCOLN CENTER.

THROUGH FEBRUARY 12th, NEW YORK

CITY BALLET PRESENTS ITS TRIBUTE

TO GEORGE BALANCHINE'S LEGACY.

AMONG THE HIGHLIGHTS "VOICES," A

WORLD PREMIER BALLET BY ALEXI

ROMANSKY.

THE PROGRAM ALSO INCLUDES

CHRISTOPHER WHEELDEN, "BRIGHT"

BY JUSTIN PECK, AND OPUS 19 "THE

DREAMER" BY JEROME ROBINS.

VISIT NYCBALLET.COM/CALENDAR.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

LINCOLNCENTER.ORG.

>> THANKS SO MUCH FOR JOINING US

TONIGHT.

I'M PAULA ZAHN AT THE TISCH WNET

STUDIOS AT LINCOLN CENTER.

GOOD NIGHT.

>>> NEXT WEEK ON "NYC ARTS," A

BEHIND THE SCENES VISIT WITH THE

FAMED METROPOLITAN CHORUS.

>> WE TRY TO PRESENT OURSELVES

AS ANY ONE CHARACTER, BUT WE'RE

COMPOSED OF 80 INDIVIDUALS.

WE FIGURE OUT HOW TO CREATE A

CHARACTER AS A CHORUS BY OUR

MUSICAL EXPRESSION OF THE SCORE.

♪♪

>> AND A LOOK AT THE EXHIBITION

J.R. CHRONICLES AT THE BROOKLYN

MUSEUM.

>> J.R.'S WORK DOESN'T EASILY

FIT INTO A BOX.

IT'S AT THE INTERSECTION OF

PHOTOGRAPHY, SOCIAL PRACTICE,

PUBLIC ART.

WE WANTED IN THIS EXHIBITION TO

REALLY FOCUS ON J.R.'S

COLLABORATIONS WITH COMMUNITIES

AND REALLY THINKING ABOUT HOW HE

GIVES VOICE TO THOSE

COMMUNITIES.

VERY OFTEN REPRESENTING THE

UNDERREPRESENTED OR

MISREPRESENTED.

>>> FUNDING FOR "NYC ARTS" IS

MADE POSSIBLE BY --

ROSALIND P. WALTER.

THEA PETSCHEK IERVOLINO

FOUNDATION.

THE LEWIS "SONNY" TURNER FUND

FOR DANCE.

JODY AND JOHN ARNHOLD.

ELISE JAFFE AND JEFFREY BROWN.

CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER.

ELROY AND TERRY KRUMHOLZ

FOUNDATION.

JEAN DUBINSKY APPLETON ESTATE.

THE MILTON AND SALLY AVERY ARTS

FOUNDATION.

AND ELLEN AND JAMES S. MARCUS.

THIS PROGRAM IS SUPPORTED IN

PART BY PUBLIC FUNDS FROM THE

NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF

CULTURAL AFFAIRS IN PARTNERSHIP

WITH THE CITY COUNCIL.

ADDITIONAL FUNDING PROVIDED BY

MEMBERS OF THIRTEEN.

"NYC ARTS" IS MADE POSSIBLE IN

PART BY FIRST REPUBLIC BANK.

>> FIRST REPUBLIC BANK PRESENTS

"FIRST THINGS FIRST."

AT FIRST REPUBLIC BANK, FIRST

REFERS TO OUR FIRST PRIORITY.

THE CLIENTS WHO WALK THROUGH OUR

DOORS.

THE FIRST STEP?

RECOGNIZE THAT EVERY CLIENT IS

AN INDIVIDUAL WITH UNIQUE NEEDS.

FIRST DECREE.

BE A BANK WHOSE CURRENCY IS

SERVICE IN THE FORM OF PERSONAL

BANKING.

THIS WAS FIRST REPUBLIC'S

MISSION FROM OUR VERY FIRST DAY.

IT'S STILL THE FIRST THING ON

STREAM NYC-ARTS ON

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