NYC-ARTS

S2020 E474 | FULL EPISODE

NYC-ARTS Full Episode: January 2, 2020

A profile of violinist Angelo Xiang Yu, winner of a 2019 Avery Fisher Career Grant Award. Followed by a visit to the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling. And a conversation with artist Faith Ringgold.

AIRED: January 02, 2020 | 0:27:46
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TRANSCRIPT

♪♪

>> Coming up on "NYC-Arts,"

a profile of violinist

Angelo Xiang Yu,

winner of a 2019

Avery Fisher Career Grant award.

>> Receiving the prestigious

Avery Fisher Career Grant

really means the world to me,

because Andre Watts,

Joshua Bell, Gil Shaham --

those artists have won

this award many years ago.

And I actually grew up

listening to their CDs.

>> And a visit to the Sugar Hill

Children's Museum of Art &

Storytelling.

>> We know that children

are natural artists.

And they're

also natural storytellers.

And we wanted to create

an institution dedicated

to their creative potential.

>> Funding for "NYC-Arts"

is made possible by...

This program is supported

in part by public funds

from the New York City

Department of Cultural Affairs

in partnership

with the City Council.

Additional funding provided

by Members of Thirteen.

"NYC-Arts" is made possible

in part by First Republic Bank.

>> First Republic Bank presents

"First Things First."

At First Republic Bank,

first refers to our

first priority -- the clients

who walk through our doors.

The first step?

Recognize that every client is

an individual with unique needs.

First decree -- be a bank

whose currency is service

in the form of personal banking.

This was First Republic's

mission from our very first day.

It's still the first thing

on our minds.

♪♪

>> Good evening and welcome

to "NYC-Arts."

I'm Paula Zahn at the

Tisch WNET Studios at

Lincoln Center.

The ceremony for the 2019

Avery Fisher Career

Grant awards took place

last March at the

Jerome L. Greene Performance

Space at WQXR.

These individual grants

of $25,000

give professional assistance

and recognition

to talented instrumentalists

who have great potential

for solo careers.

There were four recipients --

piano duo Christina

and Michelle Naughton...

the JACK Quartet...

pianist Henry Kramer...

and violinist Angelo Xiang Yu.

Born in Inner Mongolia, China,

Angelo Xiang Yu moved

to Shanghai at the age of 11

to study violin

at the conservatory there.

Later, he moved to Boston,

where he received his

bachelor's, master's, and Artist

Diploma from the New England

Conservatory of Music.

Last February, he received

a prestigious Lincoln Center

Emerging Artist award.

He is currently a member

of the Chamber Music of Lincoln

Center's Bowers Program.

>> Receiving the prestigious

Avery Fisher Career

Grants really means

the world to me,

because when I was little,

I would skip my lunch

and eat a lot for dinner,

because I can save

the lunch money

and I could buy the CDs

using that money.

And when I was a little boy,

I'd just collect CDs,

and listening to it hours

and hours -- CDs by Andre Watts,

Joshua Bell, Gil Shaham.

Those artists have won

this award many years ago.

And I actually grew up

listening to their CDs,

but I would never,

never imagine myself

winning this award.

♪♪

My pianist --

her name is Feng Niu.

She's a wonderful pianist

and she's always willing to be

a great collaborator.

And when she has a melody,

she can really sing

out very beautifully,

but when I have the melody,

she is giving me

the stage to shine.

♪♪

So, this violin is made

by probably

the greatest violin-maker

of the violin-making history,

Antonio Stradivari.

And he made this violin

at the year of 1729,

so she's almost 300 years old.

I said "she" because I really

think she's a lady.

I think this is not

just a piece of wood.

It has lots of history,

and I can almost touch

the soul of the violin

whenever I played it.

♪♪

The piece I played last night

for the Avery Fisher Career

Grant Award is called "Chaconne"

by Italian composer

Tomaso Vitali.

And I love this piece

because it is essentially

a Baroque piece,

but it has so much emotion

and colors in this work.

Of course, it's been transposed

a couple times, and

so that it becomes, actually,

a virtuoso piece.

But I can really see

the simplicity of it

at the same time.

The melody is so beautiful

that, after the concert,

people would always remember

that for many, many days.

The form of the "Chaconne"

is kind of like a theme

and variation.

It has a simple theme,

but later on,

it got more complicated,

and you see

all these variations.

And he would use

these variations to explore

the possibilities on the violin

and all kinds of violin

technique you can find.

And there is, of course,

the grand finale,

where the theme repeats,

but in a higher-register

octave -- very,

very powerful and emotional.

And all of that actually

really shows the virtuoso

aspect of a performer

but, at the same time,

also give the emotion

to the work itself.

♪♪

♪♪

♪♪

♪♪

♪♪

[ Applause ]

♪♪

>> Coming up next, we'll take a

trip uptown to the Sugar Hill

Children's Museum of Art &

Storytelling in Harlem.

The building, which includes

124 units of affordable housing

and an early-education center,

was designed by acclaimed

architect David Adjaye.

He is perhaps best-known for his

work on the National Museum

of African American History

and Culture in Washington, D.C.

The Sugar Hill neighborhood

of the early 20th century

was home to such notable figures

as Duke Ellington,

Langston Hughes, Lena Horne,

and Thurgood Marshall.

Today, the Sugar Hill

Children's Museum

celebrates that cultural legacy

of the neighborhood

and gives children access

to the arts and working artists,

nurturing the next generation

of creative thinkers.

[ The Sugar Hill Gang's

"Rapper's Delight" plays ]

>> Broadway Housing Communities

is a nonprofit organization

in New York City,

and our focus is primarily

housing, art, and education.

>> We've been working in

the neighborhoods of West Harlem

and Washington Heights

since the early 1980s,

creating housing for people

on the lowest economic bands,

including formerly homeless

families and individuals,

and creating educational

opportunity and integrating

the housing and educational

programs with the cultural arts.

>> The Sugar Hill Project

is a place where all of

the things that Broadway Housing

has learned over 35 years

has come alive.

So, we now have affordable

housing, where it's

a very diverse population

that reside within the unit.

>> Welcome, my friends.

>> We have an early-childhood

center, which is one ofthe

first museum preschools

here in New York City.

And we also have a Children's

Museum of Art & Storytelling.

>> Moana and Maui

are learning how to read.

>> This neighborhood has a very

high proportion of children

that are born into poverty,

it's largely a new-immigrant

community,

and it's one of the highest

birthrates in Manhattan.

>> I've been living

in the neighborhood

for about 10 years now.

My work -- it's about responding

to the places that I live in

and the spaces that I walk

around, the people that I see.

I'm from the Dominican Republic.

When I first came here,

I did not speak English,

and so I felt right at home

having this

Spanish-speaking community,

people from Santo Domingo,

Puerto Rico, Colombia.

>> The name Sugar Hill

Children's Museum of Art &

Storytelling was conceived

because we know that children

are natural artists.

And they're

also natural storytellers.

And we wanted to create

an institution dedicated

to their creative potential.

>> The mission of the Sugar Hill

Children's Museum

is to nurture the creative

and cognitive genius of children

between the ages of 3 to 8.

We are here

as an intergenerational space

to place artists

and storytellers

and actors and writers

in dialogue with children

so that children are inspired

to create their own art

and stories.

>> Unlike most children's

museums

that are indoor play spaces,

this is a contemporary

art museum for children.

The focus on the arts

and the seriousness

with which we take the arts

and the capacity of children

to understand

and think about the dimensions

of a creative experience in art

is quite expansive.

>> Storytelling

and art experiences,

not just viewing encounters,

happen in lots of

different ways.

We have our story hour,

and then there is story time,

which is a more musical-

or dance-oriented production

with art-making afterwards.

There's our Studio Lab,

which is a space for independent

tactile exploration

and thinking about the materials

or the colors

or the concepts that are on view

in some of the exhibitions.

Children have the opportunity

to just engage with that.

And then, you know,

we have these reading nooks,

where we have a selection

of books that are curated,

sometimes inspired by the themes

in the exhibition,

sometimes inspired

by the themes of the month,

but parents have the opportunity

to intimately

share a story with their child,

or children have the opportunity

to figure it out themselves.

>> Museums should have moments

and spaces where children

do not only engage by looking,

but, also, they are active.

They have, already, a lot

of stimulation catered to them

through media, through,

you know, the clothes industry,

the toy industry,

so a museum's role is to provide

those other elements

that they're not getting

and have this environment

as part of something

that they belong to and that

they deserve to have access to.

>> The artist-in-residence

has about 450 square feet

of private space for 11 months,

and they receive a stipend.

We ask that the artist

is engaged

with creating a new body of work

so that visitors

can encounter the freshness

of what it means to have ideas

and what it means to be

committed to your practice.

Once a month, we ask that they

open up their doors,

office hours, for parents

and children to just observe.

We do not look specifically for

artists who work with children.

If that were the case,

we'd be only looking

for teaching artists.

We are looking for artists

who are very committed

to their practice

and also have a sense of comfort

in sharing their practice

with children.

>> The kinds of materials

that I use most of the time have

this quality of translucency.

I use polyester thread

to create lines.

I also use very transparent,

kind of vellum or Mylar

to create works where the lines

are, like, the main element.

And I also like to combine

glass, thread, and cotton

and canvas and linen.

This is what I've been

bringing to the children

or sharing with the children.

One of the projects

that we've been working on

is creating images that have

to do with architecture...

>> This building.

>> People in the triangle and

two windows.

>> Two windows.

...but also thinking about

how the places that we are,

how they also shape the way we

behave and the way that we feel.

Oh, I like that, Laurie.

They have so much to offer

and so much to bring,

especially with how pure

they are and how honest

and open they are

and flexible to learning.

Thank you.

They're not fixated

in one outcome.

They're not obsessing over

the result of that thing

that they're making.

And they're pretty much learning

as they make.

They have this sense of

curiosity and this excitement.

Yeah, let's unveil this

masterpiece.

>> One of the ideas

that we're always thinking about

is this intergenerational idea,

where you have young children

working alongside adults,

whether it's their parents

or a grandparent

or someone else who is,

like, really close to them,

and what's the exchange

that can happen there?

>> Look at that.

That's interesting.

>> All the people represented

in my work,

they are all local people.

They are all people who work

in the neighborhood

or walk around the neighborhood

or live in the neighborhood.

I'm also very interested

in creating an imagery

that reflects those children

and sort of to change,

a little bit,

what my daughter sees in books,

and I want her to be able

to see herself in books,

children that look like her.

And this is a really

exciting part, where all of

these children start coming here

and they recognize

themself in the drawings.

And it's magical to see that.

To make art where the people

see themselves represented,

I think it has a strong impact,

and it brings this sense

of ownership of the creative

practice of a local artist.

All of this work has to do

with representation

and drawing people and children

sort of to create this

visual archive

that will allow for people

to see themself in the work

that I am producing.

I feel pretty strongly

about that.

>> Many times,

I think children's museums

underestimate the types

of questions that children

are capable of asking

or underestimate the types

of questions that children

are actually being posed,

so we're looking

to contemporary artists

and seeing if they can help us

do that in very thoughtful ways,

pose questions,

give them opportunities

to think.

>> We tried to conceive

of what would be the most

long-standing contribution

that we could make

to this neighborhood,

and that was the museum,

because a museum is a symbol

of a community

that's prosperous,

that's healthy, that cherishes

its history and all its people.

A museum is a commitment

to the future

and to the future of the

children of this neighborhood.

♪♪

>> Hello. I'm Rafael Pi Roman.

Welcome to Lincoln Center.

From January 3rd through

January 7th,

the New York Philharmonic

will present a program

that includes Respighi's

"Trittico Botticelliano"

and Haydn's "Symphony No. 96."

Jeffrey Kahane will conduct

the orchestra and will also lead

Mozart's "Piano Concerto No. 22"

from the piano.

The matinee concert on Saturday,

January 4th, will open

with Brahms' "Piano Quintet,"

performed by the New York

Philharmonic String Quartet

and Jeffrey Kahane on piano.

The program will be followed

by a Q&A

with Philharmonic musicians.

For complete details,

please visit nyphil.org.

And for even more information

about events at Lincoln Center,

you can visit their website

at lincolncenter.org.

♪♪

♪♪

>> So I said, "Oh, boy.

I want to do 125th Street.

Yeah, I'm going to do it because

125th Street is where all,

you know, the people are."

That's the center.

And I went in there and got it.

[ Laughs ]

That worked for me.

♪♪

These are people who I associate

with my life

growing up in Harlem --

the musicians,

the artists, the politicians,

all of these truly great people

who influenced my life

and made me know that

I could do anything I wanted

because they're doing it.

♪♪

125th Street was just the center

of culture in those days.

And I saw them all,

and we all lived together.

You know,

like, W.E.B. Du Bois lived

right up the street from me

and Thurgood Marshall.

Oh, my goodness.

We'd see those people

all the time.

I mean, those people were --

You know, they just

were neighborhood people.

We used to wait until 3:00

in the morning, and then

we would go up to 155th street

and catch Duke Ellington coming

out of the 155th Street subway.

And he would stop into a little

diner right there on the corner.

And we'd be in there waiting

for him, and he would come in

and he would order a pint

of ice cream to go.

And we would just sit there

and just drool over him.

But you couldn't run up to these

people and start yelling about,

you know,

"We need an autograph."

No. They don't do that.

Just, you know,

be cool, and we did,

but we also got to see him.

[ Laughs ]

He was so wonderful.

There's no law saying you can't

get rid of perspective.

There's no law saying you can't

get rid of chiaroscuro.

If you want things to be flat --

And I do.

I want to use the colors

and I want them seen.

I don't want the light

in the shade.

I levitate all of them.

Well, it's a certain kind

of freedom,

which I think is just the most

important thing in the world.

It's also an interesting way

to use the space.

You know, inject the people

in the space,

have them moving through it.

I had myself flying sometimes

somewhere, you know?

Please, I don't leave myself

out of anything.

[ Laughs ]

That's an idea.

I should have done that.

I should have put myself

over there with the artists.

Didn't give it a thought.

>> Next week on "NYC-Arts,"

a conversation with

Jonathan Stafford and

Wendy Whelan,

the new artistic leadership

of the New York City Ballet.

>> Since Wendy and I both danced

that role quite a bit,

we feel like we can step

in there and give, you know,

just those little

fine-tuning details

to just elevate the performance

that little bit.

>> I wanted to help them build

a landscape in their mind

of where to push farther,

where to soften up,

where to think

differently throughout,

the way the music

also has a landscape.

>> And a visit to

the Metropolitan Museum of Art

for a look at the museum's

collection of postwar

and contemporary art.

>> The painting serves

as a kind of inventory

or catalog of painter strokes --

some thick, some thin,

some stable, some strong,

others fluid, others weak.

>> Thanks for joining us

this evening.

I'm Paula Zahn at the Tisch WNET

Studios at Lincoln Center.

Good night.

♪♪

>> Funding for "NYC-Arts"

is made possible by...

This program is supported

in part by public funds

from the New York City

Department of Cultural Affairs

in partnership

with the City Council.

Additional funding provided

by Members of Thirteen.

"NYC-Arts" is made possible

in part by First Republic Bank.

>> First Republic Bank presents

"First Things First."

At First Republic Bank,

"first" refers to our

first priority -- the clients

who walk through our doors.

The first step?

Recognize that every client is

an individual with unique needs.

First decree -- be a bank

whose currency is service

in the form of personal banking.

This was First Republic's

mission from our very first day.

It's still the first thing

on our minds.

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