Journey Indiana

S1 E11 | FULL EPISODE

Episode 111

Coming to you from the Wabash and Erie Canal Park in Delphi...travel with us to the Howard Steamboat Museum in Jeffersonville, Indiana; enjoy a front row seat at this year's Indiana Limestone Symposium in Monroe County; and get on the water in a canoe restored by Hoosier Woodworks.

AIRED: June 11, 2019 | 0:26:46
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

>> PRODUCTION SUPPORT FOR

"JOURNEY INDIANA" IS PROVIDED

BY:

>> COMING UP, TRAVEL WITH US TO

THE HOWARD STEAMBOAT MUSEUM IN

JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA.

ENJOY A FRONT ROW SEAT AT THIS

YEAR'S LIMESTONE SYMPOSIUM IN

MONROE COUNTY AND GET ON THE

WATER IN A CANOE RESTORED BY

HOOSIER WOOD WORKS.

THAT'S ALL ON THIS EPISODE OF

"JOURNEY INDIANA."

>>> WELCOME TO "JOURNEY

INDIANA."

I'M BRANDON WENTZ AND TODAY WE

ARE COMING TO YOU FROM TO THE

WABASH PARK.

IT'S HOME TO AN INTERPRETIVE

MUSEUM, THE HISTORIC REED CASE

HOME AND THE REPLICA CANAL BOAT

CALLED APPROPRIATELY ENOUGH, THE

DELPHI.

AND WE'LL LEARN ALL ABOUT THAT

AND MORE IN JUST A LITTLE BIT,

BUT FIRST, WE'RE HEADED TO

ANOTHER MUSEUM JUST STEPS AWAY

FROM ANOTHER BODY OF WATER.

PRODUCER ADAM CARROLL HAS THE

STORY OF THE HOWARD STEAMBOAT

MUSEUM IN JEFFERSONVILLE.

>> THROUGHOUT THE MID- TO

LATE-1800s STEAMBOATS

CONNECTED PITTSBURGH TO THE WEST

COAST USING THE OHIO RIVER AND

THE MISSOURI TRIBUTARIES.

EVEN IN TIMES OF WAR, THE

STEAMBOAT WAS AN IDEAL WAY TO

TRAVEL AROUND COUNTRY.

>> WHEN THE FIRST SETTLERS CAME

TO AMERICA, THEY WERE LOOKING TO

EXPAND IN THE COMMUNITIES AND

ONE OF THE THINGS THEY FOUND WAS

THE EASIEST WAY TO TRAVEL TO GET

AROUND WERE THE RIVERS.

THE RIVERS WERE ALREADY NEAR,

THEY WERE ESTABLISHED.

SO SOME OF THE EARLIEST

SETTLEMENTS EAST OF THE

APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS WERE THE

RIVERS.

YOU COULD BUILD A RUDIMENTARY

CRAFT AND SAIL THESE RIVERS

EASILY.

WE WERE IN JUST A FEW YEARS OF

LEWIS AND CLARK RETURNING IN

1805 FROM THEIR EXPEDITION OUT

WEST.

THEY HAD GONE UP THE MISSOURI

RIVER OVER THE BITTERROOT

MOUNTAINS AND THE COLUMBIA RIVER

AND FOUND A PATHWAY TO THE WEST.

WELL ARE FOR THIS REASON, NOW

PEOPLE WEREN'T JUST ON THE OHIO

RIVER.

NOW PEOPLE HAVE ALL OF THIS NEW

LAND TO EXPAND INTO.

AND THEY WANTED TO AND THE

STEAMBOAT WAS THE WAY THERE.

COULD YOU LOAD UP EVERYTHING YOU

NEEDED.

YOU COULD LOAD YOUR FARM, ALL

THE EQUIPMENT YOU NEEDED TO

BUILD A HOMESTEAD.

EVERYTHING ON THE STEAMBOAT AND

GO AS FAR AS THE BOAT COULD GO.

YOU COULD DO THIS NOW.

FOR THAT VERY REASON, ALL OF

THESE COMMUNITIES SPRUNG UP VERY

QUICKLY.

YOU LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF

AMERICA AND BETWEEN 1811 AND

1850, ALMOST EVERY MAJOR STATE

CAME INTO BEING EAST OF THE

APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS IN THAT

ERA BAZ YOU BECAUSE YOU COULD GET THERE

BY THE NEW RIVER STEAMBOAT.

>> THE STEAMBOAT WAS BEHIND THE

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THE 19th

19th CENTURY.

IT PLAYED A HUGE ROLE IN OUR

EVERYDAY LIFE OF OUR COUNTRY,

BUT IT ALSO BROUGHT IMMIGRANTS

TO EVERY PORT ON THE INLAND

WATERWAYS.

IT BROUGHT A CHANGE OF DIRECTION

FOR TOWNS AND CITIES.

EVERYTHING.

EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED TO THE

RIVER AND EVERYTHING ON THE

RIVER WAS CONNECTED TO

ECONOMICS.

>> AS SETTLEMENTS CROPPED UP AND

WORK BOOMED ALONG THE RIVER,

ENTERTAINMENT WAS PURSUED BY

BUSINESSMEN.

JOE STREKSUS GAPPED TALENTS GATHERED

ENTERTAINMENT.

>> SO HE CAME UP WITH THE IDEA

OF HE NEEDED TO HAVE A DANCE

BAND THAT WAS VERSATILE.

HE GOES THROUGH AND HEARS THIS

NEW STYLE OF MUSIC, AND WHAT IT

WAS, IT WAS AN INFUSION OF THE

CARIBBEAN SOUND INTO RAGTIME

WITH A BIT OF A TEMPO OF A WALTZ

IN IT, BUT IT WAS VERY VERSATILE

IN THE SPEED AND THE TEMPOS THAT

COULD BE PLAYED.

SO HE HIRED THIS BAND AND TAKES

THEM UP AND DOWN THE

MISSISSIPPI.

NOW, WHEN THIS MUSIC CAME OUT OF

THE NEW ORLEANS AREA, IT CREATES

A SENSATION ON THE RIVERS.

>> ENTERTAINMENT AND

HOMESTEADING BROUGHT BOATS TO

JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA, AND TO

THE HOWARD FAMILY.

BASED OUT OF ONE OF THE BIGGEST

SETTLEMENTS ON THE OHIO RIVER,

THE FAMILY BECAME THE LARGEST

BUILDER OF STEAMBOATS.

THE THREE GENERATIONS RAN THE

INDUSTRY, BUILDING FLAT BOTTOMS

TO TOW BOATS, FOR YEARS THEY

THRIVED.

BY THE TIME EDMOND HOWARD TOOK

OVER, HE SAW THE EXPANSION OF

THE RAILROADS AND THE

STEAMBOATS.

HE AND HIS WIFE OVERSAW THE

CONSTRUCTION OF THE HOUSE THAT

WOULD LATER BECOME KNOWN AS THE

HOWARD STEAMBOAT MUSEUM, KEEPING

THE HISTORY OF THE INDUSTRY

ALIVE.

>> HE WANTED A LEGACY TO HIS

FAMILY'S STEAMBOAT BUILDING AND

WHAT THEY HAD DONE FOR THE

RIVER.

HE OPENED THE MUSEUM IN 1958.

AND STILL, IT WAS HARD TO KEEP

THE MUSEUM GOING.

YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT KEEPING A

22-ROOM, 15,000 SQUARE FOOT

VICTORIAN MANSION GOING, YOU

KNOW, FOR PEOPLE TO COME TOUR

WHEN THEY WOULD, BUT IT TOOK OFF

LIKE WILDFIRE.

THE SCHOOLS STARTED COMING.

BY THE MIDDLE 19 1960s, LORETTA

COULDN'T DO IT ALL HERSELF.

SHE WAS TOO BUSY.

>> IN 1956, HIS RELATIVE JAMES

HOWARD WOULD ON HIS DEATH BED

ASK HIS WIDOW TO TELL THEIR

STORY AND IT STAYED BUSY.

HOW HAS SURVIVED FIRES AND

FLOODS, BOTH CAUSING ONLY

MINIMAL DAMAGE.

THE MUSEUM IS, LIKE ITS

SUBJECTS, STRONG, LASTING AND

IMPORTANT TO THE SURROUNDING

COMMUNITY.

>> THE HOWARD STEAMBOAT MUSEUM

IS A UNIQUE MUSEUM.

IT'S NOT LIKE ANY OTHER MUSEUM

IN THE UNITED STATES.

IT'S THE ONLY STEAMBOAT MUSEUM.

WE HAVE MUSEUMS ALL OVER THIS

COUNTRY DEDICATED TO INDIVIDUAL

RIVERS TO INDIVIDUAL STEAMBOATS

BUT WE HAVE ONE MUSEUM IN THE

NATION THAT'S DEDICATED TO THE

STEAMBOAT, AND THAT'S THE HOWARD

MUSEUM.

AND WHAT MAKES IT EVEN MORE

SPECIAL, IT'S IN THE HOME OF THE

PREMIER BUILDER OF THE

STEAMBOATS ON THE RIVERS.

SO IT MAKES IT A REALLY SPECIAL

PLACE.

WE GET PEOPLE WOULD COME HERE

FROM THE STEAMBOAT HISTORY, FOR

THE HOUSE HISTORY, AND FOR THE

FAMILY HISTORY AND WE GET PEOPLE

FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD THAT

COME HERE BECAUSE THEY STUDIED

THE HISTORY OF STEAMBOATS AND

REALIZED WHAT AN IMPORTANT PART

OF THE HOWARDS PLAYED, BUT I'M

SEEING MORE AND MORE INTEREST IN

THAT AS OF LATE AND THE HISTORY

PART.

AND IT'S BY YOUNGER FOLKS THAN

I'M USED TO SEEING.

THE LAST FEW YEARS HERE AT THE

MUSEUM, IT'S THE INTEREST OF

YOUNGER PEOPLE IN THEIR HISTORY,

IN THEIR COMMUNITY, AND WE ARE A

UNIQUE PIECE BECAUSE NOT ONLY

ARE WE A COMMUNITY PIECE, BUT

THIS IS PART OF THE FABRIC OF

THE UNITED STATES, THE

STEAMBOAT.

>> I THINK WE HAVE TO BEGIN TO

IMPRESS UPON OUR STUDENTS, HOW

IMPORTANT IT IS THAT WE PRESERVE

WHAT WE HAVE, AND TEACH OTHERS

ABOUT WHAT WE HAVE.

I WANT TO REACH THE STUDENTS AS

OUR FUTURE PRESERVATIONISTS.

I WANT THEM TO CARE ABOUT WHAT

HAPPENS TO THEIR HISTORY.

TO DO THAT, YOU HAVE TO MAKE IT

LIVE AND RELEVANT AND IT HAS TO

BE FUN.

I THINK THAT'S ONE OF THE BEST

THINGS WE CAN DO HERE.

THE 19th CENTURY RESIDENTS

WERE GREAT COLLECTORS.

AND SCRAPBOOKERS AND SAVERS, AND

WE'RE GOING TO MISS THAT IN

ANOTHER 100 YEARS.

SO I WOULD LIKE TO SEE

EVERYTHING CONTINUE ON, AS A WAY

FOR US TO SEE A DIFFERENT ERA OF

TIME.

>> PEOPLE ARE LOOKING TO

IDENTIFY WITH THEIR HISTORY MORE

AND SO I THINK SEE THAT AS A

VERY STRONG MOVE FOR OUR FUTURE.

IT OPENS THEIR MIND TO NEW

IDEAS.

>> AND YOU CAN GET MORE

INFORMATION AT

HOWARDSTEAMBOATMUSEUM.ORG.

>>> NOW WE ARE JOINED BY DAN

McCAIN, PRESIDENT OF THE

WABASH AND ERIE CANAL PART.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR HAVING US.

>> I'M GLAD YOU ARE HERE.

>> COULD YOU TELL US ABOUT THE

CANAL AND THE IMPORTANCE TO

DELPHI?

>> WELL, IT WAS A VERY IMPORTANT

TO DELPHI.

IT OPENED IN 1840.

THAT WAS A BIG TIME FOR DELPHI.

THERE WERE NO OTHER ROADS OR

RAILROADS OR MAJOR WAYS TO BRING

THINGS TO THIS PART.

THOSE ARRIVING FROM THE EAST

THAT WERE GOING TO BE RESIDENTS

HERE NEEDED SOMETHING TO SHIP

THEIR PRODUCTS BACK TO THE EAST,

JENNERGENERALLY OR BE ABLE TO BRING

MORE PRODUCTS IN FROM THE EAST.

SO BY 1840, YOU COULD NOT STILL

YET REACH LAKE ERIE.

BUT BY 1843, YOU COULD.

SO WHEN YOU GOT TO TOLEDO, ON

THE WABASH ERIE CANAL, THEN YOU

COULD GO ALL THE WAY ACROSS LAKE

ERIE, FIND YOUR WAY ACROSS NEW

YORK STATE ON THE ERIE CANAL, WE

GET CALLED THE ERIE CANAL, LOTS

OF TIMES BUT WE ARE NOT.

WE ARE OVER 100 MILES LONGER

THAN THE ERIE CANAL.

IT'S AN IMPORTANT THING TO

DELPHI.

>> THE PARK FOCUSES ON THE

IMPORTANCE.

HOW DID THE PARK COME TO BE?

>> WELL, THAT'S KIND OF

INTERESTING.

IN DELPHI, WE WERE STUCK WITH A

WATERED SECTION THAT WAS REALLY

THE DEPLORABLE SITUATION.

IT HAD STAGNANT WATER AND GREEN

ALGAE, DUCKWEED ACROSS THE

SURFACE OF IT AND LOTS OF DOWNED

TREES AND WEEDS AND MILLIONS OF

MOSQUITOES, AND WE WERE STUCK

WITH IT.

AND SO CONSEQUENTIALLY, MOST OF

THE RESIDENTS OF DELPHI WERE

QUITE NEGATIVE ABOUT THE CANAL.

MY MOTHER AND ABOUT A DOZEN

PEOPLE, THE FIRST DIRECTORS OF

THE CANAL ASSOCIATION BACK IN

1971 FORMED THE ORGANIZATION

WITH A DREAM, AND THEIR DREAM

WAS TO HAVE THIS PARK, AND THEY

COULD ARTICULATE THINGS THEY

THOUGHT WERE VERY IMPORTANT

ABOUT IT, INCLUDING THE HISTORY

OF THE CANAL ITSELF, AND MOST OF

THE PEOPLE IN THE COMMUNITY

WOULD SAY, YOU ARE WASTING YOUR

TIME.

YOU ARE NEVER GOING TO MAKE

ANYTHING OUT OF IT.

ASIT'S TOO BIG A PROJECT, JUST

FORGET IT.

AND THEY WOULDN'T.

THEY WOULDN'T LEAVE IT.

WE GOT THIS BECAUSE OF THE DREAM

OF THE EARLY GENERATION AHEAD OF

ME.

>> SO NOW WHEN PEOPLE COME HERE,

CAN YOU GIVE US KIND OF A TOUR,

WHAT CAN PEOPLE EXPECT TO.

>> HE.

>> WELL, WE HAVE A MILE

REWATERRED, REDREDGED AND AN

OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU TO TRAVEL ON

THE CANAL BOAT WE HAVE.

AND WE HAVE A TRAIL SYSTEM

THAT'S TEN MILES LONG.

SO YOU CAN EXPLORE EVEN

ADDITIONAL SECTIONS OF THE CANAL

AND SOME OTHER THINGS ABOUT

DOWNTOWN DELPHI AND CONNECT WITH

WATERWAYS.

SO IT'S SOMETHING FOR PEOPLE TO

COME TO AND SEE.

AND WE, OF COURSE, HAVE A BIG

MUSEUM THAT'S QUITE IMPORTANT

TOO.

>> NOW, OUT OF EVERYTHING THAT

YOU SEE HERE EVERYDAY, WHAT'S

YOUR FAVORITE THING?

>> WELL I PARTICULARLY ENJOY

HAVING YOUNG PEOPLE COME HERE.

FOR ONE THING, THIS IS QUITE OUT

OF THE ORDINARY FOR THEM, AND IF

YOU WERE A YOUNGSTER AND GROWING

UP AROUND HERE AS I DID, I DID

BECOME FAMILIARIZED WITH THE

CANAL, AND SO WHEN FOURTH

GRADERS, PARTICULARLY THAT PARTICULARLY, STUDYING

INDIANA HISTORY, IT'S FUN FOR ME

TO TAKE THEM ON A TRIP AND WE

TALK ABOUT THINGS, AND I CALL IT

MY PLAYGROUND, WHEN I GREW UP.

SOMETIMES THE KIDS WILL SAY,

WHERE ARE THE SWINGS AND THE

SLIDES.

I SAID, NO, NO, WE DIDN'T HAVE

THAT.

THIS WAS A PRETTY RAW AREA IN

THE SENSE OF NOT VERY FINISHED.

NOW TODAY, WE CAN SHOW QUITE A

FINISHED PRODUCT, AND SOMETHING

THAT YOU MIGHT HAVE EXPECTED TO

SEE IN 1850.

>> THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR HAVING

US HERE TODAY, DAN.

>> I'M GLAD YOU CAME TODAY.

>> UP NEXT, WE ARE HEADED SOUTH

TO ELLETTSVILLE.

TO MEET THE ARTISTS AT THIS

YEAR'S LIMESTONE SYMPOSIUM.

>> I HAD SEEN SYMPOSIUMS IN

EUROPE, WHICH ARE A LITTLE BIT

OF A DIFFERENT DEAL.

I WILL THOUGHT WELL, HERE IS THE

PERFECT PLACE TO GATHER CARVERS

AND HAVE EVENTS.

>> HERE IS JUST OUTSIDE THE

GATES OF THE BIBY STONE COMPANY.

>> THIS IS WHERE THE STONE IS

QUARRIED, AND THIS IS WHERE ALL

THAT WONDERFUL ARCHITECTURAL

STONE WORK IN NEW YORK AND

CHICAGO AND PROBABLY EVERY STATE

IN THE UNION COMES OUT OF THIS

PART OF INDIANA.

>> IT'S A BIG THING, ACTUALLY.

FOR MOST PEOPLE, YOU KNOW, ONCE

YOU HAVE SEEN ONE ROCK, YOU HAVE

SEEN THEM ALL, YOU KNOW?

>> IN 1996, AMY, ALONG WITH

FELLOW CARVER FRANK YOUNG,

DEVELOPED THE INDIANA LIMESTONE

SYMPOSIUM.

>> SO WE STARTED WITH FIVE OF US

IN A MUDDY, MUDDY FIELD, AND

IT'S DEVELOPED FROM THERE.

>> TODAY THE THREE-WEEK

SYMPOSIUM ATTRACTS FOLKS FROM

ALL OVER THE COUNTRY.

SOME EXPERIENCED, SOME NOT SO

MUCH.

>> AND I WILL HELP GUIDE YOUR

HAND.

THERE YOU GO.

THERE YOU GO!

YEAH, YEAH, YEAH!

>> AND A LOT OF THEM ARE REPEAT

CUSTOMERS.

>> WE HAVE GOT PEOPLE WHO COME

BACK YEAR AFTER YEAR.

SOMETIMES I CALL IT A FAMILY

REUNION WHERE EVERYONE IS ON

THEIR BEST BEHAVIOR.

>> ONE OF THE ORIGINAL RECENT

CUSTOMERS WAS SHARON.

>> I WANTED TO CARVE LIMESTONE

AND SO I FIGURED IF I WILL LEARN

HOW TO CARVE LIMESTONE, I NEED

TO GO TO THE SOURCE.

THIS IS THE SOURCE.

BACK IN 2000, I WAS ABLE TO COME

OUT, SIGN UP FOR MY FIRST

SYMPOSIUM, AND GET MY FIRST BIG

PIECE OF STONE AND LEARN ABOUT

THE TOOLS.

I FELL HEAD OVER HEELS IN LOVE

WITH, IT MORE SO THAN I EVER

EXPECTED.

AND I'M LIKE THE OLD PENNY THAT

NEVER GOES AWAY.

I JUST KEEP COMING BACK.

>> FOR A BEGINNER, LIKE SHARON

WAS IN 2000, LIMESTONE CAN BE AN

EASY STONE TO FALL IN LOVE WITH.

>> LIMESTONE IN INDIANA IS

PRETTY SOFT.

IT'S PROBABLY ONE OF THE BETTER

THINGS TO BEGIN TEACHING, WITH

BECAUSE, YOU KNOW, IF YOU START

TEACHING WITH MARBLE, THEN THEY

DON'T REALLY GET ANYTHING DONE

IN A WEEK, WHEREAS WITH A SOFTER

MATERIAL, YOU CAN MOVE QUICKER.

YOU CAN TEACH MORE.

AND THEY CAN GET MORE DONE AND

STUDENTS GET MORE EXCITED WHEN

THEY SEE WHAT'S BEING DONE.

>> IT HAS A GRAIN, BUT THE GRAIN

DOESN'T AFFECT THE CUTTING OF

IT.

SO YOU CAN GO INTO IT IN ANY

ANGLE.

YOU DON'T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT

SOMETHING BREAKING OFF.

THERE'S NO FLAWS IN IT.

IT'S JUST -- IT'S JUST -- I LOVE

IT.

>> THE MOST WONDERFUL THING FOR

ME IS TO COME AND TO SEE THE

STONE, OR ALONGSIDE THE ROAD OR

IN THE QUARRIES OR THAT KIND OF

THING.

WHEREVER YOU LOOK, EVEN IN THE

TOWNS, YOU KNOW, AS YOU COME

FURTHER EAST, YOU SEE FACADES

AND THE BUILDING MATERIALS AND

TO ACTUALLY SEE IT IS SO

EXCITING.

>> NO LONGER A BEGINNER, SHARON

SERVES AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE

SYMPOSIUM SINCE 2012.

>> COMING OUT HERE IS BASICALLY

THE CHARGING OF MY CREATIVE

BATTERIES.

I'M A SOLITARY SCULPTOR.

I LIVE IN A REMOTE AREA IN NEW

MEXICO.

I DON'T HAVE THAT MUCH FEEDBACK

FROM SCULPTORS AS SUCH.

I HAVE A LOT OF PEER FRIENDS,

BUT WHEN I COME HERE, I HAVE ALL

OF MY OLD FRIENDS AND I MAKE ALL

OF THESE NEW FRIENDS AND WE --

YOU KNOW, THE SHARING OF IDEAS.

I THINK THAT'S WHAT HAPPENS WITH

EVERYBODY WHO RETURNS AND THE

NEW PEOPLE WOULD COME, THEY ARE

REVITALIZED OR INSPIRED TO GO

BACK TO THEIR STUDIOS WITH THOSE

FRESH EYES.

>> I HAVE BEEN CARVING FOR 46

YEARS, BUT YOU CAN ALWAYS LEARN

SOMETHING NEW.

YOU KNOW, BEING ALWAYS FIND A

NEW TOOL OR A NEW LITTLE IDEA

THAT YOU DIDN'T THINK ABOUT,

LIKE TECHNIQUE OR SOMETHING LIKE

THAT.

THERE'S ALWAYS SOMETHING.

>> AND IN THE CASE OF THE

INDIANA LIMESTONE SYMPOSIUM,

PERHAPS THAT SOMETHING ISN'T

JUST THE ROCKS OR THE TOOL, BUT

THE PERSON WORKING BESIDE YOU.

>> I REALIZED REALIZED AT THIS POINT IN

MY CAREER, IT'S LIKE THE STONE

IS JUST THE VEHICLE TO HAVE THIS

GROUP OF PEOPLE COME TOGETHER

AND I HAVE MET JUST WONDERFUL,

AMAZING PEOPLE.

I THINK THIS IS A TENDER, SOFT

STONE AND IT IS TRACKED AND

CULTIVATES TENDER AND SOFT

PEOPLE.

>> THE LIMESTONE SYMPOSIUM RUNS

UNTIL JUNE 22nd AND THEY HAVE

A NUMBER OF DAYS THAT ARE OPEN

TO THE PUBLIC IF YOU WOULD LIKE

TO CHECK IT OUT FOR YOURSELF.

YOU CAN GET DIRECTIONS AND OTHER

INFORMATION AT AT

LIMESTONESYMPOSIUM.ORG.

>> WE SHOW WHAT YOU IT TAKES TO

PRESERVE A VINTAGE CANOE AND GET

IT BACK ON THE WATER.

>> ROGER KUGLER WAS RAISED ON A

FARM SURROUNDED BY WOOD.

HE HAD A BROTHER WHO WORKS

CONSTRUCTION AND ROGER LEARNED

TO WORK BY HIS GRANDFATHER'S

SIDE, DEVELOPING CHILDHOOD

MEMORIES SHAPED HIS PASSION.

>> I WAS PROBABLY 5 YEARS OLD

AND WE WENT TO VISIT SOME FAMILY

FRIENDS.

AND THEY HAD A BIG HOUSE, KIND

OF A BIG FARM AND THEY HAD A

LAKE AND I WAS WITH THE ADULTS.

YOU KNOW, THERE'S OTHER KIDS

AROUND.

WHY DON'T YOU GO OUTSEED AND OUTSIDE AND

PLAY, AND I WAS AT THE LACK.

THERE WAS A WOOD CANVAS CANOE

TIED AT THE DOCK.

I WAS LIKE, AM I ALLOWED TO DO

THIS?

SHOULD I DO THIS?

THERE'S NO ADULTS AROUND.

BOOM, I WAS IN THE CANOE.

IT WAS SUCH A MARVELOUS FEELING.

HERE I WAS SITTING ON WATER, AND

THE CANOE WAS MOVING.

AND I WAS MOVING WITH THE CANOE

AND THE REST OF THE WORLD WAS

STATIONARY.

>> HIS LOVE OF BOATS BEGAN EARLY

LONGSIDE HIS PASSION FOR WOOD.

ONE OF HIS FIRST PROJECTS AS A

KID WAS AN ENTIRE BATTLESHIP

SQUADRON.

AS HE GREW UP, HE CONTINUED TO

WORK WITH WOOD.

ONLY LEAVING IT WHEN HE LEFT FOR

THE NAVY.

AT THAT POINT, HE WENT FROM

BUILDING BOATS TO WORKING ON

BOATS.

>> YOU KNOW, AFTER THE NAVY, I

GOT INTO OUTDOOR RETAIL,

INDUSTRY, AND RESTORED CANOES

AND KAYAKS AND BACKBACKING AND

CLIMBING GEAR AND FLY FISHING

AND SO ON AND SO FORTH.

SO I ABSOLUTELY LOVED THAT AND I

LOVED TEACHING PEOPLE CANOEING

AND KAYAKING.

A GUY CAME IN AND SAID, MY DAD

HAS AN OLD WOOD CANVAS CANOE

THAT HE NEEDS TO RESTORE.

YOU GUYS DON'T DO THAT, DO YOU?

WELL, WE AS THE COMPANY DOESN'T,

BUT I WOULD BE WILLING TO TAKE A

CRACK AT IT.

I STARTED ON THE BOAT AND GOT IT

SKINNED, GOT THE RAILS OFF, AND

LOOKED AT THE STEMS AND THEY

WERE PARTIALLY GONE, ROTTED

AWAY.

AND I STOOD THERE AND LOOKED AT

THAT THING FOR LIKE THREE WEEKS,

TERRIFIED TO DO ANYTHING, BUT I

DIDN'T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT TO DO.

AND TO -- FINALLY, IT'S LIKE

THIS HAS GOT TO GET DONE SOME

DAY AND I FINALLY JUST PICKED UP

A SAW AND I MADE THE CUT.

IT WAS PRETTY EASY.

AND 45 MINUTES LATER, I

REFASHIONED A NEW PIECE TO THE

STEM AND HAD DONE AN EPOXY SCARF

ON THERE AND RESHAPED IT AND

BROUGHT THE PLANKING BACK INTO

AND IT WORKED BEAUTIFULLY.

AND IT'S LIKE HA!

>> AND THIS A-HA MOMENT, TURNED

TO HOOSIER WOOD WORKS.

HE'S RESTORED EVERYTHING FROM

WOOD CANOES TO FIBERGLASS KAYAKS

AND HIS ABILITY TO RECREATE

VINTAGE CANOES IS HIS SIGNATURE.

BUT HOOSIER WOOD WORK IS NOT

LIMITED TO WATERCRAFT.

ROGER IS ABLE TO BUILD AND

RESTORE EVERYTHING FROM DOORS TO

SOAP OLDERS.

>> FLY CASES IS PROBABLY ONE OF

MY MAIN STAYS.

I LOVE AS A VETERAN BEING ABLE

TO MAKE FLYCASES FOR VETERANS,

AND I HEAR JUST ABSOLUTELY

WONDERFUL STORIES.

YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES VERY KIND OF

HEART BREAKING.

I DID A FLY CASE FOR A WOMAN IN

CHICAGO, WHOSE FATHER FOUGHT AT

THE BATTLE IN ITALY IN WORLD

WAR II.

I HEAR STORIES, YOU KNOW, ONE

LADY'S -- I THINK IT WAS HER

GRANDFATHER WAS AT PEARL HARBOR.

AND HAD RECENTLY PASSED AWAY.

SO THAT'S VERY, VERY REWARDING.

I ENJOY DOING THAT.

AND I MAKE THEM OUT OF WOOD.

THEY APPRECIATE THAT IT'S MADE

OUT OF WOOD AND MADE IN THE

UNITED STATES AND IT'S MADE BY A

VETERAN.

SO, YEAH.

LITTLE -- YOU KNOW, THINGS THAT

YOU CAN'T NORMALLY FIND SOME

PLACE.

AND, YOU KNOW, I LOVE DOING THE

IMPOSSIBLE.

>> AND EVERY DAY, ROGER GOES

INTO THE WORKSHOP AND CREATES,

BUILDS, AND RESTORES.

SPENDING ALL DAY GETTING HIS

HANDS DIRTY, WORKING WITH THE

THINGS HE'S LOVED FOR DECADES.

>> WOOD IS ALIVE.

IT'S SOMETHING THAT IS

RENEWABLE.

IT GROWS ALL OVER THE PLACE.

IT'S PROBABLY THE MOST EASILY

MALLEABLE MATERIAL THAT WE HAVE,

AND IT IS ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS.

WOOD, YEAH, PEOPLE, YOU KNOW,

FALL ALL OVER THEMSELVES WITH

WOOD.

I THINK WE HAVE AN IMMEDIATE

CONNECTION WITH WOOD, WHATEVER

YOU TOUCH A FINE DINING TABLE, A

PIECE OF FURNITURE.

THERE'S A CONNECTION BETWEEN US.

>> HOOSIER WOOD WORKS DOES WAY

MORE THAN JUST CANOE

RESTORATIONS AND YOU CAN LEARN

MORE ABOUT IT AT

HOOSIERWOODWORKS.COM.

AND AS ALWAYS, WE WOULD

ENCOURAGE YOU TO STAY CONNECTED

WITH US.

HEAD OVER TO JOURNEYINDIANA.ORG.

AND YOU CAN SEE FULL EPISODES

AND SUGGEST STORIES FROM YOUR

NECK OF THE WOODS.

BEFORE WE SAY GOOD-BYE, LET'S

HEAD ON OVER TO THE COOPER SHOP

HERE AT THE WABASH AND ERIE

CANAL SHOP.

MAYBE I CAN TALK THEM INTO

GIVING ME A LESSON.

>> HEY, PETE.

SO I HEAR YOU MIGHT NEED AN

EXTRA SET OF HANDS; IS THAT

RIGHT.

>> YEAH, SURE.

>> WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP?

>> DO YOU WANT TO LEARN HOW TO

MAKE A BUCKET?

>> YEAH.

>> LET'S PUT A STAVE IN HERE.

AND I USE THIS CLIP BECAUSE I

NEED A THIRD HAND TO DO THIS

WITH.

AND IF I CAN GET IT WORK TO

RIGHT, IT WILL HOLD IT.

IF YOU PASS ME THOSE STAYS, WE

WILL PUT THE BUCKET IN AND SEE

HOW IT GOES.

>> DOES IT MATTER WHICH SIDE IS

UP?

>> IT HAS TO BE THE NARROW PART.

>> OH, OKAY.

THEY HAVE A TAPER IN THERE.

WHEN PUT THE HOOPS ON, THEY GET

TIGHT.

>> OH, YEAH, REAL SUBTLE THERE.

>> THERE WE GO.

AND SO THAT WILL GIVE YOU A

BUCKET THAT WILL STAY TOGETHER

AND IF I GOT 'EM DONE RIGHT AND

THEY ARE PUT TOGETHER RIGHT, YOU

SHOULDN'T SEE ANY GAPS.

>> PRODUCTION SUPPORT FOR

"JOURNEY INDIANA" IS PROVIDED

BY:

STREAM JOURNEY INDIANA ON

  • ios
  • apple_tv
  • android
  • roku
  • firetv

FEATURED PROGRAMS

You Are Cordially Invited
Wyld Ryce
Write Around the Corner
WQED Sessions
World Channel
WLIW21 Specials
WLIW Arts Beat
When The World Answered
We Sing
Walk, Turn, Walk
VOCES
Variety Studio: Actors on Actors
Under a Minute
UNC-TV Arts
Tree of Life: A Concert for Peace and Unity