Craft in America

S1 E2 | FULL EPISODE

LANDSCAPE episode

Craft artists depend on their natural environment for both materials and inspiration. This hour looks at the processes through which natural materials become finished works of craft, and what deeper messages may be contained therein. Featured artists include Jan Yager, Kit Carson, David Gurney, George & Mira Nakashima, Richard Notkin, and Timberline Lodge.

AIRED: September 24, 2009 | 0:53:27
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

ANNOUNCER: NEXT ON "CRAFT IN AMERICA"...

WOMAN: I DON'’T LIVE BY THE GRAND CANYON.

I HAVE TO FIND MY BEAUTY WHERE I LIVE.

MAN: THERE'’S A LOT TO BE ANGRY ABOUT IN THIS WORLD.

I DEAL WITH IT BY MAKING ART.

WOMAN 2: FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE, THE CLOSEST CONNECTION THEY HAVE

TO NATURE IS A PIECE OF WOOD IN THEIR HOME ENVIRONMENT.

MAN 2: MY WORK IS A DIRECT REFLECTION

OF THE LANDSCAPE IN WHICH I LIVE.

IT'’S A RAW, NAKED, TRUTHFUL LANDSCAPE.

WOMEN: ♪ '’TIS A GIFT TO BE SIMPLE, '’TIS A GIFT TO BE FREE ♪

♪ '’TIS A GIFT TO COME DOWN WHERE YOU OUGHT TO BE ♪

♪ AND WHEN YOU FIND YOURSELVES IN THE PLACE JUST RIGHT ♪

♪ '’TWILL BE IN THE VALLEY OF LOVE AND DELIGHT ♪

CAPTIONING MADE POSSIBLE BY CRAFT IN AMERICA, INC.

NARRATOR: SWEEPING, PASTORAL VISTAS.

THE REFUSE OF CITY STREETS.

THE LIMBS OF A PARTICULAR TREE.

THE HEADLINES OF THE MORNING PAPER.

ARTISTS LOOK TO THE WORLD AROUND THEM FOR INSPIRATION.

HOW DOES LANDSCAPE INFLUENCE THE ACT OF CREATION?

AND HOW DO ARTISTS TRANSLATE THIS INFLUENCE

INTO A LANDSCAPE SHAPED BY THEIR OWN HANDS?

WOMAN: I THINK WE'’RE THE ONLY ANIMAL THAT SEEMS

TO NEED TO ORNAMENT OURSELVES.

WE SEEM TO NEED TO PUT THINGS ON US, AND SOME OF US NEED

TO MAKE THINGS THAT GET PUT ON US.

I WAS DRAWN TO PHILADELPHIA BECAUSE IT WAS A OLD,

INDUSTRIAL CITY WITH A LOT OF HISTORY.

I LIKE THE LANDSCAPE. I LIKE THE VISTAS.

I THINK IT'’S BEAUTIFUL EVEN IN ITS DECAYED STATE.

IT OFFERS DAILY VISUAL COMPLEXITY,

WHICH--I GUESS I FEED ON THAT.

IT'’S A BUFFET, IT'’S A VISUAL BUFFET FOR A VISUAL THINKER.

THIS FIELD HAS BEEN A DESIGN LABORATORY

IN THE MIDDLE OF A VERY BUSY CITY.

THESE PLANTS WILL BE IN A TIARA THAT I'’M CREATING

CALLED A TIARA OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.

THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, WHICH WAS ONE

OF THE FIRST INSTITUTIONS IN PHILADELPHIA,

THEY WANTED TO PROMOTE USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.

THAT CONCEPT OF KNOWING WHAT MAY BE IMPORTANT

IN THE FUTURE REALLY RESONATED WITH ME.

THIS IS THE MILKWEED PLANT.

THE SAP IS A VERY STICKY SUBSTANCE

THAT'’S USEFUL FOR ADHESIVE.

BUMBLEBEES.

I'’VE STARTED PAYING ATTENTION TO GRASSES.

SWITCHGRASS COULD BE USED FOR AUTOMOTIVE FUEL.

LOOK AT THESE WONDERFUL THINGS. HEH HEH!

SOME PEOPLE CONSIDER THESE WEEDS,

THE WORST WEEDS IN THE WORLD,

BUT I THINK THEY'’RE BEAUTIFUL.

BY DRAWING THIS LEAF,

I'’M GETTING AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FORMS.

THE CONNECTIONS OF THE LEAF TO THE STEM

IS ALWAYS A SURPRISE TO ME.

BY LOOKING CLOSELY AT NATURE,

I HAVE THE BEST TEACHER POSSIBLE.

I'’M SEPARATING EACH OF THESE LEAVES.

I'’LL GLUE THEM ONTO A SHEET OF SILVER.

I'’M GOING TO GET SOME MORE GLUE ON THERE.

IT DRIES PRETTY QUICKLY.

I STUDIED ART AT WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY,

AND ONE PROFESSOR SUGGESTED,

"WHY DON'’T YOU START DRAWING WITH THE SAW?

WHY DON'’T YOU BRING YOUR ART INTO YOUR METAL?"

THIS STACK OF DRAWERS IS A GLIMPSE OF THE JOURNEY

THAT I'’VE BEEN ON AS AN ARTIST

FROM THE EARLY SEVENTIES TO LAST WEEK.

THIS WAS WORK THAT I DID IN THE EARLY 1980s.

ALL OF THESE HAVE ONE ROCK IN THE NECKLACE.

PEOPLE STARTED SENDING ME ROCKS FROM ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE.

THIS WAS MY FIRST CLUE AT THE POWER OF NATURE.

NOW I'’M GOING TO GO TO THE ROLLING MILL.

THIS IS KIND OF LIKE A PRINTER'’S PRESS.

NOW IT'’S LEFT A VERY SUBTLE IMPRESSION OF THE VEINING.

I JUST HAVE TO GET THE GLUE AND THE ACTUAL LEAF OFF.

THEN YOU HAVE A NICE PIECE OF SILVER

THAT IS AN ECHO OF THE LEAF.

FOR ABOUT 7 YEARS,

I PRODUCED A FAIR AMOUNT OF VOLUME,

AND I WAS GETTING SOME COVERAGE IN THE FASHION MAGAZINES.

THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT, I DECIDED I NEEDED TO STOP

AND REFUEL

AND BEGIN THINKING ABOUT A NEW BODY OF WORK.

THAT'’S WHEN I STARTED A HUGE AMOUNT OF RESEARCH

ON THE HISTORY OF JEWELRY,

SEEING HOW IT WAS EXPRESSED IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

AND DIFFERENT TIME PERIODS.

WHETHER IT WAS JUST A SIMPLE FLORAL WREATH

OR A SKIN MARKING, IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN WITH US.

I NEED TO LOOK AT MY COLOR PHOTO COPY

BECAUSE I'’M NOT SURE EXACTLY WHERE THAT STEM COMES IN.

LET'’S SEE.

YEAH.

SOLDERING. THIS IS THE COOL PART.

YOU HAVE TWO SEPARATE PIECES OF METAL, AND BY ADDING A PIECE

OF METAL WITH A LOWER TEMPERATURE, YOU JOIN THEM.

I'’VE DONE ALL THIS RESEARCH, THEN I DECIDED

I NEEDED TO DO WORK THAT WAS AUTHENTIC.

IT HAD TO BE OF ITS PLACE, OF ITS TIME.

SO, I THOUGHT, OK, NOW I'’M GOING TO NARROW IT DOWN,

AND IT'’S GOT TO BE WITHIN A BLOCK OF MY STUDIO.

IT'’S GOING TO BE SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS BLOCK.

IT HAS TO BE HERE.

IF IT'’S NOT HERE, IT'’S NOT REAL.

IS IT TIRE TREADS?

IS IT SIDEWALKS? IS IT PIGEONS?

WHAT AM I GOING TO USE? WHAT AM I GOING TO USE?

I LIVE IN A NEIGHBORHOOD WITH A LOT OF PROBLEMS,

SO I THOUGHT I HAD TO LOOK AT THAT.

AND THEN I REALIZED, HERE IT IS.

IT'’S ALWAYS AT MY DOOR.

EVERY MORNING WHEN I COME IN, I FIND A FEW LAYING THERE--

THESE LITTLE PLASTIC CONTAINERS FOR CRACK COCAINE.

ABOUT THAT TIME,

I HAD FOUND A REALLY BEAUTIFUL BONE NECKLACE.

IT'’S ABOUT A THOUSAND YEARS OLD.

IT WAS MADE BY A NATIVE AMERICAN.

THE PERSON HAD A DINNER

AND CARVED IT AND MADE AN ORNAMENT.

SO IT WAS A COMMON, READILY AVAILABLE MATERIAL.

THE ONE THAT WAS

MY COMMON, READILY AVAILABLE MATERIAL

WERE THE CRACK VIALS.

THESE PIECES ARE THE PLASTIC CAPS

OF THE CRACK VIALS CAST INTO GOLD.

AS I STARTED DOING THIS WORK, PEOPLE STARTED RESPONDING TO IT.

SOME PEOPLE ARE TROUBLED BY IT,

BUT I HAVE TO BRING THESE ISSUES UP,

AND IT'’S NOT GOING TO PLEASE EVERYONE.

THE SURVEY OF THE SIDEWALK FOR CITY FLOTSAM

COULD GET A LITTLE DEPRESSING.

IT'’S TOUGH STUFF.

AND I ASKED, "WHAT'’S BEAUTIFUL HERE?"

I DON'’T LIVE BY THE GRAND CANYON.

I HAVE TO FIND MY BEAUTY WHERE I LIVE.

SO THAT'’S WHEN I STARTED TO LOOK AT THE WEEDS

ACROSS THE WAY FROM THE STUDIO.

SO MUCH OF MY WORK IS THE BALANCE OF MAN AND NATURE,

HOW MUCH WE RELY UPON THE PLANTS AROUND US.

I'’M STILL IN THE PROCESS OF WORKING

ON THE TIARA OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.

I THINK THAT MAKING THINGS WITH YOUR HANDS,

IT'’S A HUMAN, CORE INSTINCT,

A REALLY IMPORTANT PART OF US.

AND I THINK IF WE PAY ATTENTION TO THE TACTILE POWER

USED IN CRAFT, WE WILL COME TO REALIZE

THOSE ARE PROBABLY THE BEST AND THE PUREST VALUES TO HAVE.

[BIRDS CHIRPING]

MAN: ONE OF THE MOST WONDERFUL THINGS ABOUT CLAY IS

YOU MAKE A 3-DIMENSIONAL OBJECT,

AN ACTUAL, TANGIBLE THING.

I LIKE THAT SOLIDITY AND THE FACT

THAT YOU CAN FORM THESE THINGS FROM YOUR MIND.

OCCASIONALLY, YOUR HANDS ALMOST FEEL LIKE THEY'’RE SINGING.

THEY'’LL WORK IN TUNE WITH THE CLAY,

AND IT TAKES ON A LIFE OF ITS OWN WITHOUT THOUGHT.

AND WHEN THAT HAPPENS, IT'’S ALMOST MAGICAL.

I'’M STILL PLAYING.

YOU'’RE NOT SUPPOSED TO REALLY BE PLAYING AND ENJOYING YOURSELF

SO MUCH WHEN YOU'’RE 47 YEARS OLD, BUT I DO.

I JUST ENJOY MANIPULATING THE CLAY

AND MAKING THESE LITTLE PEOPLE AND WORLDS.

THESE ARE GONNA BE THE EYELIDS.

THE FIRST TIME I WORKED WITH CLAY WAS

ONE YEAR IT HAD RAINED A LOT AND A HILLSIDE HAD SLIPPED AWAY,

AND SO WE SAW SOME CLAY.

MY FATHER AND I DUG IT OUT, AND I BROUGHT A BUCKET OF IT HOME,

AND THE FIRST THING I MADE WAS A BUDDHA.

AND I'’D MAKE SURREALISTIC HOUSES,

LITTLE FANTASY PLACES.

MY MOTHER'’S FRIENDS WOULD COME OVER

AND BUY MY POTTERY,

AND SO THAT IS WHAT GOT ME STARTED.

I'’VE ALWAYS BEEN DRAWN TO MEXICAN POTTERY

AND MEXICAN CULTURE...

AND WHEN I STARTED DOING CLAY, I STARTED DOING TREES OF LIFE.

IN MEXICO, THEY WERE MADE FOR WEDDINGS, ESPECIALLY,

AND IT WAS MOSTLY TREES OF LIFE WITH ADAM AND EVE SYMBOLS,

AND SO THEY WOULD DECORATE THE CHURCH WITH THESE.

THEY HAVE THEIR ROOTS IN THE EARTH,

AND THEY'’RE REACHING UP TO HEAVEN,

SO IT ALSO SHOWS MAN'’S QUEST

FOR SPIRITUALITY IN OUR LIVES.

I FEEL LIKE ALL OF THE NATURE THAT'’S LEFT IS

LIKE THE REMNANTS OF THE TREE OF LIFE,

AND WE HAVE TO APPRECIATE ALL OF IT...

AND BE GRATEFUL FOR ALL OF IT.

THERE'’S SO MANY LANDSCAPES AND SO MUCH VARIETY

JUST IN TEN MILES FROM HERE.

I HAVE ALMOST AN INEXHAUSTIBLE SOURCE

OF INSPIRATION.

THE DUNES HERE STRETCH FOR ABOUT 22 MILES

ALL THE WAY TO THE GRAND DUNE,

WHICH IS THE HIGHEST DUNE ON THE WEST COAST.

WHAT I ESPECIALLY LIKE ABOUT THE DUNES IS THE SOLITUDE.

I JUST FEEL FREE TO WANDER WITHOUT A DIRECTION.

I'’LL FIND A NICE HILL AND MEDITATE THERE.

THIS IS THE LUPINE BUSH THAT GROWS ALL OVER THE SAND DUNES

AND HAS THE FLOWERS THAT ARE FROM PURPLE TO WHITE.

YOU CAN'’T COMPETE WITH NATURE,

YOU CAN JUST TRY TO REFLECT IT AND BE A PART OF IT.

[BIRD CHIRPING]

I CAN'’T CAPTURE THE BIRDSONGS IN MY POTTERY

AND THE SOUND OF THE WIND, YOUR FEET ON THE SAND.

I PERSONALLY DON'’T THINK THAT ANY ARTWORK IS

AS BEAUTIFUL AS NATURE.

I CAN'’T DO THAT ON A TILE.

IT'’S JUST TOO INFINITE.

I USE UNDERGLAZES, WHICH ARE PAINTED ON THE GREENWARE.

THIS IS PIECES THAT HAVEN'’T BEEN FIRED.

IT'’S JUST THE DRIED CLAY.

THEN I FIRE THOSE ONE TIME

AND THEN PUT A CLEAR GLAZE OVER THAT,

SO IT'’S FIRED TWICE.

IT COMES OUT OF THE KILN LOOKING LIKE WATER ON STONE.

I CAN REMEMBER AS A CHILD COMING TO TIJUANA.

YOU'’D SEE COLOR EVERYWHERE,

WHEREAS THE CULTURE I CAME FROM, PEOPLE WERE RETICENT,

SO I USED HUNDREDS OF COLORS.

THE RABBIT HAS GOTTEN HERE AHEAD OF ME.

IT STARTED TO EAT THE CARROTS.

HA HA!

I'’VE BEEN BEATEN TO MY CROP.

I CAN GROW TREES FROM SEEDS AND CUTTINGS IN MY YARD,

BUT WITH THE TREES OF LIFE, I CAN CREATE MY OWN TREE.

I'’VE JUST SORT OF GONE OFF FROM THE MEXICAN VERSION

AND ADDED ON MY OWN IMAGES.

THIS ONE'’S THE CALIFORNIA BURNING OAK TREE OF LIFE

BECAUSE OAK TREES NEED FIRE.

SO THERE'’S FLAMES, AND THIS REPRESENTS THE WATER

AND THEN THE CHUMASH SYMBOL FOR THE SUN.

THIS IS AN ADAM AND EVE TREE OF LIFE,

AND HERE'’S THE SERPENT RIGHT HERE.

THIS IS THE FORBIDDEN FRUIT.

IT'’S BROKEN OPEN, SO IT'’S JUST WAITING FOR YOU

TO TAKE A TASTE.

I THINK THAT IF YOU FOLLOW YOUR BLISS,

IF YOU FOLLOW THOSE THINGS THAT TRULY INSPIRE YOU,

IT WILL LEAD YOU TO A GOOD PLACE.

NARRATOR: CRAFT IS NOT ALWAYS AN INDIVIDUAL PURSUIT.

BUILT DURING THE DEPTHS OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION,

TIMBERLINE LODGE IS THE RESULT OF CONTRIBUTIONS

FROM SCORES OF ARTISTS.

IT IS A PRIME EXAMPLE OF HOW CRAFT DRAWS INSPIRATION

FROM THE LANDSCAPE AND CAN BECOME PART

OF THE LANDSCAPE AS WELL.

TIMBERLINE LODGE STANDS TODAY AS A NATIONAL LANDMARK,

BUT IT WAS BORN OUT OF A VERY BASIC NEED:

PEOPLE WANTED A PLACE TO SKI.

MAN: I WAS A SKIER, OF COURSE.

I HAD LEARNED TO SKI IN MONTANA, 1923,

AND SO I WAS A PRETTY EARLY SKIER.

WE USED TO CLIMB UP THE TRAILS TO MOUNT HOOD,

SKI BACK DOWN, AND SOMETIMES WE'’D DO THAT TWICE IN A DAY.

THE DEPRESSION CAME ALONG, AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT

STARTED THE WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION.

THE WPA PUT PEOPLE TO WORK BUILDING HIGHWAYS,

BUILDING TUNNELS, WHATEVER HAD TO BE DONE.

B.J. GRIFFITH WAS THE ADMINISTRATOR, AND HE DECIDED,

"WELL, WOULDN'’T IT BE A GREAT IDEA TO BUILD

A SKI LODGE AND BUILD IT BY HAND?"

WELL, THE WORKERS WERE BROUGHT UP

ON A ROTATION BASIS FOR THE WPA.

TO SIGN UP FOR RELIEF WORK, THEY LOST SOME OF THEIR PRIDE

DOING IT, BUT THAT'’S WHAT THEY HAD TO DO.

THEY WORKED ALL DURING THAT WINTER

IN THE SNOWSTORMS AND THE BAD WEATHER.

MAN: THE POINT WAS TO PUT PEOPLE TO WORK

DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION; NOT ONLY CARPENTERS

AND STONEMASONS AND ENGINEERS,

BUT ALSO CRAFTSPEOPLE, ARTISTS AS WELL.

THEY WERE JUST AS MUCH OUT OF WORK AS EVERYBODY ELSE.

[HAMMERING]

[EQUIPMENT WHIRRING]

WOMAN: MARGERY HOFFMAN SMITH WAS HIRED TO BECOME THE DECORATOR.

AND SHE CAME UP WITH THE IDEA OF FLORA-AND-FAUNA,

PIONEER, INDIAN, NATIVE AMERICAN DESIGNS,

AND SORT OF BRINGING THE OUTDOORS INSIDE.

MARGERY HOFFMAN SMITH: THEY FELT THEY NEEDED A WOMAN'’S ADVICE

ON CERTAIN INTERIOR DETAILS,

WHICH I THINK THEY DID.

AT ONE TIME, I HAD AS MANY AS 200 PEOPLE ON MY ART PROJECT.

EVERYTHING WE DID WAS MADE FOR USE.

WE DIDN'’T BLUEPRINT IT. WE DIDN'’T HAVE TIME TO.

WE HAD PEOPLE ON RELIEF, AND WE HAD TO KEEP THEM BUSY.

WE HAD A FEW VERY FINE ARTISTS.

MAN: GOD, I CAN'’T BELIEVE THEY'’RE STILL HERE.

IT BRINGS BACK...MEMORIES,

SOME VERY PRECIOUS MEMORIES.

MARGERY HOFFMAN SMITH COMMISSIONED ME

TO DO THESE PANELS.

THEY ARE INCISED LINOLEUM,

COLORED WITH VARIOUS LAYERS OF VARNISHES.

THE SUBJECT IS OUTDOOR CAMPING,

IN A RATHER LIGHTHEARTED WAY.

I LIKE TO DO THESE LITTLE TOUCHES OF ANIMALS

AND CREATURES WHO ARE INVOLVED IN THIS,

THIS LITTLE GUY.

WILL NEVER BE ANYTHING LIKE IT AGAIN,

BUT I CAN'’T REALLY BELIEVE

THAT I'’M STILL HERE TO SEE THEM.

JAQUA: TIMBERLINE LODGE IS A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK,

NOT ONLY THE STRUCTURE OF THE LODGE BUT ALSO ALL

THE FURNITURE AND THE TEXTILES; ALL CONTRIBUTE

TO THE HISTORIC QUALITIES OF THE LODGE.

WE CONSIDER THE ARTS AND CRAFTS JUST AS IMPORTANT

AS THE STONE AND THE WOOD AND THE ROCK.

ADAMSON: THE RESTORATION BEGAN IN 1975 WITH THE IDEA

OF REPLICATING THE ORIGINAL TEXTILES.

MARGERY HOFFMAN SMITH KEPT ALL OF HER WATERCOLOR RECORDS,

AND FROM THOSE RECORDS AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS,

WE FIGURED WE COULD RECREATE THEM.

WE HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF FREEDOM,

AND CRAFTSMEN LIKE THAT LITTLE BIT OF FREEDOM,

BUT THEY'’RE CLOSE REPLICAS.

WOMAN: OK, ONE DONE.

ADAMSON: THE WPA WAS SORT OF A MOMENT IN HISTORY.

THE PROUDEST PART THAT I SEE IN ALL THESE YEARS

OF ME DOING RESTORATION IS THAT WE'’RE THE LINK

BETWEEN THOSE GENERATIONS.

WOMAN: THESE ROOMS HAVE BEEN RESTORED

IN THE SPIRIT OF THE ORIGINAL:

RAWHIDE LAMP SHADE COVERS,

LITTLE APPLIQUEÉ TEXTILES.

THIS ONGOING RESTORATION HAS CAUSED THE REVIVAL

OF A LOT OF CRAFTS, INCLUDING, AND MAYBE MOST ESPECIALLY

IN BLACKSMITHING.

[HAMMERING CONTINUES]

MAN: MAKING A RAM'’S HEAD FIRE POKER.

THERE AREN'’T MANY PIECES OF IRONWORK IN THE LODGE

THAT WE HAVEN'’T DUPLICATED AT LEAST ONCE:

THE HANGING LAMPS...

HANDRAILS UP AND DOWN THE STAIRCASE,

A LOT OF THE DOOR HARDWARE.

MUNRO: PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT CAME TO DEDICATE THE LODGE

ON SEPTEMBER 28, 1937.

HENDERSON: IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL DAY.

AND HE LOOKED OUT, YOU KNOW,

WITH A GREAT BIG SMILE TO EVERYONE.

HE SAID...

ROOSEVELT: HERE I AM

ON THE SLOPES OF MOUNT HOOD,

WHERE I'’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO COME.

[CHEERING AND APPLAUSE]

I AM HERE TO DEDICATE TIMBERLINE LODGE,

AND I DO SO AS A MONUMENT TO THE SKILL

AND FAITHFUL PERFORMANCE OF WORKERS ON THE ROLLS

OF THE WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION.

[CHEERING AND APPLAUSE]

LYNCH: TIMES HAVE GONE PAST US PRETTY MUCH NOW.

BUT THIS WILL REMAIN AS A MEMENTO

OF THAT WONDERFUL PERIOD WHEN IT WAS STILL GREEN,

THERE WERE STILL TROUT IN THE STREAMS,

AND IT WILL BE CERTAINLY A SACRED PLACE

FOR THE 20th CENTURY.

MAN: IT'’S LIKE A CATHEDRAL OF CACTUS OUT THERE,

SAGUAROS THAT ARE THE SENTINELS OF THE SONORA.

IT'’S A RAW, NAKED PLACE THAT SPEAKS OF THE TRUTH.

IT'’S A TRUTHFUL LANDSCAPE.

MY WORK IS EQUALLY AS HONEST BECAUSE IT'’S A DIRECT REFLECTION

OF THE LANDSCAPE IN WHICH I LIVE.

I TRY TO DRAW A TRUTHFUL LINE FROM THE DESERT

RIGHT INTO MY HEART AND RIGHT OUT MY GRAVER.

MY PARENTS OWNED THE DUDE RANCH FROM 1946 TO 1960.

AND PEOPLE FROM THE EAST WOULD COME OUT AND ROPE

AND RIDE AND SWIM AND BE PART OF THE DESERT.

SO IT WAS QUITE A GREAT PLACE TO GROW UP.

IT WAS THE PERFECT CHILDHOOD.

I REMEMBER HAVING A LITTLE TOY WITH SOME SCROLL-Y KIND

OF ENGRAVING ON IT AND JUST BEING FASCINATED BY THAT,

BY THE INTRICACY OF IT,

SO I'’M STILL FASCINATED BY THAT.

THE CHILD JUST GOT OLDER.

THE KEY TO ALL THE WORK IS THE DRAWING UNDERNEATH IT.

IT'’S THE REAL ESTATE UNDER ALL THE JEWELRY.

40-FOOT SAGUAROS

AND 30,000-FOOT CLOUDS,

ALL ON THIS 3-INCH PIECE OF PAPER.

THEN I'’LL TRANSFER IT TO THE METAL,

THEN I WILL ENGRAVE THOSE LINES THAT I'’VE TRACED THROUGH.

I HAVE INCLUDED WESTERN MOTIFS IN MY WORK

BECAUSE I LIVE IN THAT LANDSCAPE, IN THAT LIFESTYLE.

BUT I'’M BY NO MEANS JUST A WESTERN ARTIST.

DURING MY HIGH SCHOOL YEARS, I WAS INTRODUCED

TO THE PSYCHEDELIC POSTERS OF THE SIXTIES,

WITH ALL THE MELTING LETTERING

THAT MORPHED INTO PEOPLE

AND GUITARS.

I COULD SEE THAT LINE WORK

COMING INTO MY DRAWINGS.

[MUTTERS INDISTINCTLY]

I STARTED ENGRAVING

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON AT EUGENE.

IT WAS A VERY DISCIPLINED, VERY HARD THING FOR ME TO DO,

A YOUNG MAN, TO BUCKLE DOWN AND STUDY THAT,

BUT I WAS INTRIGUED BY IT.

SO I'’LL GENTLY HEAT THE PIECE,

LOCK THIS IN TIGHT SO IT WON'’T MOVE WHEN I'’M ENGRAVING IT.

ENGRAVER'’S BALL OVER HERE,

WHICH IS BASICALLY A SOPHISTICATED ROTATING VISE.

BUT THE TOOLS ON THIS BENCH HAVEN'’T CHANGED

IN 400 OR 500 YEARS, EXCEPT FOR THE PNEUMATIC GRAVER.

[GRAVER HUMMING]

WHEN YOU'’RE FINALLY DOWN TO THE POINT OF THE GRAVER,

THEN YOU'’RE AT THE RAZOR-SHARP DECISION-MAKING.

THE RESISTANCE PUSHING THE GRAVER ALLOWS YOU

TO CONTROL YOUR LINE BETTER.

I GET A LOT OF INSPIRATION FROM THE ART NOUVEAU,

AND THIS WAS A STYLE THAT WAS PROMINENT

AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY, BUT IT EVOLVED

OUT OF THE CLASSICAL SCROLL.

THIS WOULD BE THE CLASSICAL SCROLL.

THAT SCROLL IS ALWAYS EVEN.

ART NOUVEAU TOOK THAT AND JUST MADE IT A LITTLE MORE FUN.

THEY'’D START WITH THAT CURVE, BUT AS YOU COME IN,

YOU KIND OF KICK IT BACK AND THEN VARY THE LINE WEIGHT--

THIN, THICK, THIN--

SO IT MAKES THE DYNAMICS IN THAT CURVE.

I LIKE TO LEAVE ABOUT A THIRD OF A MILLIMETER

OUTSIDE MY ENGRAVED LINE '’CAUSE IT FORMS A STRONG SILHOUETTE.

YOU BASICALLY HAVE 3 LINES DETERMINING THE SHAPE,

AND I PICKED THAT UP FROM THE ART NOUVEAU POSTERS

OF ALPHONSE MUCHA'’S FAMOUS LADIES

WITH ALL THEIR HAIR AND THE WAY HE OUTLINED THEM.

THAT TRIPLE LINE REALLY HELPS GIVE THE SHAPES

A LOT OF POWER.

I THINK I GRAVITATED TOWARD THE MEDIUM OF JEWELRY

BECAUSE YOU GET TO CONTROL YOUR OWN LITTLE WORLD,

AND YOU'’RE CREATING THIS FINE OBJECT

THAT PEOPLE CAN APPRECIATE.

LOVE WORKING WITH SKELETON THEMES,

SO I DO THIS KIND OF LOOSE VERSION,

MY VERSION OF THE "DAY OF THE DEAD" THEME,

MEXICAN TRADITION OF HONORING THE MEMORIES

OF LOVED ONES WHO'’VE PASSED, AND THEY POKE FUN AT DEATH.

LET'’S LIVE NOW. THAT'’S WHAT IT'’S ALL ABOUT.

THESE BRACELETS HAVE A SPECIAL MESSAGE ON THE INSIDE,

AFFIRMATIONS OF POSITIVITY TO WEAR AGAINST YOUR SKIN.

"THE TREASURE LIES WITHIN YE,"

WHICH IS THE COOL THING ABOUT THE PIRATE IN ALL OF US.

IT'’S GOOD TO FEEL FREE ON WHATEVER OCEAN

YOU'’RE CRUISING ON.

[GRAVER HUMMING]

MY SCULPTURE IS A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT THING

THAN WORKING IN THE JEWELRY, BECAUSE I'’M WORKING

WITH FOUND OBJECTS.

I'’VE AMASSED ABOUT 35 TONS OF STUFF IN MY YARD.

I CALL IT THE LIBRARY OF VISUAL SOLUTIONS

'’CAUSE THAT'’S EXACTLY WHAT IT IS.

ALL THE SCULPTURE I DO I CHOOSE FROM THIS LIBRARY OF SHAPE.

LOOK AT THE IMPLIED... PRIMITIVE FACE.

THESE ARE PICKS.

NOW IT STARTS TO LOOK LIKE A RIB CAGE.

THIS, I'’LL JUST GIVE IT A NEW LIFE

INTO SCULPTURE, PARTS OR WHOLE PIECES.

THIS IS MY BEST PIECE SO FAR.

IT'’S ALL MADE OUT OF CATERPILLAR TRACTOR PARTS.

I THINK I'’LL KEEP IT. HEH HEH!

THERE'’S A DISTINCTION BETWEEN ART AND CRAFT.

IT'’S SO CLOSE BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO KNOW YOUR MEDIUM

WELL ENOUGH TO EXPRESS YOUR HEART, TO MAKE ART.

HEH HEH!

WELL, WE FINALLY GOT THE FINISHED BROOCH,

AND I'’VE SET IT WITH THIS NICE PIECE

OF GREEN CARICO LAKE TURQUOISE,

LIKE SPRING IN THE DESERT.

I'’VE DONE THE SAGUARO WITH THE 18-KARAT GREEN.

THE OTHER SAGUAROS IN THE CLIFF IN THE 18-KARAT PINK GOLD.

I'’VE MADE THAT OVER THE STERLING THUNDERHEADS.

THE SONORAN DESERT AT DUSK.

THIS IS TRULY A PEACEFUL PLACE AND TRULY PARADISE.

I CAN CRANK OUT THAT INTENSE WORK

'’CAUSE I'’VE GOT THE CONTRAST OF THIS BEAUTIFUL,

PEACEFUL PLACE THAT SUSTAINS MY SPIRIT.

I'’VE GOT A LOT TO DO HERE.

[BIRDS CHIRPING]

MAN: THERE'’S A SPIRIT IN TREES THAT'’S VERY DEEP,

AND IN ORDER TO PRODUCE A FINE PIECE OF FURNITURE,

THE SPIRIT OF THE TREE LIVES ON,

AND I CAN GIVE IT A SECOND LIFE

BECAUSE I CAN MAKE AN OBJECT THAT LIVES

AND CAN LIVE FOREVER, POSSIBLY.

WOMAN: DAD REALLY BELIEVED THAT THERE ARE SPIRITS

IN THE WOOD THAT ENHANCE PEOPLE'’S LIVES.

AND, YOU KNOW, NOT EVERYBODY CAN LIVE IN THE WOODS,

BUT THEY CAN LIVE WITH WOOD

AND STAY CONNECTED TO NATURE AND TO THE DIVINE IN THAT WAY.

MAN: GEORGE NAKASHIMA IS ONE OF THE FORMATIVE DESIGNERS

OF THE 20th CENTURY.

HE WAS INFLUENCED BY TRADITIONAL JAPANESE DESIGN,

BY AMERICAN SHAKER DESIGN AND COUNTRY DESIGN.

SO THERE ARE INFLUENCES, BUT HE TOOK THESE THINGS

AND COMBINED THEM IN A WAY THAT NOBODY HAD EVER DONE BEFORE.

-MAYBE TEN, HUH? -YEAH, MAYBE.

MIRA: WELL, I GUESS MY DAD WAS MY PRIMARY MENTOR,

ALTHOUGH WHEN I GREW UP WITH HIM, I DIDN'’T THINK HE

WAS ANYTHING BUT DAD OR THAT HE WAS DOING ANYTHING UNUSUAL

THAT DADS DIDN'’T DO. HA HA HA!

GEORGE: I WAS BORN IN SPOKANE, WASHINGTON.

I'’VE LIVED ALMOST EVERY PLACE ELSE,

SUCH AS FRANCE AND JAPAN

AND THEN INDIA.

MIRA: HIS FIRST TRAINING AT UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

WAS IN FORESTRY, AND AFTER TWO YEARS,

HE SWITCHED TO ARCHITECTURE.

IN 1940, MY FATHER MADE UP HIS MIND

THAT HE WOULD DO FURNITURE BECAUSE HE COULD CONTROL

THE PROCESS FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE END.

TO THIS DAY, IT'’S PROBABLY A LITTLE MORE CONTROL THAN WE

NEED TO HAVE '’CAUSE WE ACTUALLY GO OUT AND LOOK AT TREES.

THESE ARE ALL OURS?

MAN: YEAH, THESE ARE ALL YOUR TREES.

I'’M LOOKING FORWARD TO CUTTING THEM, SORT OF.

MIRA: HA HA HA!

[SAW BUZZING]

MIRA: WE ACTUALLY DECIDE RIGHT ON SITE

HOW WE'’RE GOING TO CUT THEM.

IT'’S AMAZING '’CAUSE YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT'’S GOING

TO BE INSIDE THERE TILL YOU GET THERE.

DAD USED TO TAKE ME ALONG TO THE LUMBER YARD AND HE'’D SAY,

"WELL, WHEN YOU CUT A TREE, IT'’S LIKE CUTTING DIAMONDS,

"AND WE'’LL CUT IT THIS WAY BECAUSE THE GRAIN'’S

MORE BEAUTIFUL THAT WAY."

WOW!

MAN: OH, WOW, LOOK AT THAT.

MIRA: BEAUTIFUL.

GEORGE: I WAS IN TOKYO, AND I MET A YOUNG LADY THERE,

AND WE RETURNED TO THIS COUNTRY AND WE BECAME MARRIED.

AND THEN WAR BROKE OUT, PEARL HARBOR.

AND ONE OF THE RESULTS WAS THAT WE WERE PUT

INTO CONCENTRATION CAMPS, ABOUT WHICH

MOST AMERICANS DIDN'’T KNOW ANYTHING.

MIRA: IN THE CAMP, DAD WOULD TEACH THIS FELLOW WOODWORKER

HOW TO DESIGN THINGS, AND THE FELLOW WOULD TEACH HIM

HOW TO MAKE THINGS, SO THEY DEVELOPED INVENTIVE WAYS

OF USING THE OLD ARMY COTS AND SCRAP MATERIALS.

I STILL HAVE THE TOY BOX THAT HE MADE FOR ME

WHEN I WAS IN CAMP.

-COMING DOWN. -GO FOR IT.

MIRA: ART HAS TO BE BEAUTIFUL.

"CRAFT" IMPLIES, IN MY FATHER'’S DEFINITION,

THAT IT SHOULD BE SOMETHING THAT'’S PRACTICAL

AND USEFUL IN LIFE.

[SAW BUZZES]

WHEN DAD FIRST HAD HIS SHOW AT THE AMERICAN CRAFT MUSEUM,

IT WAS THE FIRST TIME IT WAS EXHIBITED

AS IF IT WERE WORKS OF ART.

UP UNTIL THEN, IT HAD JUST BEEN FURNITURE.

AIBEL: GEORGE HAS REALLY IDENTIFIED WITH THE CONCEPT

OF THE NATURALISTIC TOP LAID ON TOP

OF A VERY ARCHITECTURAL BASE.

IT'’S BOTH NATURAL AND MAN-MADE SIMULTANEOUSLY.

YEAH, I WORKED WITH GEORGE FOR 17 YEARS OR SO.

ONE OF THE APPROACHES THAT GEORGE TOOK WAS

LOOKING FOR THE SOUL OF THE TREE.

MEANS THAT THE WOODWORKER HAS TO NOT IMPOSE

HIS OWN THOUGHTS ON THE TREE...

BUT THE TREE IS GIVEN A CHANCE TO COME FORTH WITH ITS STORY,

AND IN THAT DIALOGUE, CONVEYS SOMETHING TO THE WOODWORKER.

MIRA: I WAS PRETTY MUCH THE UNDERSTUDY.

HE NEVER TOLD ME THE WAY TO DO THINGS,

HE WOULD JUST CHANGE A LINE OR HE WOULDN'’T TELL ME

WHY HE CHANGED THE LINE.

AND I CAN'’T COUNT THE NUMBER OF TIMES I WAS FIRED--

HA HA!-- WHILE DAD WAS ALIVE.

IT WAS VERY GOOD DISCIPLINE. HA HA!

IN 1984, HE CAME ACROSS AN ENORMOUS WALNUT LOG,

AND HE HAD THIS DREAM TO MAKE PEACE ALTARS

FOR EACH OF THE CONTINENTS OF THE WORLD.

-YEAH, THAT'’S GOOD. -PRETTY FLAT.

-NO TWIST. -NO TWIST.

MIRA: HE THOUGHT, IF PEOPLE HAD AN ALTAR

WHERE THEY COULD RESOLVE THEIR DIFFERENCES,

THAT WE WOULD BE THAT MUCH CLOSER TO WORLD PEACE.

HE MADE THE FIRST ALTAR, WHICH WAS INSTALLED

AT THE CATHEDRAL ST. JOHN THE DIVINE IN 1986.

HE WAS TRYING TO NEGOTIATE SENDING A PEACE ALTAR TO RUSSIA

WHEN HE PASSED AWAY IN 1990.

I HOPE WE CAN FIND SOMETHING ELSE THAT MATCHES.

OTHERWISE, I THINK...

THE REASON WE BUILT THIS SHED IS THAT WHEN DAD PASSED AWAY,

THERE WAS A HUGE STACK OF LUMBER SITTING OUT IN THE RAIN,

AND WE HAD NOWHERE TO PUT IT.

-NICE, SMALLER BOARD... -SO I THOUGHT MOMENTARILY

OF MAYBE SELLING IT AT THAT POINT.

PRETTY.

AND THEN WE THOUGHT, WELL, YOU KNOW,

THAT'’S DAD'’S LAST LEGACY.

YEAH, THAT'’D BE NICE.

-THAT'’S A NICE COLOR. -YEAH.

EVERETT: AFTER THE LOG IS CUT, IT HAS TO AIR-DRY FOR AT LEAST

A YEAR TO TWO YEARS JUST TO STABILIZE ITSELF.

MIRA: ONCE THEY'’RE DRIED, I'’LL SELECT THEM

FOR EACH PARTICULAR JOB THAT WE DO, AND IT'’S A LONG PROCESS.

AIBEL: MIRA NAKASHIMA IS REALLY THE ONLY TRUE HEIR

TO THE NAKASHIMA LEGACY.

MIRA IS NOW FUNCTIONING IN EXACTLY THE SAME WAY

THAT GEORGE DID,

MAKING DECISIONS ABOUT HOW TO CUT THE BOARD...

MIRA: GET RID OF THOSE CORNERS A LITTLE BIT.

AIBEL: WHERE TO PUT THE LEGS, WHERE TO PUT THE BUTTERFLIES.

SHE'’S THE ONLY PERSON WHO IS DESIGNING

IN THE NAKASHIMA STYLE.

MIRA: STRETCH.

AIBEL: HER WORK IS SOMEWHAT DIFFERENT

THAN HER FATHER'’S WORK.

WHAT THAT MEANS, REALLY, IS THE PIECES THAT ARE COMING OUT

OF THE STUDIO TODAY ARE MIRA NAKASHIMA PIECES.

MIRA: I JUST SORT OF PICKED UP THE PIECES WHERE DAD LET THEM

FALL AND HAVE TRIED TO CONTINUE HIS TRADITION

AND EXPLORE IT A LITTLE FURTHER.

IN INDIA, THEY BELIEVE THAT BEAUTY IS

MAN'’S CONNECTION TO THE DIVINE.

DAD'’S WHOLE OPERATION HERE HAS BEEN--

HE CALLED IT HIS KARMA YOGA,

HIS WAY OF BEING, WHICH IS A FORM OF MEDITATION.

SOME PEOPLE GET IT, SOME PEOPLE DON'’T,

BUT I HOPE THAT THAT TRADITION CAN CONTINUE SOMEHOW

BECAUSE IT'’S VERY MEANINGFUL, IT'’S VERY IMPORTANT

IN OUR WORLD TODAY.

GEORGE: AND IF WE END UP WITH SOMETHING THAT PLEASES US

AND PLEASES OTHERS, UH, WE FEEL THAT THE DESTINY

OF A PIECE OF WOOD HAS BEEN...FULFILLED.

MAN: HUMAN HISTORY IS FILLED WITH FOLLIES...

AND WE KEEP REPEATING THE SAME DAMN MISTAKES

OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

WE DON'’T EVEN WAIT FOR A GENERATION TO PASS SOMETIMES

BEFORE WE LAUNCH INTO A NEW MISTAKE.

THERE'’S A LOT TO BE ANGRY ABOUT IN THIS WORLD.

THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO, UH, DEAL WITH THAT ANGER.

I DEAL WITH IT BY MAKING ART.

THERE'’S A RICH AND TERRIFIC HISTORY

OF ARTISTS PROTESTING WAR.

I FEEL PRIVILEGED TO BE A PART OF THAT.

I'’M OFTEN ASKED WHY I MAKE TEAPOTS.

WELL, I USE THE TEAPOT ONLY METAPHORICALLY, REALLY.

I'’M MORE INTERESTED IN CONVEYING IDEAS

THAN I AM TEA.

IN 1980, I FIRST CAME TO MONTANA.

I LOVE THE EXPANSIVE LANDSCAPE,

BUT I DON'’T KNOW THAT THE LANDSCAPE

REALLY AFFECTS THE WORK.

I'’M WORKING OUT OF A POLITICAL LANDSCAPE, REALLY.

I'’M GETTING GOOD REDUCTION.

I'’VE REDUCED THE OXYGEN LEVEL IN THE KILN.

THE FLAMES JUST COME JUMPING OUT

BECAUSE THEY'’RE LITERALLY SEEKING OXYGEN.

I'’M JUST PUTTING A LITTLE MORE GAS IN

SO IT'’LL FIRE A LITTLE QUICKER.

I DO ABOUT A 4-DAY FIRING CYCLE.

DRIVES MY WIFE CRAZY.

YOU KNOW, I GET UP EVERY TWO HOURS TO CHECK THE KILN.

I WAS BORN IN CHICAGO SHORTLY AFTER WORLD WAR II.

[FILM PROJECTOR WHIRRING]

I'’VE ALWAYS MADE THINGS BY HAND.

WHEN I WAS A KID, I WAS CONSTANTLY MAKING MODELS.

MY FATHER WAS AN IMMIGRATION LAWYER.

WE HAD MANY GIFTS FROM CHINESE CLIENTS IN OUR HOUSE,

AND SO, FROM A VERY EARLY AGE, I BECAME VERY FASCINATED

WITH THE INTRICATE, WITH DETAIL,

WITH VERY TIGHT, METICULOUS CARVING.

WHEN I WAS A KID, I REMEMBER SEEING

THE VERY STARK FOOTAGE OF THE DISCOVERY

OF THE CONCENTRATION CAMPS,

THE PILES OF BODIES.

IT HAD A VERY, VERY STRONG IMPACT ON MY LIFE.

I'’M CARVING EARS.

THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT CLAYS THAT I LAYER

SO THAT WHAT I GET IN THE END IS SOMETHING THAT LOOKS

VERY MUCH LIKE SEDIMENTARY ROCK.

IT'’S PART OF THIS ONGOING PROJECT THAT I CALL

"THE LEGACY PROJECT,"

AND IT CONSISTS OF A PILE OF EARS.

THE PILE KEEPS CHANGING,

AND THERE'’S SO MANY DIFFERENT LAYERS OF MEANING;

YOU KNOW, THE FACT THAT EARS HAVE LONG BEEN USED

AS A WAY OF COUNTING THE DEAD IN WAR.

THE OTHER THING ABOUT THE PILE OF EARS IS I WAS VERY MUCH

TRYING TO RECAPTURE THE SENSE OF THE PILE OF SHOES

AFTER THE HOLOCAUST, THE REMAINS OF PEOPLE THAT ARE GONE.

SO THEY ARE EARS THAT ARE STONE-DEAF.

THEY'’RE NOT LEARNING THE LESSONS THAT ARE ALL AROUND US.

YOU KNOW, I WORK FROM A PLACE THAT'’S DEEP INSIDE ME,

THAT I'’M VERY PASSIONATELY ANGRY ABOUT.

I'’M PISSED OFF THAT THERE ARE NUCLEAR WEAPONS, YOU KNOW?

IF AN ARTIST CAN'’T SAY WHAT THEY REALLY FEEL IN THEIR ART,

YOU KNOW, WHAT THE HELL IS THE POINT?

MAN: OK, LIFT HER.

-OK, GOT IT. -OK.

NOTKIN: THE VESSEL IS REALLY THE PRIMARY CANVAS OF CERAMICS,

AND THE TEAPOT IS THE MOST COMPLEX OF VESSELS.

YOU CAN REALLY PLAY WITH A LOT OF IMAGES AND JUXTAPOSE

A LOT OF DIFFERENT IMAGES TO BUILD A NARRATIVE.

URBAN DESTRUCTION FROM WORLD WAR II

BECOMES A TEAPOT.

THIS IS THE HANDLE.

UH, THE LID RIGHT HERE, THIS KIND OF LIFTS OUT.

AND, UH, THIS RUBBLE CREATES A VESSEL WHICH CONNECTS WITH

THIS KIND OF TILTED, BROKEN CHIMNEY, WHICH BECOMES A SPOUT.

THE TEAPOT WAS LITERALLY INVENTED IN YIXING, CHINA,

ABOUT 1500 A.D.

SUDDENLY, THERE IS AN EXPLOSION OF CREATIVITY;

ALL DIFFERENT FORMS, FROM SEGMENTED FORMS

TO NATURAL FORMS TO GEOMETRIC FORMS.

I'’M INSPIRED BY THESE POTS.

I'’M INSPIRED BY THEIR CRAFTSMANSHIP,

THE FINESSE OF LINE, THE COMPOSITIONS.

BUT WHILE I IMITATE THE POTS IN A TECHNICAL

AND SOMETIMES AESTHETIC SENSE, I'’M NOT MAKING YIXING POTS.

I'’M TRYING TO MAKE POTS

THAT HAVE A SEPARATE CULTURAL IDENTITY,

THAT SPEAK OF MY TIMES,

MY COUNTRY, MY CONCERNS.

THESE ARE GOING TO BE FOR CLAY TILES,

IN FRAMED EDITIONS.

PRESS MOLDING IS KIND OF LIKE PRINTMAKING,

REALLY, IN CERAMIC.

I LIKE THE HAND NATURE OF THIS PROCESS.

THERE ARE WAYS OF MECHANICALLY DOING THIS,

WHERE THEY COME OUT PERFECT

AND THEY'’D BE MUCH QUICKER TO PRODUCE,

BUT I'’D LOSE A LITTLE BIT OF THAT HANDMADE QUALITY.

YOU KNOW, WHEN I WAS IN GRADUATE SCHOOL,

THERE WAS SORT OF A DISDAIN FOR CRAFTSMANSHIP,

KIND OF CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO AT THE TIME.

PEOPLE SAID MY WORK WAS TOO SMALL, TIGHT, AND PRECIOUS,

AND I TOOK IT AS A COMPLIMENT.

THERE WAS A CHINESE MASTER WHO ONCE SAID THAT

"TO MAKE ART, YOU DEVELOP AN INFALLIBLE TECHNIQUE

AND THEN PLACE YOURSELF AT THE MERCY OF INSPIRATION,"

AND I LIKE THAT.

YOU KNOW, A WORK OF ART CAN'’T REST ON TECHNIQUE ALONE.

THERE HAS TO BE A STRONG IDEA, A STRONG CONCEPT BEHIND THAT.

[CRICKETS CHIRPING. DISTANT DOG BARKS]

OH, A LOT OF CRACKING ON THIS.

THERE'’S A HIGH DEGREE OF LOSS WITH THIS TECHNIQUE.

THIS IS A PRETTY ONE.

OUR HUMAN SPECIES IS VERY AMAZING.

YOU KNOW, WE HAVE THESE TWO POTENTIALS

BETWEEN CREATION AND DESTRUCTION.

IF ALL CREATIVE PEOPLE STOPPED MAKING ART,

I REALLY THINK WE'’D PERISH AS A SPECIES.

I'’M NOT GONNA MAKE THE EAR THAT SAVES THE WORLD,

I'’M NOT GONNA MAKE

THE TEAPOT THAT SAVES THE WORLD,

BUT, YOU KNOW, GANDHI SAID YOU DROP ENOUGH GRAINS

INTO THE MIGHTIEST MACHINE-- GRAINS OF SAND--

AND YOU'’LL STOP THAT MACHINE, SO I FIGURE, OK,

THIS IS MY CONTRIBUTION TO MAN'’S COLLECTIVE CREATIVITY.

[WIND]

YAGER: WORKING WITH OUR HANDS HAS ALWAYS BEEN WITH US,

AND IT WILL REMAIN.

GURNEY: I TRY TO CELEBRATE THIS BEAUTIFUL EARTH

AND IT NEVER CEASES TO INSPIRE ME.

CARSON: YOU PERFECT YOUR CRAFT,

AND THEN YOU START PUTTING YOUR VOICE INTO IT

AND YOUR LINE AND YOUR HEART.

NOTKIN: THE REAL STRUGGLE, I THINK, IS THE CREATIVE STRUGGLE.

IT'’S GOT TO COME FROM WITHIN.

YOU'’RE THE ONLY ONE WHO KNOWS YOUR PASSIONS.

MIRA: AND IT'’S TRANSFERRING THAT FEELING TO OTHER PEOPLE

SO THAT THEY CAN UNDERSTAND THE BEAUTY OF THE DIVINE.

WOMEN: ♪ '’TIS A GIFT TO BE SIMPLE ♪

♪ '’TIS A GIFT TO BE FREE ♪

♪ '’TIS A GIFT TO COME DOWN WHERE YOU OUGHT TO BE ♪

♪ AND WHEN YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THE PLACE JUST RIGHT ♪

♪ '’TWILL BE IN THE VALLEY OF LOVE AND DELIGHT ♪

♪ WHEN TRUE SIMPLICITY IS GAINED ♪

♪ TO BOW AND TO BEND ♪

♪ WE SHAN'’T BE ASHAMED ♪

♪ TO TURN, TURN WILL BE OUR DELIGHT ♪

♪ TILL BY TURNING, TURNING, WE COME ROUND RIGHT... ♪

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