Colores

FULL EPISODE

Ray and Angela Pérez

Father and daughter, Ray and Angela Pérez, from Albuquerque’s San José parish, celebrate Christmas with a performance of Las Posadas.

AIRED: December 14, 2019 | 0:26:54
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TRANSCRIPT

Funding for COLORES was provided in part by:

Frederick Hammersley Foundation ...and Viewers Like You

>>THIS TIME, ON COLORES!

>>FATHER AND DAUGHTER, RAY AND ANGELA PÉREZ, FROM

ALBUQUERQUE'S SAN JOSÉ PARISH, CELEBRATE

CHRISTMAS WITH A PERFORMANCE OF LAS POSADAS.

>>MURALS, SCULPTURE AND NEON, RENO'S HIGH ENERGY

PUBLIC ART PROJECTS KNOW NO BOUNDRIES.

>>VISITORS TO THE MENIL DRAWING INSTITUTE EXPLORE

WHAT A DRAWING IS AND IT'S POTENTIAL.

>>TRADITIONAL FOLKLORE DANCES...

BAILE FOLCLORICO, BRIDGE GENERATIONAL DIVIDES AND

CONNECTS YOUNG PEOPLE TO THEIR MEXICAN HERITAGE.

>>IT'S ALL AHEAD ON COLORES!

>>A HOLIDAY GIFT OF MUSIC AND STORY.

>>Ray Perez: One of the things that inspires me about

The Posadas is the gathering of people.

>>Gwyneth Doland: Tell me what Las Posadas is about?

What is the story?

>>Ray Pérez: The word in Spanish "posada" means a

lodge, an inn.

And this is what we, this is what Mary and Joseph

were doing no?

The story goes that they were looking for a place

to stay to have the baby Jesus, no?

It dates back to the 1500's.

They came from Spain.

Spain brought it to the Indians in Mexico and the

Indians there started doing a novena, which is a

novena, for nine days.

A novena means just like I guess, ah something that

you pray every night.

It's a custom that that we've followed for many years.

It just, we reenact the way of Mary and Joseph then.

What we do is we dress up the kids.

We have kids that dress up like little angels.

We have shepherds that dress like shepherds and

then we have Mary and Joseph dressed like them.

I think it's a little deeper than that you know.

It's not just because we take the angels and Mary

and Joseph like that.

I think that we really get to feel is the light of

Christ which is supposed to be you know, he is the

light and this is why we do it, I do it, for that

reason no?

>>Gwyneth Doland: And how did you begin performing

Las Posadas.

>>Angela: My parents have been in the choir since

the year I was born and so I just grew up going

through Posadas and I was that little girl who was

an angel and as I get older I was Virgin Mary

and I started playing the violin when I was 8.

>>Gwyneth: How did you get started?

>>Ray: The priest that that came in.

He came in from from, he was he was he was born and

raised here in Alameda, New Mexico, in Albuquerque.

He wanted, he wanted to bring this tradition back

you know and I think that basically the main reason:

there was something to have community, build community.

This is one form of the priests and the people

around us going to different houses and

meeting people where they are at.

It's been like 47 years for me, so...

We visit we the homeless, we visit like Paloma

Blanca down the road here.

We bring we the music to them and it gives them a

big lift you know.

It just touches you. You know?

>>Gwyneth: This is such an old tradition.

Why is it still relevant to you now?

>>Angela: It's just a reflection, just of every

year we go through and repeat the history.

It's a way of bringing it back to life again and

just teaching, sharing the story over and over again.

>>Ray: People in the choir tell me you know, it's not

a Christmas if we don't have Posada.

It's just something that's part of you, anymore you know?

It's not, you miss it just like I guess, I'm missing

like pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving, no?

>>Angela: Yeah, like you don't know what to do.

It's community, because anybody can come and we

pass out the paper so anybody can sing along if

they want to.

>>Gwyneth Doland: Does it bring different groups of

people in the community together?

>>Ray: Oh yeah. We have all races you know?

We don't tell anybody you can't come because you're

like this or like that you know?

You don't ever know who you're going to touch and

you know people come up to us and say, "you know this

was the most beautiful thing I've ever seen," you know?

>>Ray: The things that you really see when you're

actually going to people's homes and bringing the

Posadas - they open up with their own lives.

They may ask for Posadas because they want to, they

want to call people over, maybe a friend, a neighbor

that they're not doing very well with them, it

makes me feel that I'm doing something that God

wants me to do you know?

We figure that God gives us talents not just to

keep for ourselves but to share.

Things have changed a lot you know within the few

years you know we've gotten a lot of the

immigrants coming in and things like that.

San José has been a place of worship for everybody

and they cater a lot to them and I think we used

to have like three English masses and one Spanish

mass and now it's turned around.

Now there's three Spanish masses and one English and

we're out you know we've just been able to mix and

mingle and to me it's no different, you know, just,

we have to be generous of what we have, no?

>>Gwyneth: So why is it important to you to carry

on this tradition?

>>Ray: The youth need something and they need

somebody to teach that something you know?

People with kids have to know that.

We have to know where we came from.

What, what we used to do and what we're still doing

and what we should keep doing.

>>Angela: You have to think about the future so

we have to carry the torch if you will and pass on

just sharing our talents and hopefully the

tradition keeps going because Christmas is not

just gift-giving.

There's other forms of giving and this is part of it.

It's the time of reflection with these, the

Novena and that's what a Novena is.

It's, it's giving yourself time to pray about

something and then when the day comes it's, you

know, it's Christmas it means something, there's a

reason behind it.

>>BRINGING TO LIFE THE CHARACTER OF A CITY.

>>Megan Berner: The Art Belongs Here grants

initiative is a neighborhood creative

place making project for public art.

The idea behind it is to get people in

neighborhoods to work with artists and collaborate

with each other to create art projects that exist

outdoors in public space in their neighborhood.

Projects that reflect community identity,

heritage, the personality or character of a place.

One of the projects that got approved is a

sculpture titled "Good Luck Horseshoe." That's

happening, um, at the Reno Rodeo.

So, the Reno Rodeo partnered with artist

Michael Gray to bring this sculpture to Reno and

permanently locate it.

>>Michael Gray: We had to use the chipping hammer to

bust out the concrete so that it would sit flat.

And then we drilled holes on the outsides for

concrete anchors.

>>Deb Armstrong: And then we put the, the banner on

the top for stability.

>>Gray: It keeps the horseshoe from separating

because you know people are gonna climb all over it.

>>Armstrong: The "Good Luck Horseshoe," to me, is

a real piece of inspiration I think that

Mike had to take something out to the Black Rock

Desert that sort of symbolized the horses of

our area, the Western culture, and things like

that, and be able to provide it to the people

that were at Burning Man.

And it's just completely appropriate that it ends

up full circle back here.

Mike was able to source the materials like the,

the horseshoes that are in the "Good Luck Horseshoe"

are all repurposed horseshoes that he

collected from different farriers and different

people with horses in the area.

But, a lot of those folks that are our neighbors

they have horses that are in the drill team and

things like that, so the likelihood that those

horse shoes have been in the actual Re- Reno Rodeo

grounds are probably pretty good.

>>Berner: There's a project happening along

Fourth Street, an artist that's working on that is

actually doing bike benches.

So, he's taking bike parts and making them into these

really cool benches.

>>Mike Burke: I'm involved with the Reno bike project

and the brewery arts district on Fourth Street.

We're putting out a series of artistic bike benches

that are also bike racks.

It provides somewhere for cyclists to park on Fourth

Street and produces some art for the community and

promotes cycling in the area.

Today I'm assembling the first finished version of

our latest prototype.

While working on this project a lot of things

have affected our overall design.

We've had to take into account ADA regulations,

as well as sidewalk regulations in developing

a bench that will conform to the codes, as well as

be a piece of art and be functional as far as

parking a bike, and noticeable that it is a

bike rack and a bench and for cyclists.

>>Berner: Another project that's happening is on

Wedekind road at the 395 overpass.

And that is a community mural project.

It's "Be The Change Project," working with

artist Asa Kennedy.

>>Kyle Chandler-Isacksen: The mural is going to be a

Day of the Dead themed piece.

The wall behind us is just, it's ugly, and it's

always been ugly, and it gets tagged and it gets

painted over gray and it gets tagged again and that

can easily be changed.

And as we talk to the community and kind of got

some feedback, people were really positive about the

idea and we just, we just went with it after that.

>>Asa Kennedy: About a week or two ago we went to

the elementary school, kind of ran through the

concept with them about what it was gonna be and

went through some small exercises asking them what

images, what elements and ideas do you kids think

represent this cultural festival.

And from then we went from the answers being provided

to them drawing.

Part of their actual more direct inclusion is gonna

be structuring some of the panels and the work for

students own original work where my job as the lead

artist is to come in and weave all that together.

>>Chandler-Isacksen: Part of it is incorporating

their own designs and bringing their, their

ideas right to the wall itself so that at the end

of the day, when, when the mural is done, and they're

walking past it to go to school, they can say, you

know, I did that.

>>Berner: We see public art as being an integral

part of city life.

>>Burke: A lot of times while I'm working on

public art, people, when they see it, they get so

excited and they really do feel like a sense of

ownership over some of the art.

>>Armstrong: It's good for the people.

It's good for the town.

It's good for the city itself.

I mean it's, art makes people happy.

>>Gray: I want people to come here that haven't,

that aren't from here, and they're traveling and visiting.

They see it and its character. It's our city.

>>DRAWING, A SHARED EXPERIENCE.

>>Rebecca Rabinow: Drawings, in many ways,

are a very personal way for a, a viewer to connect

with an artist, but they're also an integral

part of our experience as humans.

Every culture has drawing as a part of it.

We all draw.

And this is a building that celebrates that.

The Menil Drawing Institute was founded at

the end of 2007 to promote modern and contemporary drawing.

It has created many exhibitions.

It has published catalogues that have

traveled around the world.

And so now we inaugurate an actual physical space

for that institute, and it's devoted to the

acquisition, the study, the exhibition,

conservation, and storage of drawings.

So, it's very purpose-built architecture.

>>Sharon Johnston: The Drawing Institute is an

interesting building type, um, both because of its

focus on, on drawing and works on paper, but also its scale.

It's 30,000 square feet.

So, it's, it's really somewhere between a house

and a museum in terms of its size.

>>Mark Lee: You know, when we studied the campus, we

also noticed there is a kind of, um, liturgical

quality about the building types.

You know, certainly the Rothko Chapel and

Byzantine Chapel is a liturgical type.

The Flavin installation has this crypt like quality.

You know, this whole idea of sacred and domestic

kind of came together in this building.

>>Johnston: I mean we're sitting in a room that's

got light sort of coming from every direction.

I think that gives it a sense of time, the

changing weather.

I mean there's a kind of connection to the outside

that's very different here than a more typical museum.

Because it's a space for work and scholars and

conservation, each one of those programs has a

different light need, so I think that's something

that, that defines the Drawing Institute is the

qualities of light and atmosphere that are very

calibrated, but, um, have a quite a wide range

that's from the museum institutional condition to

a domestic setting.

>>Lee: Paper is very fragile and sensitive to light.

Drawing curators will tell you that the room for the

paper has to have a, a light level of like

five-foot candles or less.

So, when you're outside in the Houston sun it could

be as high as 15,000 to 18,000-foot candles.

So, I think this whole procession of having a

courtyard that is partially indoors and

partially outdoors working in concert with the trees

are ways to slowly help your eye adjust as you

come and finally to the gallery that you don't

feel like you're entering a dark room.

>>Rabinow: So, we inaugurate the building

with an exhibition of drawings by Jasper Johns.

They're drawn entirely from the Menil's permanent

collection, promised gifts, and then seven

loans from the artist himself.

He's one of the greatest artists of our time.

Also, on view is a wall drawing by Roni Horn

created this year, so as contemporary as you can

get, that is an eclectic group of aphorisms, which

are silk screened onto a wall.

This is the first of a series of wall drawing

commissions that we will have in this building.

And then the third work on view in our main space is

a sculpture by Ruth Asawa.

And you might say, why, why have a sculpture in a

building devoted to drawings?

She used wire to create these amazing orbs that

are suspended in space and she always referred to

that work as drawing in space.

So here you have an artist who pushes the, the

typical definition of a drawing as an original

work of art on a paper support in an entirely new way.

We're pushing the definition of drawing

because this is a building that will really explore

what a drawing is and what its potential could be.

>>KEEPING CULTURE ALIVE!

(SPEAKING SPANISH)

>> MY MOM TOLD ME STORIES THAT SHE WANTED TO DANCE

WHEN SHE WAS LITTLE AND THAT SHE DANCED THE HAPPY

CAUSE SHE DANCED.

>> WHEN I WAS YOUNGER, I-IT WAS REWARDING TO BE

ON THE STAGE AND TO BE IN FRONT OF THOUSANDS OF

PEOPLE AND, LIKE, I USED TO GET, LIKE, SO MUCH

CONFIDENCE AND ENERGY FROM THAT AND MOST RECENTLY I

FIND IT REWARDING, LIKE, TRANSFERRING ALL

THAT TO MY STUDENTS.

THE SPARKLE THAT THEY HAVE IN THEIR EYE BEFORE THEY

GO ON THE STAGE AND, LIKE, THE BUTTERFLIES THEY GET

IN THEIR STOMACH IS WHAT I USED TO HAVE AS A KID, AND

I'M JUST SO EXCITED THAT I'M ABLE TO PASS THAT ON

TO THE NEXT GENERATION OF STUDENTS.

THE SORT OF EXPERIENCE THAT IS VERY UNIQUE AND

VERY COMMON IN COLUMBUS.

(SPEAKING SPANISH)

>> THIS IS THE HAT WE HAVE TO WEAR.

IT'S CALLED A SOMBRERO AND THEN A REBOZO THEN IF YOU

WANTED, YOU COULD WEAR BRACELETS AND GOLD

earring, THE SUIT, uh, I DON'T WHAT IT'S CALLED,

AND THEN THE SKIRT AND THE SHOES.

WE'RE SUPPOSED TO BRING THE BRAIDS, LIKE THIS.

(SPEAKING SPANISH)

>> AS A SECOND GENERATION MEXICAN AMERICAN, YOU

KNOW, I THINK IT'S IMPORTANT TO CONNECT TO

OUR CULTURES, MAKE SURE IT DOESN'T GET LOST.

SO IT'S ONE OF THE GREATEST WAYS TO DO THAT

AND TO REALLY EDUCATE THE GREATER COMMUNITY ABOUT

HOW DIVERSE AND UNIQUE EACH PART OF LATIN AMERICA IS.

>> IT'S DISCOVERING, WE'RE DISCOVERING.

MY MOM WANTS ME TO KEEP GOING DANCING AND GROW UP

LIKE MS.PATINO.

(SPEAKING SPANISH)

>>TO VIEW THIS AND OTHER COLORES PROGRAMS GO TO:

New Mexico PBS dot org and look for COLORES under

What We Do and Local Productions.

Also, LOOK FOR US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM.

"UNTIL NEXT WEEK, THANK YOU FOR WATCHING."

>>Funding for COLORES was provided in part by: Frederick

Hammersley Foundation...and Viewers Like You

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