Colores

FULL EPISODE

Nani Chacon

Calling for unity, Nani Chacon contemplates cultural and political connections with her mural ¡Resiste!

AIRED: October 17, 2020 | 0:26:33
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

FREDERICK HAMMERSLEY FOUNDATION...

...AND VIEWERS LIKE YOU

CALLING FOR UNITY, NANI CHACON CONTEMPLATES

CULTURAL AND POLITICAL CONNECTIONS WITH HER MURAL

¡RESISTE!

SCULPTOR ED DWIGHT WAS TO BECOME OUR COUNTRY'S

FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN ASTRONAUT

UNTIL A NATIONAL TRAGEDY CHANGED HIS LIFE.

PUSHING DESIGN, ENGINEERING, HORSEPOWER

AND ADVANCING CIVIL RIGHTS,

THE INDY 500 DEFIES LIMITATIONS.

CHALLENGING EXPECTATIONS, FEATURING INCLUSIVITY THE

MARGORIE BOOK CONTINUING EDUCATION GROUP CREATES

THEATRICAL ROLES FOR PEOPLE FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE.

IT'S ALL AHEAD ON COLORES!

REFLECTING PLACE.

WELCOME TO COLORES!

I'M HERE WITH NANI CHACON, ARTIST AND MURALIST.

HOW ARE YOU TODAY?

I'M GOOD!

THANK YOU.

CAN YOU TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THAT PAINTING

RIGHT NEXT TO YOU?

THIS PAINTING I DID THIS PAST YEAR IT'S CALLED

IT'S FINISHED IN BEAUTY.

FOR ME IT'S MORE ABOUT THIS FEELING OF KIND OF

BOUNDARIES AND RESISTANCE THROUGH THOSE BOUNDARIES

AND KIND OF THE PERSEVERANCE TO CONTINUE

ON A PATH DESPITE OBSTACLES THAT MAY BE IN YOUR WAY.

WHEN YOU'RE ON THE RIGHT PATH AND WHEN YOU'RE DOING

THINGS FOR THE RIGHT REASONS THAT WHATEVER

THOSE OBSTACLES BE KIND OF START TO DIMINISH AND OF

COURSE THIS IS SOMETHING I'VE SEEN LIKE TIME AND

TIME AGAIN SO FOR ME IT'S JUST POETRY AND

OBSERVATION REALLY.

LET'S TALK ABOUT YOUR BEAUTIFUL MURAL ¡RESISTE!

YEAH! YOU KNOW SOME PEOPLE SAY THAT IF YOU WANNA KNOW A

CITY YOU HAVE TO LOOK AT THE CITY'S WALLS.

AND WHAT STORY ARE THE FIGURES IN THAT MURAL TELLING?

IT, FOR ME IT WAS THIS IDEA OF OF UNITED

RESISTANCE ACROSS THE AMERICAS.

I THINK THAT THERE'S SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES THAT

GOVERNMENTS, EVEN MEDIA WANT TO DIVIDE US WE HAVE

PHYSICAL BORDERS THAT DIVIDE US,

WE HAVE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES THAT DIVIDE US, WE HAVE ALL OF

THESE IMPLICATIONS THAT REALLY TRY TO DIVIDE US IN

SO MANY DIFFERENT WAYS, STIGMAS, LANGUAGE,

ALL OF THESE YOU KNOW.

BUT REALLY INDIGENOUS PEOPLE HAVE MIGRATED FOR

HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS IF NOT THOUSANDS OF YEARS AND RIGHT NOW

WE ARE ACROSS THE AMERICAS FIGHTING FOR THE SAME THINGS.

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR UM, FOR OUR ENVIRONMENT, FOR OUR

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, ECONOMIC

JUSTICE, HEALTH CARE, ALL OF THESE THINGS THAT THAT

UNITES US IN SO MANY DIFFERENT WAYS.

WHAT WERE SOME REACTIONS YOU GOT THAT YOU WEREN'T EXPECTING?

ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I DID NOT EXPECT FOR THAT

PIECE TO SPEAK TO WAS THE JUSTIFICATION THAT IS

CURRENTLY HAPPENING IN BOYLE HEIGHTS WHICH IS

WHERE THE PIECE IS LOCATED AND THAT I FOUND

REFRESHING BECAUSE IT IT REALLY TALKED ABOUT

RESISTANCE IN ALL FORMS UM RESISTING.

RESISTING KIND OF ALL THOSE ACTS OF OPPRESSIVE

COLONIZATION EVEN EVEN TILL NOW.

DO YOU THINK THE MEANING OF YOUR MURAL WOULD CHANGE

IF YOU MOVED IT TO A DIFFERENT PLACE?

IF WE TOOK IT FROM BOYLE HEIGHTS AND

SAY PUT IT ON CENTRAL AVENUE.

I THINK MAYBE THE THE CHANGE IS IF WE PUT IT SOMEWHERE LIKE

UM KENTUCKY OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT YOU KNOW UMM.

OR SOMEWHERE THAT YOU KNOW OR IN THE SUBURBS OF YOU

KNOW SOMEWHERE THAT WOULD HAVE NO CONTEXT OR MEANING

TO THAT, OF COURSE IT WOULD CHANGE BECAUSE UMM

AND IT MIGHT EVEN BE MET WITH HOSTILITY INSTEAD OF

EMBRACED, IT MIGHT BE MET WITH SOME KIND OF UM

ADVERSITY UMM AND, AND WHICH IS WHAT I THINK WE

SEE ACROSS THE BOARD RIGHT NOW WHEN WE'RE LOOKING AT

MONUMENTS AND WHEN WE LOOK AT STORIES AND HOW HOW

THESE AFFECT DIFFERENT STORIES AND WHICH IS THE

MAIN REASON WHY I MAKE MY WORK SITE SPECIFIC IS I,

I'M ACUTE TO THOSE CHANGES AND I'M ACUTE TO THAT DIALOGUE.

ONE OF THE MOST REFRESHING AND BEAUTIFUL THINGS ABOUT

MY PROCESS AND ABOUT WHAT I DO IS THAT I'M ENGAGED

IN A COMMUNITY IT'S NOT JUST YOU KNOW OH I HAVE

THIS IDEA I'M GONNA GO STICK IT ON A WALL AND YOU

KNOW, YOU KNOW YOU GUYS DEAL WITH IT.

IT IT REALLY, I REALLY LIKE WHEN THERE'S THAT

EXCHANGE AND THAT NOT ONLY HAVE I BEEN ABLE TO ADD

SOMETHING THERE BUT THAT SOMETHING WAS ADDED ALSO

FROM THE COMMUNITY IN EXCHANGE.

WHY DO YOU FEEL THAT IT'S IMPORTANT TO DO THESE

COMMUNITY-BASED PROJECTS THAT YOU DO?

UHH MY MAIN REASON IS ACCESSIBILITY.

I PUT MY BODY INTO THIS PHYSICALLY EVERY SINGLE

TIME, I PUT MY TIME, I PUT MY SOUL, I PUT MY

THOUGHTS, I PUT THE CUMULATION OF MY LIVELIHOOD.

I REALLY PUT EVERYTHING THAT I AM INTO THIS.

I PUT THE CUMULATIONS OF CONVERSATIONS AND THE

INTERACTIONS I'VE HAD WITH PEOPLE NOT ONLY IN THIS TIME

BUT THROUGHOUT MY LIFETIME INTO EVERY SINGLE PIECE OF WORK AND

I DON'T FEEL MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES ARE INCLUSIVE SPACES.

I THINK THAT THEY SPEAK TO AN ELITIST WORLD AND IF

I'M GONNA PUT AND SPEND MY TIME ON THIS WORLD PUTTING

WORK OUT THERE, PUTTING WORK THAT HAS SO MUCH OF

MY BEING, MY EXPERIENCE, MY LIFE, MY LIVELIHOOD,

THE ACCUMULATION OF NOT ONLY MY LIVELIHOOD BUT YOU

KNOW MY ANCESTORS ALSO THEN I WANT AS MUCH PEOPLE

AS ABSOLUTELY CAN TO BE ABLE TO SEE THAT, TO

EXPERIENCE THAT, AND BE ABLE TO ENGAGE WITH IT.

AND THEN THE OTHER SIDE OF THAT IS I FEEL THAT THERE'S AN

IMPORTANCE TO RECLAIM SPACE AS AN INDIGENOUS WOMAN.

I THINK THAT OUR- OUR ENVIRONMENTS ARE ARE

INSTINCTIVELY COLONIZED EVEN IN DESIGN BY URBAN

URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE AND FOR ME

IT'S IMPORTANT TO RECLAIM THAT SPACE ANY WAY THAT I KNOW HOW.

LEARNING HISTORY.

>>ED: I'M DOING THE MAYOR AND I'M DOING A BIG

PROJECT FOR THE CITY OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

>>TAMARA: WITH LIMITLESS ENERGY, ASTRONAUT

TURNED INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED SCULPTOR, ED DWIGHT,

METICULOUSLY SHAPES MASSES OF CLAY INTO SOME OF THE

MOST SPECTACULAR ARTWORK IN THE WORLD WITH

A SENSE OF HUMOR TO MATCH.

[LAUGHTER]

TODAY, DWIGHT SELLS MORE PIECES AROUND THE WORLD THAN IN THE US.

AUSTRALIA, JAPAN, THE UK, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND,

NORWAY JUST TO NAME A FEW.

ED STARTED OUT AS AN ARTIST.

ACTUALLY WAS HIS FIRST LOVE.

AS A YOUNG CHILD OF ABOUT 9 OR 10 YEARS OLD,

HE WOULD HELP HIS GRANDFATHER COLLECT SCRAP METAL AND

THEN TURN IT INTO SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL.

AT THE AGE OF TWO, HIS MOTHER PUT HIM IN ART CLASSES.

I WAS DOING ART FOR, WE HAD A FAMILY RESTAURANT

AND I DID ALL THE ART FOR THE RESTAURANT, AND THE

MENUS AND DESIGNED ALL THAT KIND OF STUFF WHEN I

WAS 12, 13, 14 YEARS OLD.

>>TAMARA: BUT HE HAD HIS EYES SET ON THE SKIES EVEN BACK THEN.

OUR FARM BUTTED UP AGAINST FAIRFAX AIRPORT, AND I HAD

BEEN GOING TO THE AIRPORT EVERYDAY SINCE I COULD WALK.

>>TAMARA: AS HE GOT OLDER, HUNTERS HIRED HIM

TO CLEAN THE PLANES AFTER A HUNTING TRIP.

>>BY THE TIME I WAS A LITTLE OLDER, I SAID, "I

DON'T WANNA CLEAN THESE AIRPLANES, I WANNA FLY."

>>TAMARA: BY THE TIME HE WAS 9 OR 10, HE TOOK TO THE SKIES,

SORT OF.

>>I STARTED BUILDING AIRPLANES OUT OF ORANGE CRATES.

I BUILT A NEIGHBORHOOD AIRPLANE OUT OF SAFEWAY ORANGE CRATES.

AND I WOULD TAKE ALL THE NEIGHBORHOOD KIDS

FLYING IN MY PLANE.

I MADE PLANE NOISES AND "WE'RE OVER PARIS NOW."

I SWEAR TO GOD, AND PEOPLE THOUGHT I WAS CRAZY.

>>TAMARA: CRAZY OR NOT, THAT DREAM BECAME A REALITY.

HE JOINED THE AIR FORCE IN 1953.

DWIGHT WAS WORKING ON HIS MASTER'S WHEN ONE DAY,

HE RECEIVED A LETTER OUT OF THE BLUE,

AT THE DIRECTION OF PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY

FROM THE PENTAGON, ASKING IF HE'D LIKE TO BE AN ASTRONAUT.

>>I'M THINKING ABOUT, "I COULD END UP BEING THE

GREATEST NEGRO THAT EVER LIVED."

>>TAMARA: "THE GREATEST NEGRO THAT HAS EVER LIVED."

IS THAT WHAT THEY SAID?

>> YEAH.

MY ANSWER WAS, "EVEN JACKIE ROBINSON?"

>>TAMARA: BUT HIS COMMANDER TOLD HIM,

"THEY'RE NOT READY FOR YOU." IN OTHER WORDS, "YOU'RE BLACK."

>> "WELL, IF I DO THIS, I COULD GET

ON THE COVER OF EBONY MAGAZINE." AND THE GUY

LOOKED AT ME AND HE SAID, "WHAT THE HELL IS EBONY MAGAZINE?

"WHAT DOES THAT MEAN, WHAT DOES IT MEAN?"

>>TAMARA: HE PUT IN HIS APPLICATION ANYWAY.

THREE DAYS LATER, HE GOT A RESPONSE, AND SOON, DWIGHT

WAS ON HIS WAY TO BECOME A TEST PILOT, AND THE FIRST

AFRICAN-AMERICAN IN SPACE.

>>NEWS ANCHOR: A 29-YEAR-OLD NEGRO SAYS HE

IS ANXIOUS TO GO INTO SPACE.

HE'S CAPTAIN EDWARD DWIGHT OF THE AIR FORCE, SELECTED

TO BE AN ASTRONAUT, THE FIRST OF HIS RACE TO BE SO DESIGNATED.

>>TAMARA: BUT THEN, ONE OF THE UGLIEST MOMENTS IN

OUR NATION'S HISTORY CHANGED THE LIVES OF EVERY

AMERICAN, INCLUDING ED DWIGHT.

>> YEAH, WHEN THE PRESIDENT DIED, KENNEDY

WAS DEAD, NOW PRESIDENT JOHNSON GOTTA MAKE A DECISION.

>>TAMARA: DWIGHT SAYS THE GOVERNMENT TRIED TO PAINT

HIM AS A NATIONAL THREAT.

>> AND A DOSSIER HAD ME TRYING TO KILL THE PRESIDENT.

I WAS IN ARIZONA...

I MEAN WAS IN NEW MEXICO, IN ALBUQUERQUE STANDING ON

A PARK BENCH IN DOWNTOWN ALBUQUERQUE IN MY UNIFORM

FIRING A 45-CALIBER PISTOL IN THE AIR SAYING,

"I'M GONNA KILL PRESIDENT JOHNSON."

AND I WAS SHOOTING IN THE AIR, AND THE WAY THE THING READ,

THAT THE LOCAL COPS HAD CIRCLED THE THING.

THEY DIDN'T GET OUT OF THEIR CARS, THEY CIRCLED

THE PARK, ALL THESE POLICE CARS WHILE THEY CALLED THE

MILITARY AT KIRTLAND AIR BASE.

THAT'S WHEN THE MILITARY CAME OUT AND PURPORTEDLY

ARRESTED ME, TOOK THE GUN AWAY FROM ME, PUT ME IN

THE STRAIGHT JACKET, AND I WAS IN THIS STRAIGHT

JACKET FOR 30 DAYS AT KIRTLAND HOSPITAL, OKAY?

I BEEN TO KIRTLAND ONE TIME IN MY LIFE AND THAT

WAS TO GET SOME GAS IN MY JET.

>>TAMARA: STORY AFTER STORY.

THAT'S WHY AFTER 16 YEARS, HE DECIDED TO LEAVE THE

AIR FORCE AND MOVE TO DENVER.

EVENTUALLY, HE LANDED A JOB WITH IBM, AND SOON

CREATED THE ART FOR THEIR OFFICES.

HE LEFT IBM AND STARTED A NUMBER OF COMPANIES,

INCLUDING AN AVIATION COMPANY, CONSTRUCTION COMPANY,

AND A CHAIN OF RESTAURANTS CALLED, THE RIB CAGE.

>> I HAD RESTAURANTS ALL OVER TOWN, GIRL.

>>TAMARA: IT WASN'T UNTIL LATER IN LIFE THAT DWIGHT

LEARNED ABOUT THE RICH, AND OFTEN BRUTAL,

AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE US.

>>ED: I GOT REALLY, REALLY, REALLY UPSET,

'CAUSE ALL THE STUFF HAD GONE ON WHILE I WAS LIVING.

EVEN ALL THE LYNCHINGS AND ALL THAT STUFF, AND I READ

THAT AND I GOT REALLY ANGRY.

>>TAMARA: DWIGHT WAS SO ANGRY AND INSPIRED TO TELL

THE STORIES ABOUT AFRICAN-AMERICANS THROUGH

HIS ART THAT HE SOLD ALL OF HIS BUSINESSES AND WENT

BACK TO SCHOOL AT THE AGE OF 42, AND GOT A MASTER'S.

>>ED: BECAUSE OF MY WORLD EXPERIENCE, THEY PUT ME IN

CHARGE OF THE SCULPTURE DEPARTMENT,

THE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER.

I RAN THE SCULPTURE DEPARTMENT THERE FOR THREE YEARS.

>>TAMARA: I ASKED HIM IF HE EVERY LOOKS BACK ON HIS

CAREER AS A TEST PILOT HAVING COME SO CLOSE TO

BECOMING THE FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN IN SPACE.

AND WONDER HOW HE GOT HERE TO BECOME ONE OF THE MOST

SOUGHT AFTER SCULPTORS IN THE WORLD.

>> HAD I NOT DONE THAT, I WOULDN'T HAVE HAD THE...

I'LL USE A GOOD WORD, FORTITUDE TO DO ANYTHING

APPROACHING THIS.

>> TAMARA: THIS EXTRAORDINARY ART.

AS A YOUNG MAN, DWIGHT HADN'T STUDIED

HARRIET TUBMAN OR FREDERICK DOUGLASS.

>>ED: IF THERE WAS ANY DISCRIMINATION, I THOUGHT

IT WAS 'CAUSE I WAS SHORT AND NOT 'CAUSE I WAS BLACK.

SO IT WASN'T TILL LATER WHEN I REALLY SAW THE

DEPTH OF IT AND HOW DASTARD IT WAS WHEN I

STARTED READING ALL THIS BLACK HISTORY.

I SAID, "OH MY GOD, "SOMETHING HAPPENED BEFORE I WAS BORN."

>>[TAMARA] THAT'S WHY SO MUCH OF DWIGHT'S

ARTWORK TODAY DEPICTS AFRICAN-AMERICANS

AND AFRICANS, AND THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE WORLD.

ENGINEERING, ARTISTRY AND THE ROLE OF WOMEN.

"DRIVERS, START YOUR ENGINES!"

THIS IS A SHOWCASE OF SPEED.

A HISTORY OF HORSEPOWER AND ENGINEERING FROM THE

LARGEST SINGLE-DAY SPORTING EVENT IN THE WORLD.

THE INDIANAPOLIS 500.

"I THINK THAT MOST PEOPLE THINK 'OH, I DON'T CARE

ABOUT AUTO RACING, IT DOESN'T IMPACT ME AT ALL.'

BUT ACTUALLY ANYONE WHO OWNS A PASSENGER CAR IS

IMPACTED BY CAR RACING EVERY DAY."

THE CARS IN THIS RACING RETROSPECTIVE AT THE

HERITAGE MUSEUMS AND GARDENS ARE FUELED BY DESIGN,

EACH ONE A TESTAMENT TO THE PURSUIT OF AUTOMOTIVE INGENUITY.

FROM THE NARROW CHASSIS OF EARLY AMERICAN ROADSTERS

TO THE THICK TIRES, WILD WINGS, AND SWOOPING GROUND

EFFECTS OF TODAY'S INDY CARS.

EACH REPRESENTS A LANDMARK IN ENGINEERING.

EVEN THE ONES THAT WEREN'T BUILT FOR SPEED.

"THIS IS THE PACE CAR USED FOR THE ORIGINAL 1911,

FIRST 1911 RACE.

FORTY CARS QUALIFIED FOR THE RACE THAT YEAR, WHICH

WAS MORE THAN THE FOUNDERS WERE REALLY EXPECTING WOULD,

AND THEY FELT IT WAS TOO MANY FOR A STANDING START.

JENNIFER MADDEN IS THE MUSEUM'S DIRECTOR OF

COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS.

EVERY CAR HERE REPRESENTS A MOMENT IN HISTORY AT THE

INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY, A TRACK WHICH

EVOLVED FROM A DIRT OVAL INTO THE LARGEST SPEEDWAY

IN THE UNITED STATES.

IT ALL BEGAN WITH CARL FISHER, AN ENTERPRISING

BUSINESSMAN AND MOTORSPORT ENTHUSIAST IN THE U.S.

CAR CAPITOL OF INDIANAPOLIS.

HE VISITED EUROPE, HE SAW EUROPEAN AUTO RACING.

THEIR ROADS WERE IN MUCH BETTER SHAPE THAN OURS,

AND HE REALIZED THAT AMERICAN MANUFACTURERS

WERE NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO COMPETE UNLESS THEY HAD

A PURPOSE-BUILT SPEEDWAY FOR THEM TO TEST THEIR CARS."

WHAT BEGAN AS A SHOWCASE OF EVERYDAY CARS QUICKLY

EVOLVED INTO A SPECTACLE OF SPEED.

FANS CAME FROM NEAR AND FAR TO WITNESS THE WORLD'S BEST DRIVERS

RACE 500 MILES IN THE MOST ADVANCED AUTOMOBILES OF THE DAY.

"IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE RACE YOU WILL SEE

STREAMLINED BODIES ON THE CARS, AND TRYING TO

ELIMINATE ANY SOURCES OF DRAG.

MOST OF THE EARLY CARS HAVE SPACE FOR TWO PEOPLE,

BECAUSE THERE WAS A RIDING MECHANIC THAT WAS REQUIRED

TO BE WITH THE DRIVER IN THE CAR."

AT THE HEART OF THIS EXHIBITION IS THE

EVOLUTION OF AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN.

FROM THIS 1913 DUESENBERG TO MARIO ANDRETTI'S

EXPERIMENTAL 1972 PARNELLI TO THE JET-LIKE 2005 HONDA

OF RACING SUPERSTAR DANICA PATRICK.

"I THINK OF RACE CARS BEING VERY UTILITARIAN,

THEIR POINT IS TO GO FAST, THEY DON'T HAVE TO LOOK PRETTY.

BUT ACTUALLY WHEN YOU GO AROUND AND LOOK AT THE

CARS YOU CAN SEE WHATEVER THE CONTEMPORARY DESIGN AESTHETIC

OF THE DAY IS MAKING ITS WAY INTO THE CARS THEMSELVES."

"(NOW I KNOW THAT THIS IS YOUR FAVORITE, I SUSPECT

THIS WOULD BE THE FAVORITE OF A LOT OF PEOPLE,

TELL ME ABOUT THIS CAR.)

THIS IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF A RACECAR. 1935 MILLER FORD.

FIRST OF ALL, THE DESIGN OF IT IS SO ART DECO, YOU

CAN GET THAT EVIDENCE SO WELL FROM THE SHAPE OF THE

CAR ITSELF, HOW IT ENDS IN THE BOAT TAIL UP THERE.

THEY WERE WORKING ON AERODYNAMIC FEATURES FOR

THE CAR AS WELL, SO YOU SEE THESE CAST ALUMINUM COVERED

SUSPENSION PIECES, THAT WAS UNUSUAL FOR THIS CAR AS WELL.

AND THE PAINT, OF COURSE, SCREAMS ART DECO."

""IN THE BEGINNING THEY WERE VERY RUGGED,

LYN ST. JAMES IS AN INDY MATRIARCH.

SHE SPENT DECADES IMMERSED IN MOTORSPORT AS A DRIVER,

THEN LATER AS A MENTOR.

SOMETHING SHE NEVER THOUGHT POSSIBLE GROWING

UP IN THE 1960S.

"I HAVE TO SAY THAT I'LL NEVER FORGET THAT

EXPERIENCE OF GOING TO THE INDY 500.

BUT AT THE SAME TIME, I NEVER SAID 'OH WELL I'M

GOING TO DO THAT.' I MEAN, WOMEN WEREN'T EVEN ALLOWED

IN GASOLINE ALLEY YOU KNOW, IT WAS A.

IT WAS A DIFFERENT TIME IN SOCIETY."

SHE PERSISTED.

LYN WAS 26 WHEN SHE BEGAN HER RACING CAREER IN 1973.

BUT IT WAS ALMOST ANOTHER 20 YEARS BEFORE HER FIRST

INDY 500 RACE, WHEN SHE BECAME THE FIRST EVER

WOMAN TO WIN ROOKIE OF THE YEAR.

"I JUST FIGURED THAT'S NOT EVEN IN THE CARDS.

BUT BOY, WHEN I GOT UP AT THAT VICTORY BANQUET AND

ALL OF A SUDDEN, I MEAN I HAD A STANDING OVATION, AND.

IT WAS LIKE, 'YES!

I DID THIS!' "

INSPIRED BY GENDER-DEFYING ATHLETES

LIKE BILLIE JEAN KING, LYN BECAME AN ADVOCATE FOR

WOMEN IN MOTORSPORT, ADVISING YOUNG FEMALE

DRIVERS LIKE SARAH FISCHER AND DANICA PATRICK.

"I GOT SO MUCH FAN MAIL FROM YOUNG GIRLS AND

WOMEN, UM, WANTING ADVICE!

AND I WAS LIKE 'YOU KNOW I HAVE TO, I HAVE TO DO SOMETHING!'

[LAUGHS]

"AS A FAN AND COMPETITOR, SHE'S SEEN THE

IMPACT OF THE INDY 500 WORLDWIDE.

"I DON'T THINK OF ANY OTHER COMMUNITY THAT'S HAD

THAT KIND OF A HISTORY FOR ONE EVENT, ONCE A YEAR

THAT HAS PUT IT ON THE MAP AROUND THE ENTIRE WORLD.

IF YOU TRAVEL AROUND THE WORLD AND YOU SAY YOU'RE

FROM INDIANA, PEOPLE GO, 'IS THAT THE INDIANAPOLIS 500?'

EVEN IF THEY'VE NEVER BEEN TO A RACE AND THEY AREN'T

A RACE FAN."

A LEGACY OF RACING, MEMORIALIZED IN THE CARS

THAT MADE THEIR MARK -- 500 MILES AT A TIME.

CHALLENGING EXPECTATIONS.

>>JOE: WELL, AT MARJORIE BOOK OUR GOAL IS

TO BRING MORE PEOPLE WITH AND WITHOUT DISABILITIES TOGETHER.

AND WE FIND THAT THEATRE PUSHES PEOPLE TO BE MORE

TOLERANT OF OTHER VIEWPOINTS AND OTHER WALKS OF LIFE.

THEATRE GIVES PEOPLE AN OPPORTUNITY TO COME

OUTSIDE OF THEMSELVES, AND TO TRY TO TAKE ON THE

PERSPECTIVES AND ATTITUDES OF OTHER PEOPLE.

MARJORIE BOOK STARTED SOMEWHAT BY

ACCIDENT, IN THAT THERE WAS A GROUP OF HIGH SCHOOL

AND COLLEGE STUDENTS THAT DECIDED TO PRODUCE A PLAY.

AND WE HAPPENED TO INCLUDE SOMEONE WITH A DISABILITY

IN THE CAST, WHO WAS A FRIEND OF MINE.

WE DIDN'T GIVE IT A LOT OF THOUGHT AT THE TIME, BUT

HE WAS VISUALLY IMPAIRED.

NATURALLY, IN THE COURSE OF THAT PLAY PRODUCTION,

WE HAD TO THINK ABOUT HOW TO MAKE THINGS MORE

ACCESSIBLE FOR HIM.

MANY OF THE PEOPLE IN OUR GROUP HAVE BEEN INVOLVED

IN A PLAY BEFORE, BUT MARJORIE BOOK TENDS TO PUT ON

MORE DIFFICULT PLAYS, PLAYS THAT ARE PART OF THE THEATRE CANON.

IT'S CHALLENGING, SO I THINK IT'S A GOOD

OPPORTUNITY FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES TO MAYBE

TAKE A MEDIUM SIZE ROLE, OR EVEN A LARGE ROLE IN A

MORE CHALLENGING PLAY.

AND FOR PEOPLE WITHOUT DISABILITIES, THEY ALSO

MAY HAVE PREVIOUS THEATRE EXPERIENCE, BUT THIS GIVES

THEM AN OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY WORK AS A TEAM, TO

TRY TO BRING THE WHOLE GROUP UP TO THE POINT

WHERE EVERYONE'S WORKING TOGETHER,

EVERYONE'S GOTTEN THE KIND OF ACCOMMODATIONS THEY NEED,

SO THAT THE PLAY ITSELF CAN BE SOMETHING EVERYONE

CAN BE PROUD OF.

>>JAMES: I WAS THE LEAD, AND I LOVED HOW WHEN JOE

TEACHES TO FOCUS ON ACTING AND BEING WITH YOUR FRIENDS.

MY GOAL IS TO MAKE SURE THAT WE PUT ON A GOOD

PRODUCT FOR THE AUDIENCE, BECAUSE THAT'S WHAT IT'S

ABOUT, DOING A GOOD PERFORMANCE FOR THE AUDIENCE.

>>JACK: WE WORK ON ACTORS ONE-ON-ONE, READING THROUGH

THEIR LINES AND HELPING THEM TO PRONOUNCE DIFFICULT WORDS.

ALSO, I THINK WHAT I BRING TO IT WITH THE THEATRE

BACKGROUND IS I CAN TALK TO THE ACTORS ABOUT THEIR

INTENTION IN WHAT THEY'RE SAYING, WHY THEY'RE SAYING

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING, AND EXPLAIN TO THEM HOW THAT

MAKES IT SEEM MORE REAL FOR THE AUDIENCE.

>>JOE: FOR THE MANY HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE

STUDENTS WITHOUT DISABILITIES, THAT HAVE

BEEN INVOLVED IN MARJORIE BOOK, THEY HAVE OFTEN SAID

TO ME, AFTER THEY'VE BEEN INVOLVED FOR A MONTH OR

MORE, THAT THEY DIDN'T REALIZE THAT INDIVIDUALS

WITH VARIOUS COGNITIVE DISABILITIES OR DEVELOPMENTAL

DISABILITIES COULD ENGAGE IN A PLAY AT THIS LEVEL.

IT'S CERTAINLY BEEN A LEARNING EXPERIENCE FOR

THEM, IN LEARNING WHAT PEOPLE CAN DO.

>>ACTOR: "WHY ARE YOU AFRAID OF SAYING THE RIGHT WORDS?

WHY ARE YOU ASHAMED THAT YOU LOVE JULIE?"

>>ACTRESS: "I AIN'T ASHAMED OF ANYTHING."

>>JOE: EVERY YEAR WE TRY TO PRODUCE THREE SHOWS,

AND OUR THIRD SHOW OF THE YEAR IS USUALLY A MUSICAL.

WE ARE CURRENTLY DOING CAROUSEL BY RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN.

WE HAVE THE CHALLENGE THAT WE NEED TO BE WORKING

SCENES WITH SMALL AND LARGE GROUPS OF ACTORS.

BUT IN OUR GROUP, WE DO HAVE A NUMBER OF ACTORS

WHO NEED SOME ONE-ON-ONE WORK WITH A COACH OR A TUTOR,

IF YOU WILL.

SOMETIMES IT'S JUST A FELLOW ACTOR IN THE PLAY.

AND SO BOTH OF THOSE THINGS GO ON AND OUR

REHEARSALS ARE USUALLY WORKING A PARTICULAR SCENE

IN THE PLAY, AND THEN DURING THE MUSICAL,

WE HAVE THE ADDED COMPLICATION THAT WE HAVE

A MUSIC ACCOMPANIST, AND WE HAVE A MUSIC DIRECTOR

THAT ARE MEETING WITH SMALL OR LARGE GROUPS OF

ACTORS AT THE SAME TIME, PREPARING SONGS FOR OUR SHOWS.

OUR AUDIENCE PROBABLY ARRIVES WITH THE QUESTION

OF, "IS THIS GROUP GOING TO BE ABLE TO PRODUCE A PLAY?

WILL IT HAPPEN?

WILL THEY BE ABLE TO PULL IT OFF?"

AND FORTUNATELY, THE ANSWER 95% OF THE TIME IN

THE PAST HAS BEEN YES, WE'VE BEEN ABLE TO PULL IT OFF.

SO I THINK THAT EXCITES THE AUDIENCE, WATCHING THE

VARIOUS PIECES OF THE PLAY COME TOGETHER.

OUR AUDIENCE KNOWS TYPICALLY ABOUT THE

INCLUSIVE NATURE OF OUR GROUP, THAT WE HAVE ACTORS

WITH AND WITHOUT DISABILITIES.

THEY'RE EXCITED TO SEE THE WORK THAT WE'VE DONE PAY OFF.

WE HOPE THAT MARJORIE BOOK WILL REACH MANY PEOPLE IN

GREATER CINCINNATI, AND HELP THEM TO SEE PEOPLE

WITH DISABILITIES CONTRIBUTING IN A

DIFFERENT WAY THAN THEY THOUGHT.

TO SEE THAT PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES CAN GIVE BACK

TO OTHERS, AND ALSO TO SEE THAT THERE'S YET ANOTHER

WAY OR WAYS THAT PEOPLE WITHOUT DISABILITIES CAN

CONNECT WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES THROUGH

COMMON INTERESTS, THROUGH SHARED LOVES, AND IN THIS

CASE TODAY, WE'RE TALKING ABOUT THEATRE.

AND SO I THINK SOME OF OUR CAST MEMBERS AND AUDIENCE

MEMBERS, WE HOPE THAT THEY WILL COME AWAY FEELING

LIKE, "WOW, I JUST REALLY CONNECTED WITH SOMEONE

THAT WAS DIFFERENT FROM ME, OVER THEATRE.

WE BOTH LOVE THEATRE, SO WE HAVE THAT CONNECTION

THAT MIGHT LEAD TO AN ONGOING FRIENDSHIP IN THE FUTURE."

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"UNTIL NEXT WEEK, THANK YOU FOR WATCHING."

FUNDING FOR COLORES WAS PROVIDED IN PART BY:

FREDERICK HAMMERSLEY FOUNDATION

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