Colores

FULL EPISODE

Dreams Unreal

Andrew Connors, director of the Albuquerque Museum, shares insight into “Dreams Unreal,” an exploration into the fantastical psychedelic rock posters from the late 1960s.

AIRED: July 18, 2020 | 0:27:15
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

FREDERICK HAMMERSLEY FOUNDATION...

...AND VIEWERS LIKE YOU

DIRECTOR OF THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM, ANDREW

CONNORS, TAKES US ON A PSYCHEDELIC TRIP THROUGH

EPIC ROCK POSTERS OF THE 1960'S.

JAMES ALEXANDER INSTILLS COURAGE AND SELF ESTEEM

THROUGH HIP-HOP DANCE.

SIGN PAINTER DEREK MCDONALD FOCUSES ON

VINTAGE DESIGN AND TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUES TO

PAINT HIS SIGNS.

WOODWORKER GREG VIGIL IS INSPIRED BY NATURAL WOOD

GRAIN AND IMPERFECTIONS.

GLASSBLOWER NATE FREELAND DANCES WITH MOLTEN GLASS

AND ANCIENT TECHNIQUES.

IT'S ALL AHEAD ON COLORES!

A PSYCHIDELIC ROCK EXPLOSION.

>>WELCOME TO COLORES, WE ARE HERE TODAY WITH ANDREW

CONNORS, THE DIRECTOR OF THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM.

>>HELLO ANDREW.

>>HELLO DEVON!

>>IT'S GOOD TO SEE YOU.

>HOW ARE YOU TODAY?

>>GOOD TO SEE YOU!

>>TERRIFIC.

>>SO, WE'RE HERE AT THE DREAMS UNREAL EXHIBITION.

CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WHAT INSPIRED

THIS EXHIBITION?

>>THE DREAMS UNREAL EXHIBITION IS UH PUT

TOGETHER ALMOST ENTIRELY OUT OF POSTERS THAT WERE

DONATED TO THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM BY JIM GUNN, A MAN

WHO WENT TO THE BAY AREA IN 1967 TO STUDY MEDICINE.

SO, HE BECAME A DOCTOR IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LATE

60'S BAY AREA PSYCHEDELIC ROCK EXPLOSION.

AND HE WANTED TO PRESERVE THIS INCREDIBLE COLLECTION

THAT HE DEVELOPED SO HE GAVE ABOUT 300 OF THESE

OBJECTS TO THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM A COUPLE OF YEARS

AGO AND WE WANTED TO CELEBRATE THEM AND TELL

THE STORY OF THE 1960'S AND THIS INCREDIBLE

DYNAMIC CREATIVE MOMENT IN AMERICAN HISTORY AS

ILLUSTRATED THROUGH THESE GREAT POSTERS.

>>WHAT IS IT ABOUT THEM THAT'S SPECIAL?

>>WELL ONE OF MY FAVORITES IN IN THE EXHIBITION IS

ACTUALLY THE ONE THAT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

PRESS LOVES SO MUCH THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE IT ON

THE COVER OF THE BEAUTIFUL BOOK CALLED: DREAMS UNREAL

THE GENESIS OF THE PSYCHEDELIC ROCK POSTER.

AND SO, THIS IS A POSTER BY BOB SCHNEPF.

AND BOB SCHNEPF UH WAS A INCREDIBLY UH WELL

EDUCATED GRAPHIC ARTIST.

AS IN ARTIST IN HIS OWN RIGHT.

HE SERVED IN THE NAVY STARTING AT AGE 17 AND GOT

OUT OF THE NAVY WHEN HE WAS 24 AND UH WENT TO ART

SCHOOL AND MADE SOME OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE

POSTERS THAT HAVE ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO

UH WITH THE MUSICIANS THEMSELVES.

THIS POSTER BEHIND ME IS THE ONE I REALLY WANT TO

TALK ABOUT.

I WAS RAISED IN COLORADO, IN SUBURBAN DENVER BASICALLY.

SO THE FACT THAT THIS IS PROMOTING A SEPTEMBER 1967

CONCERT IN DENVER MAKES ME REALLY HAPPY.

>>WHAT IS IT ABOUT THEM THAT INSPIRES YOU?

>>WELL AS AS AN ART HISTORIAN I LOVE THE FACT

THAT THERE'S SO MUCH ASSIMILATION OF OTHER STUFF.

MOST OF THE TIME THE TEXT, WHICH IS WHAT IS, A POSTER

IS SUPPOSED TO BE ABOUT.

IT'S SUPPOSED TO TELL YOU.

ABOUT SOMETHING.

ABOUT AN EVENT.

BUT MOST OF THE TEXT IS REALLY DENSE AND HARD TO

READ, YOU REALLY HAVE TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME WITH IT.

AND THEN THEY ASSIMILATED ALL OF THESE OTHER IMAGES,

THE CENTRAL IMAGE ADVERTISING THIS CONCERT

IN DENVER UH COMES FROM GUSTAVE DORÉ'S ILLUSTRATED BIBLE.

THIS IS JUST A PHOTOCOPY OF THE GUSTAVE DORÉ UH

ILLUSTRATION OF A UH STORY FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT.

WHERE A MAN COMES HOME AND UH PROMISES GOD THAT HE'LL

SACRIFICE THE FIRST THING THAT HE SEES.

WELL HIS DAUGHTER COMES RUNNING OUT WITH ALL OF HER FRIENDS.

AND SO HE HAS TO SACRIFICE HIS DAUGHTER.

WHY THE HECK WOULD THAT BE AN APPROPRIATE IMAGE FOR A

ROCK CONCERT IN 1967!

BUT IT WORKS SO BEAUTIFULLY BECAUSE IT

SEEMS TO BE ABOUT CELEBRATION AND JOY AND HAPPINESS.

THE DAUGHTER WAS HAPPY, THE DAD HAD TO KILL HER.

SHE WASN'T HAPPY BECAUSE HE HAD TO KILL HER.

THERE, SO MANY OF THESE INTERESTING USES OF VERY

MUCH OUT OF FAVOR ART HISTORY THAT THESE YOUNG

GRAPHIC ARTISTS DECIDED TO APPROPRIATE.

THEY PULLED IN ALL OF THESE IMAGES.

SO THE MORE WE LOOK THE MORE WE CAN LEARN.

AND ALSO HIDDEN, UM, IN THE LOWER PART OF THE POSTER

VERY MUCH IN THE PATTERNING YOU CAN BARLEY

SEE IT, AND IT'S PRINTED IN GREEN ON RED SO YOUR

EYES DO THIS INCREDIBLE UM.

OPTICAL THING UM.

IT CREDITS THE LIGHTING DESIGNERS FOR THE CONCERT.

AND SO THIS LANTERN WORKS WAS A UH PSYCHEDELIC LIGHT

SHOW COMPANY, UH, THAT WAS WORKING IN DENVER AT THE TIME.

>A LOT OF PEOPLE THINK ABOUT THIS TIME AS A TIME

OF POSSIBILITY, RADICAL CHANGE, LOOKING FORWARD,

HOW DO YOU THINK THIS EXHIBITION SPEAKS TO THAT?

>>WELL IN PARTICULAR THIS POSTER WAS CREATED IN

1967, AND IN 1967 THERE WAS SUCH GREAT POTENTIAL

AND SUCH GREAT OPTIMISM IN THE MINDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE

WHERE THEY WERE GOING TO SAVE THE WORLD AND THE

WORLD WAS GOING TO BE BETTER AND WE WERE GOING

TO LOOK AFTER EACH OTHER AND CARE FOR PEOPLE.

AND A POSTER LIKES THIS REALLY REFLECTS THAT ON

OPTIMISM AND THAT OPPORTUNITY TO SAY "WE ARE

YOUNG, WE ARE ENTHUSIASTIC, AND WE'RE

GOING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE."

AND SO MUCH OF THIS CREATIVITY DURING THIS

TIME PERIOD, THE ROCK MUSICIANS THAT WERE

INVENTING SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW, UH.

THE LIGHT SHOW ARTIST THAT WERE INVENTING USING

TECHNOLOGY THAT WAS BRAND NEW.

BUT USING IN A WAY THAT SERVED PEOPLE AND WELCOMED ALL.

AND THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT FAMILY DOG

PRODUCTIONS REALLY WANTED TO DO WITH EVERYTHING.

EVERYBODY WAS WELCOMED, EVERYBODY SHOULD COME, AND

EVERYBODY WAS IN THIS TOGETHER.

WHAT AN INCREDIBLE MOMENT OF OPTIMISM THAT I THINK A

LOT OF THE ARTIST EXPRESSED IN THESE GREAT WORKS OF ART.

>>EXCELLENT!

WELL THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR TIME AND THANKS FOR

SPEAKING ABOUT THIS AMAZING EXHIBITION.

>>IT'S MY PLEASURE!

THANKS SO MUCH FOR ASKING.

FROM BREAKDANCING, POPPING AND LOCKING TO

COURAGE AND SELF ESTEEM.

>> MUSIC IS NOT MEANT TO BE HEARD, IT IS MEANT TO BE

>> FELT!

>> FELT, RIGHT.

SO, LET'S GO AHEAD AND GET WARMED UP.

I DIDN'T KNOW I WAS GOING TO BE A DANCER GROWING UP.

I WANTED TO BE AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER,

AND THIS ENDED UP BEING WHAT I'M DOING.

SO, IT'S LIKE KILLING TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE.

READY, GO.

SIDE, SIDE, SIDE, SIDE.

MY NAME IS JAMES ALEXANDER.

I'M THE OWNER OF FLAVOR'D FLOW STUDIO.

SO, HERE AT FLAVOR'D FLOW, MY MAIN FOCUS IS TO

INTRODUCE THE DANCE AND PASS IT DOWN CORRECTLY, IN

THE CULTURE OF HIP-HOP.

[CHEERS]

THERE'S A LOT OF STIGMA, NEGATIVE STIGMA, AROUND HIP-HOP

CULTURE AND THE DANCE DUE TO THE MEDIA.

AND THAT'S NOT REALLY WHAT HIP-HOP CULTURE IS ABOUT

OR EVEN THE DANCE.

IN HIP-HOP CULTURE, WE HAVE THREE

MAIN DANCES TO THE CULTURE.

THERE'S BREAKIN', WHICH IS THE ORIGINAL STYLE OF

HIP-HOP CULTURE.

THEN THERE ARE -- THERE WAS POPPING, WHICH IS A WEST COAST.

CAME FROM FRESNO, CALIFORNIA, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA.

AND THEN WE HAVE LOCKING, WHICH CAME FROM

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

ARE YOU READY?

HERE, I TEACH BREAKING AND POPPING.

FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT.

LET'S START DOING A LITTLE TURN.

POPPING IS MORE KNOWN -- A LOT OF PEOPLE BECAUSE OF THE MEDIA.

I'VE CALLED IT 'POPPING AND LOCKING' OR 'POP AND

LOCK,' WHICH IS ACTUALLY TWO DIFFERENT DANCES.

WITH POPPING, IN THE '70S, IT WAS JUST A MUSCLE ISOLATION.

IT WAS JUST A QUICK HIT OF THE MUSCLE.

NOW, A LOT OF PEOPLE LOOK AT IT AS THE ROBOT.

THE WAVES.

THE MUSCLE ISOLATIONS.

DIFFERENT THINGS LIKE THAT.

>> I'VE BEEN DANCING FOR ABOUT --

THIS WILL BE MY 7TH YEAR DANCING.

I CAME TO COLUMBUS IN JUNE.

I FOUND THIS PLACE IN AUGUST AND IT'S BEEN WONDERFUL.

IT'S MY -- IT'S PROBABLY BEEN MY FAVORITE DANCE

STUDIO TO GO IN AND PRACTICE FROM.

HERE, IT'S KIND OF MORE -- IT'S MORE RELAXED.

IT'S MORE ABOUT THE ART THAN ANYTHING ELSE.

THAT'S KIND OF WHAT I FOUND UNIQUE HERE.

IT'S LIKE VISUAL POETRY.

I MEAN, A SONG COMES ON, YOU HEAR THE BEAT, YOUR

BODY STARTS BOUNCING, AND YOU'RE LIKE,

'CA CA CA AH!'

AND JUST LIKE GET TO IT.

IT'S JUST EXCITING.

>> UM, WITH B-BOY/B-GIRL, ORIGINALLY, THAT MEANT

BRONX BOY/BRONX GIRL BECAUSE THAT'S WHERE IT

ORIGINATED FROM.

AND THEN IT MOVED OUT OF THE BRONX AND THEY STARTED

CALLING IT 'BREAKIN' OR 'BREAK BOY/BREAK GIRL.'

AND THE TERM ORIGINALLY MEANS TO BREAK OUT AND DANCE.

WHEN THE MEDIA PICKED IT UP IN 1982, THEY STARTED

CALLING IT 'BREAKDANCING' BECAUSE WE DANCED TO THE

BREAK OF THE MUSIC.

COINCIDENTALLY, THAT'S WHAT WE DO DANCE TO.

SO, BREAKING, THE ORIGINAL STYLE OF HIP-HOP, STARTED

IN THE LATE '60S IN THE BRONX.

WHEN IT STARTED, IT WAS ONLY DANCING ON YOUR FEET.

WHEN CALIFORNIA STARTED PICKING IT UP, THEY REALLY

STARTED PUTTING IN THE POWER MOVES.

AND NOW, IT'S, YOU KNOW, IT'S A ALMOST A MUST THAT

YOU MIX ALL THESE TOGETHER.

THERE ARE FOUR PARTS, MAIN PARTS, TO THE DANCE.

THERE'S TOPROCK, WHICH IS LIKE DANCING ON YOUR FEET.

THAT'S YOUR INTRODUCTION.

THEN, WHEN YOU GET DOWN TO THE GROUND, YOU GOT YOUR

FOOTWORK, WHICH IS DANCING ON YOUR HANDS AND FEET.

TOP.

GO BACK TO SQUAT.

FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT.

AND GO.

FREEZES, OR JUST STOP IN-MOTION, AND POWER

MOVES, WHICH ARE -- THE POWER MOVES ARE WHAT

BREAKIN' IS KNOWN FOR.

THE WINDMILLS, THE HEAD SPINS, STUFF ON YOUR HANDS.

AND I THINK THIS IS WHERE A LOT OF THE

MISCONCEPTIONS OF BREAKING CAME FROM IS THAT IT'S FREESTYLE.

WHICH IT IS, BUT I THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE THINK

FREESTYLE IS DOING WHATEVER YOU WANT, HOWEVER YOU WANT.

AND WHAT ACTUALLY -- WITH BREAKING AND POPPING AND

ALL THIS STUFF, FREESTYLE IS FREESTYLING WITH

THE MOVES GIVEN.

>> MY NAME IS LUCI AND MY B-GIRL NAME IS MISFIT.

AND I'VE BEEN DANCING FOR TWO YEARS.

THE THING THAT I LOVE ABOUT IT IS THAT I GET TO

MAKE NEW FRIENDS AND JAMIE, WHICH IS OUR

INSTRUCTOR, HE DOESN'T JUST TEACH DANCING, HE

TEACHES, LIKE, BEHAVIOR AND STUFF, WHICH I REALLY LIKE.

ANOTHER THING THAT I REALLY LIKE ABOUT, LIKE,

GOING TO THESE CLASSES AND STUFF, IS THAT IT'S NOT

ALL CHOREOGRAPHED.

WHERE YOU CAN -- HE TEACHES YOU THESE MOVES

AND THEN YOU CAN MIX 'EM UP AND MAKE 'EM INTO

SOMETHING ELSE.

>> FLAVOR'D FLOW IS ALL ABOUT HAVING FLAVOR IN YOUR FLOW.

AND FLOW'S JUST ABOUT HOW YOU'RE -- YOU PUT YOUR

DANCE TOGETHER AND WHAT YOU CHOOSE, TOO.

SO WHAT YOU LEARN IN THESE MOVES IS HOW YOU FLOW WITH

IT, YOU KNOW?

SO, JUST LIKE I TRY NOT TO TEACH CHOREOGRAPHY, I DON'T

WANT YOU TO LEARN MY DANCE, I WANT YOU TO LEARN THE DANCE.

AND THEN I WANT YOU TO FLOW AND PUT YOUR

FLAVOR/STYLE INTO HOWEVER YOU WANT TO.

NICE, GUYS.

SPIN AND FREEZE.

TEACHING THE YOUNG ONES, I WANT TO ALSO INSTILL A LOT

OF THE VALUES AND VIRTUES SUCH AS COURAGE, SELF-ESTEEM.

>> WELL, I'VE ALWAYS LOVED MUSIC AND DANCING, BUT I'M

-- I GOT ADHD, SO I'M ALWAYS ACTIVE AND I ALWAYS

HAVE ENERGY SO THIS KIND OF GETS MY ENERGY OUT SOMETIMES

FOR THE NEXT DAY SO I'M NOT ALL CRAZY AND GRUMPY.

>> YOU KNOW, IF YOU GIVE 'EM CHARACTER,

PERSONALITY, AND HARD WORK, THEY'RE GONNA

FULFILL THEIR DREAM AND WORK HARD AT IT.

I SEE YOU GUYS ALL GROWING AND I LOVE IT.

I'M SUPER PROUD OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU GUYS.

THIS IS THE BEST WAY I CAN GIVE BACK.

YOU KNOW, IF I CAN CHANGE SOMEONE'S LIFE, I'VE DONE

MY JOB, I FEEL.

[APPLAUSE]

THAT NOSTALGIC FEELING.

I DESCRIBE MY WORK AS TRADITIONAL,

VINTAGE-INSPIRED, AND HISTORIC.

I PRETTY MUCH KEEP IT, FOR A LACK OF BETTER TERM,

ALL OLD SCHOOL.

MY NAME IS DEREK MCDONALD AND I'M A SIGN PAINTER.

I WAS THE QUINTESSENTIAL CREATIVE KID THAT WOULD

FLIP OVER HIS MATH TEST AND DRAW SILLY PICTURES ON

THE BACK AND I WAS ALSO AND STILL AM INTO OLD CARS.

SO I STARTED GOING TO ALL THESE CAR SHOWS AND I SAW

LOTS OF PINSTRIPING ON MOTORCYCLE TANKS AND HOT

RODS AND LOWRIDERS.

AND I STARTED GETTING REALLY INTO THAT AND THAT

LED ME INTO THE WORLD OF LETTERING SIGNS BECAUSE

THEY'RE VERY PARALLEL WORLDS AND THAT'S

BASICALLY HOW I DIVED INTO IT.

I JUST GENUINELY WAS REALLY INTO ANYTHING WITH

A HISTORIC FEEL OR A VINTAGE KIND OF FEEL TO IT.

WHEN I BEGIN TO WORK ON A PROJECT, THE MOST

IMPORTANT STEP IS BREAKING INTO MY REFERENCE MATERIAL.

I'VE GOT REALLY OLD RARE SIGN PAINTING MANUALS AND

TRADE BOOKS AND MAGAZINES, OLD YELLOW PAGE BOOKS,

THEY HAVE GREAT ILLUSTRATIONS.

I COLLECT VINTAGE MATCHBOOKS.

RIGHT NOW I HAVE OVER 700 AND EACH ONE OF THEM HAS

AWESOME REALLY INSPIRING ARTWORK ON THEM, I'LL JOT

OFF THREE OR FOUR SKETCHES, I'LL REFINE IT

AND I MAKE THE SIGN.

MATERIALS I WORK WITH VARY.

OF COURSE MY MAIN THING IS PAINT AND THAT'S A VERY

SPECIFIC PAINT DESIGNED FOR INDUSTRIAL ART.

SO IT'S OIL-BASED, IT'S CALLED LETTERING ENAMEL.

WHEN I WORK WITH GLASS ON A STOREFRONT WINDOW, I TRY

TO CREATE ALMOST LIKE A LITTLE FANTASY WORLD EVEN

IF IT'S JUST ONE WINDOW IN ONE STOREFRONT AND

SOMEBODY'S JUST GONNA WALK BY IT FOR EIGHT SECONDS.

AT LEAST I CREATED THAT LITTLE TINY FANTASY WORLD

FOR JUST THAT SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME FOR THAT PERSON

AND THEY MIGHT LOOK AT SOMETHING I MADE AND GO,

"THAT'S THE WAY THEY USED TO DO THINGS." SO IT ALL

KINDA COMES BACK TO THAT NOSTALGIC FEELING.

NOT ONLY DO I GO PAINT GLASS WINDOWS ONSITE BUT

I'LL ALSO DO PIECES IN MY SHOP.

MY SHOP IS BASED RIGHT HERE IN RENO.

SO LET'S ASSUME I'M GONNA MAKE YOUR TRADITIONAL

WOODEN SIGN THAT'S GONNA HANG OVER A STOREFRONT.

I'LL HAVE TO GO TO MY SCRAP WOOD PILE WHICH IS

IN MY GARAGE RIGHT NOW.

I'VE GOT TONS OF OLD SIGN BOARD.

I'LL HAND CUT THE BOARDS, I'LL EDGE SEAL 'EM, PRIME

'EM, AND THEN BASE COAT THEM.

THESE WERE BLUE COLLAR, GET IT OUT THE DOOR THINGS

BACK IN THE DAY.

SOME OF THESE SHOPS WERE UNION, AND THEY WOULD HAVE

10 SIGN PAINTERS ALL IN A LINE AND THEY WERE

KNOCKING OUT THESE, AND YOU CAN SEE THEY DEVELOPED

THESE TECHNIQUES OVER YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS

WHERE THEY CAN GET A REALLY EFFICIENT SIGN OR A

REALLY EFFICIENT LETTER PAINTED IN A VERY SHORT

AMOUNT OF TIME.

THERE'S JUST A CERTAIN FEEL TO SOME OF THESE

SIGNS WHERE YOU GO, "THAT'S A 1930S SIGN RIGHT

THERE." YOU'LL SEE THESE CERTAIN CHARACTERISTICS IN

THE LETTERS WHERE THEY'LL PULL THE BRUSH AND FLICK

THE BRUSH OUT AT THE VERY END AND YOU'LL SEE THESE

LITTLE BRUSH FLICK OUTS, THAT WAS A SPEED AND

EFFICIENCY TECHNIQUE.

YOU ONLY SEE THAT IN THOSE OLD VINTAGE SIGNS.

ONE OF MY FAVORITE THINGS TO WORK ON IS OLD

VEHICLES, UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH OLD TRUCK

DOORS, DOING LETTERING JOBS ON OLD TRUCKS.

I HAVE A BUDDY WHO'S A VINTAGE TRUCK COLLECTOR

AND HE BOUGHT THIS TRUCK FROM AN OLD FELLOW IN IDAHO.

IT'S A 1959 CHEVY STEPSIDE TRUCK.

SO I'M GONNA PAINT DECLO CATTLE CO.

AND A BIG BLACK AND WHITE COW, THEN I'M GONNA DO THE

PROCESS OF AGING THE SIGN BACK.

SO THE PROCESS OF CREATING AN AGED SIGN OR A

DISTRESSED SIGN IS A MULTI-STEP PROCESS.

I KINDA THIN THE PAINT DOWN A LITTLE BIT, I PUT A

LITTLE BIT OF TALCUM POWDER INTO THE PAINT, IT

ACTUALLY FLATTENS THE SHEEN SO IT WON'T BE SUPER

HIGH GLOSS AND THE PAINT WILL BE KIND OF DELUDED SO

IT'S NOT VERY OPAQUE, SO IT'S ALREADY KIND OF TRANSLUCENT.

ONCE IT'S DRY, THEN I JUST START WIPING BACK WITH

SOME SOLVENTS LIKE ACETONE OR MINERAL SPIRITS AND YOU

START RUBBING BACK ON THE LETTERS AND YOU FOLLOW THE

SAME DIRECTION THAT YOUR BRUSH STROKES GO.

THAT WAY YOU REVEAL BACK THE ACTUALLY BRUSH STROKES.

WHAT I REALLY GET OUT OF THE END OF THE DAY IS

CREATING THAT NOSTALGIC FEELING AND WHEN I THINK

I'VE REALLY NAILED THAT, THAT'S THE BIGGEST REWARD I GET.

USING THE NATURE OF IMPERFECTION.

I LIKE WORKING IN WOOD BECAUSE I LIKE TO RECYCLE

THE WOOD THAT'S AROUND THE VALLEY HERE.

WHETHER IT BE ABSTRACT OR REALISM ART.

I LOOK AT MY PAST EXPERIENCE IN ANTHROPOLOGY

AND THE CULTURE OF MAN, WHETHER IT BE CULTURAL OR

PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, AND THEN I TRY TO INCORPORATE

THAT INTO THE WOOD.

WHETHER IT BE NATIVE AMERICAN IMAGES OR IMAGES

THAT PROJECT CERTAIN LIFESTYLES OF MAN, THAT'S

WHAT I CREATE MY WORK ON.

I STUDY THE WOOD FIRST AND THEN I CREATE A SCULPTURE

THAT WILL ENHANCE IT AND IT CREATES MY PIECES.

I, I LOVE IT.

A LOT OF TIMES WHEN I DO START WITH A PIECE OF

WOOD, SUCH AS A BLOCK, A LOG, OR ASH, OR WHATEVER

THE TYPE OF WOOD IT MAY BE, AND I START TO WORK

THE WOOD INTO THE SCULPTURE AND THEN I

FIGURE OUT LATER ON THERE IS AN IMPERFECTION IN THE WOOD.

WHETHER IT BE A KNOT OR SPLIT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WOOD,

I JUST MAKE THAT PART OF THE SCULPTURE AND WORK WITH IT.

SOMETIMES IMPERFECTIONS IN A PIECE OF WOOD ENHANCES

MY SCULPTURE.

I DON'T USE ANY LIQUID STAINS.

I LIKE USING THE MORE NATURAL STAINS.

AND I LIKE A MORE NATURAL FINISH TO ENHANCE THE WOOD

GRAIN AND ALSO THE WOOD.

AND THEN WHEN I DO FINISH A WORK, AS FAR AS WAXING

IT, IT'S ALL HAND WAXED AND HAND POLISHED.

I'VE ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN THE ARTS BUT LATER ON

I DEVELOPED THAT INTEREST INTO MORE OF THE MUSEUM FIELD.

AND NOW THAT I'M RETIRED I CAN GO BACK INTO THE ART

FIELD AND SHARE IT WITH MY FELLOW ARTISTS AND WITH

THE COMMUNITY HERE IN THE VALLEY.

REFLECTING AND REFRACTING COLORS.

()

THE TYPE OF GLASSBLOWING THAT I

SPECIALIZE IN IS FURNACE WORK OR OFFHAND GLASSBLOWING.

BASICALLY, WE START WITH A FRESH BALL OF MOLTEN GLASS

ON THE END OF A BLOW PIPE OR A SOLID ROD THAT WE CAN

TRANSFORM INTO MANY DIFFERENT FORMS.

()

WE CAN ADD COLORS, WE CAN ADD DESIGNS,

ACTUALLY, THE POSSIBILITIES ARE PROBABLY

LIMITLESS IN WHAT WE CAN DO.

WE'RE JUST LIMITED TO OUR SKILLSETS AND WE'RE

LIMITED TO THE EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS THAT WE HAVE

ON-HAND.

I GOT STARTED IN GLASSBLOWING IN COLLEGE.

I GOT INTERESTED IN GLASSBLOWING AS A

TEENAGER, SAW IT ON PUBLIC TELEVISION, YEAH.

FOUND A UNIVERSITY THAT TAUGHT GLASSBLOWING AND

MOVED TO CINCINNATI.

IT'S UNLIKE ANY OTHER ART FORM.

AND IT'S NOT SOMETHING THAT YOU CAN JUST START A

PIECE, PUT IT DOWN, GO TO LUNCH, COME BACK.

YOU HAVE TO GET EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET DONE

WITHIN THAT ONE SETTING.

NOT TO SAY YOU CAN'T REVISIT PIECES LATER UNDER

CERTAIN TECHNIQUES, BUT REALLY, THE IDEA OF

GETTING THAT ONE SHOT AT IT.

THAT ONE SHOT.

I LIKE IT.

GLASS HAS ITS OWN FLUIDITY, ITS OWN MOTION.

AND ONE OF THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTIONS WITH GLASS

IS THAT IT'S A TESTOSTERONE-DRIVEN EVENT.

YOU NEED TO BE STRONG, YOU NEED TO BE MANLY, WHEN IN

FACT, IF YOU GET THE GLASS AT THE RIGHT HEAT, IT'S A

FINESSE GAME AND IT CAN ALMOST TURN INTO A VERY

ALMOST POETIC DANCE WITH THE GLASS.

YOU SEE SOMEONE JUST, THE MOTION OF THAT GLASS

SWINGING AROUND AS THEY'RE MAKING THEIR MOVES.

YOU HAVE TO HAVE A LOT OF FINESSE TO HANDLE THIS MATERIAL.

YOU CAN'T LET IT CONTROL YOU.

OFTENTIMES THE GLASS WILL CONTROL YOU AND YOU NEED

TO TAKE CHARGE AND CONTROL THAT GLASS.

()

GLASS HAS BEEN DATED BACK, THEY'VE FOUND

EXAMPLES OF IT IN ANCIENT EGYPT, MESOPOTAMIA, IT

BECAME A LOST ART FORM AND WHILE THE BULK OF

EVERYTHING THAT WAS BEING MADE HISTORICALLY HAD SOME

SORT OF A FUNCTION TO IT, WE SAW GLASS, YOU KNOW,

LATE 19TH, EARLY 20TH CENTURY AND IT WAS

A LOT OF MANUFACTURING.

AND IT WASN'T UNTIL THE '60S OR '70S RIGHT HERE IN

OHIO, THAT THE STUDIO GLASS MOVEMENT STARTED.

AND IT WAS JUST AN EXPERIMENTAL THING.

IT STARTED IN A GARAGE.

SOME OF THE THING I REALLY LIKE TO INCORPORATE INTO

PRODUCTION WORK OR ANY OF MY OWN EVERY DAY WORK IS

JUST OLD VENETIAN TECHNIQUES THAT HAD BEEN

KEPT SECRET FOR HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS OF YEARS, AND

SOMEBODY LEAKED THE SECRETS AND THESE UNITED

STATES ARTISTS ARE PICKING UP ON IT AND REALLY

CAPITALIZING ON THESE TECHNIQUES AND KIND OF

TWEAKING THEM AND MAKING THEM THEIR OWN.

BUT WHEN WE DEAL WITH COLOR, WE OFTEN HAVE TO

CONSIDER THE LIGHT SOURCE IN WHICH THIS IS GOING TO

BE VIEWED UNDER.

IT IS POSSIBLE TO MAKE SOMETHING THAT DOESN'T RESEMBLE

GLASS, THAT YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT LIGHT.

SOMETHING I'M ATTRACTED TO IS HOW THE LIGHT REFLECTS,

REFRACTS, PENETRATES, SHINES BACK THROUGH

PIECES, CAN REFLECT THESE COLORS ONTO WALLS, ONTO SURFACES,

I FIND THAT A VERY DYNAMIC AND A VERY APPEALING ASPECT TO GLASS.

IT'S AN ART FORM UNLIKE ANY OTHER.

AND THERE'S, THERE'S A, A VERY CALCULATED PROCESS TO

MAKING YOUR PIECES.

AND EACH PIECE IS DIFFERENT.

IT'S A SURPRISE TO A LOT OF PEOPLE ABOUT WHAT

REALLY GOES INTO MAKING A PIECE OF GLASS.

()

THE BULK OF OUR BUSINESS HERE AT NEUSOLE

IS COMMUNITY EDUCATION.

SO WE TEACH WORKSHOPS SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

AND THE PROCESS IS ALLOWING AS MUCH HANDS-ON

POSSIBLE TO THAT CLIENT.

WE WANT TO MAKE THEM FEEL LIKE THEY GET THE MOST OUT

OF THEIR MONEY.

SO WE DO OFFER THEM A CHANCE TO HOLD THOSE BLOW

PIPES, TO WALK AROUND, FEEL THAT PIPE IN THEIR

HAND WITH LIQUID GLASS ON THE END.

IT'S A TEAM EFFORT.

EVEN WHEN WE GET INTO THE PRODUCTION OF PIECES.

GLASSBLOWING IS NOT A SOLO SPORT.

YOU NEED PEOPLE AROUND YOU THAT YOU TRUST.

YOU NEED PEOPLE AROUND YOU THAT YOU TRUST THEIR SKILLSETS.

I NEVER MAKE ANYTHING WITH LESS THAN ONE ASSISTANT.

VERY RARELY WILL I WORK SOLO.

AND I'VE WORKED ON PRODUCTION TEAMS OF TEN

PLUS PEOPLE TO MAKE A PIECE.

THE MOST SATISFYING THING PEOPLE TAKE AWAY, FOR ME,

IS WHEN THEY SEE THE PRICE OF THE GLASS AND THEY'RE

LIKE, "WOW, WHY DOES THAT COST SO MUCH?"

AND THEN THEY DO IT AND THEY REALIZE THIS ISN'T

FOUR CUPS FOR $4 FROM THE SUPERSTORE.

NO, THIS ISN'T MACHINE-MADE GLASS, AND

THAT THERE IS A CRAFT BEHIND IT.

THERE'S DEFINITELY A CRAFT, DEFINITELY A

SKILLSET THAT IT TAKES TO ACHIEVE A FINAL PRODUCT.

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