Colores

FULL EPISODE

¡COLORES! October 17, 2014

Grammy award-winning producer, engineer and performer Larry Mitchell has toured the world playing guitar with well-known artists, including Tracy Chapman, Billy Squier, and Ric Ocasek. In a special performance, Larry weaves guitar textures that showcase his virtuosity.

AIRED: October 17, 2014 | 0:27:04
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

>>Narrator: THIS TIME,

ON COLORES!

>>SANTA FE'S GRAMMY

AWARD-WINNER LARRY MITCHELL

HAS TOURED THE WORLD PLAYING

GUITAR WITH ARTISTS INCLUDING

TRACY CHAPMAN, BILLY SQUIER,

AND RIC OCASEK. IN A SPECIAL

COLORES PERFORMANCE LARRY

SHOWCASESHIS VIRTUOSITY.

"When I create music I'm doing

it for me first and then when

you play it you realize it's

no longer for you. You're

sharing it. You can play music

PHOTOGRAPHER SYD MOEN CREATES

"LITTLE PLANETS.

"A 360 degree panorama is

a spherical image. You can see

the 3-D aspect on a computer.

But a littleplanet is the same

image only it's mapped 2-D.

And so that's the whole image

that you see around

you."PORTLAND LOCALS SHARE

THE ART OF COMEDY.

>>"You have to be really good

at failing, like a lot. Like

a lot, a lot, because

sometimes it's gonna be

awesome and the rest

of the time it's just gonna be

maybe the worst thing you've

done to yourself."

AN ENTIRE NEIGHBORHOOD HELPED

PATRICK RENNER REALIZE

HIS CREATIVE VISION.

>>"I think public art is

incredibly important

because it reflects whatever's

going on in society. Itcan

either be something just

a pure pleasure or maybe it

can catalyze conversation

around differentissues."

>>IT'S ALL AHEAD ON COLORES!

>>LARRY MITCHELL SHARES HOW

[musical opening]

>>Larry Mitchell: The guitar

is such an instrument that

you can create soft textures

and wild and crazy, loud,

screaming, angry textures.

So I like air, I like

the acoustic guitar, nylon

strings sound, I like

the soaring screaming rock

lead guitar and everything

>>Hakim Bellamy: Why is

the sound mix so important?

>>Mitchell: I like textures,

I've always been into messing

with sounds and how do

you change it, howdo you get

it to sound like something

else. And that's a big point

into the texture of it

and getting a reaction

from different people as well,

setting the mood. I like

sounds where I can play one

note and its going to twist

and turn and float across

the air for like 20 seconds.

From one note, you know.

>>Bellamy: What does

communication mean to you?

>>Mitchell: I mean, we have

to communicate; otherwise

we are building walls all

the time, which leadto not

good things. I like, I think

you can communicate

with music, with words,

with eyes, just sharing, to me

And communicating back

and forth, not just one way.

>>Bellamy: What is it that

you love about collaborations?

>>Mitchell: Seeing where

people go. If I write a piece

all by myself, I have a good

idea where it's going, where

it's going to go. You can get

into a meditative state

or you can get into a spot

where you feel a little freer,

you test the water, you stick

your toes out there a little

bit, you put your heart out

there a little bit. But when

you work with someone else,

you have no idea where

they aregoing to go with it.

>>Bellamy: What is the context

for really rich collaboration,

when does it really work?

>>Mitchell: For me,

collaboration works best when

you let go of ego and you work

for the better of the whole

piece. I kind of feel like

with music, we are carving out

space, we're carving out

the space around the notes.

The notes, the music is there,

you just got to carve out.

So a lot of times, silence is

good. Finding someone that

isn't afraid to try stuff

and not worry about judgment,

not worrying about judgment

from your own self,

or judgment from the person

you're writing with.

>>Bellamy: (Starts Poem)

If there is truth in truth

then it's true, that the heart

is the size of a fist and when

you open it up it looks like

this. If it's true that

the heart is the size

of a fist and when you open it

up it looks like this. If it's

true what the say about hearts

when you put two together, do

they beatbox? Is it true that

they inflate or flutter

from time to time when

the heart of another, girl

or guy enter the room. Yeah

I heard that four four, that

'doomf' 'doomf', that beat

bop, that boom bap, I heard

that if you put your heart

in your hand, off your sleeve,

to your ear, it'll sound like

you are sure. It will sound

like you are sure. I can hear

a heart stop, like an attack

at first sight, like cupid

arrest, arrow to your chest

as you put both your fist

shaped hearts inthe sky like

whoooooaaaa. Like you're

the neighbor, like there is

a fist shaped party

in your chestbeating

you to death, like there is

no revolution without love

in the middle of it, and love,

my love is the only revolution

that fits in the small

of your hand. If it's true

that the heart is the size

of a fist, when you open it up

it looks like help. It looks

like hi and high fives, like

a good poker face will never

beat a pair of hearts

with hinges that bend,

but don't break or go broke

because a pair of hearts is

the exact same size as a patty

cake, or a handshake,

or the wing tips on the end

of a hug. So fold all five,

or ten or so of your fingers

and embrace the person next

to you because an open hand is

the same size as an open seat,

if it's you. So let's assume

the truth is true, that

your open hand is simply

a reflection of your heart

outside of you.

>>Bellamy: What is inspiring

to you about music?

>>Mitchell: It's another

language. You can play music

and instantly people smile.

You can go to another country

where people don't speak

the language and play music

and the same reaction will

happen in different countries.

It's meditative. It speaks

to people in a different way.

It evokes different moods

and attitudes and reactions

and memories. >>Bellamy:

Understanding people's

relationship with music like

that, what is it like to be

able to create those

experiences, to create those

connections to people?

>>Mitchell: It's exciting.

You know when I create music,

I'm doing it for me first,

and then when you play it

you realize it's no longer

for you, you're sharing.

I think when you create art,

you're creating something

for yourself and then when

you open up and share it

with people that's when

you actually feel vulnerable,

but you're exposing a big part

of yourself. I love

the reaction, I love the way

it makes me feel, I love

the way it makes other people

feel. It's a conversation.

[musical out]

>>SYD MOEN USES WIDE-ANGLE

PHOTOGRAPHY TO CREATE "LITTLE

PLANETS."

>>My name is Syd Moen and I'm

a Houston photographer.

>>Photography has always

resonated with me. I've always

enjoyed photography.

I like the spatial aspect

of VR photography because it

ties into architecture

and history and place.

I saw a little planet about 4

years ago on the internet

and I thought to myself "I can

do that". AndI found it very

interesting... I've always

been intrigued with

the spatial aspect

of spherical photography.

VR photography is virtual

reality photography.

So if you've ever gone

to Google maps and looked

at astreet view and you can

pan around and see 360 degrees

around that block... that's VR

photography. So a

stereographic projection is

a mapping term and that's how

a 3-D sphere is mapped 2-D.

So you see a globe

of the earth that you can

turn... that's a 3-D thing

but you can also see maps

of the world that are 2-D.

that would be a stereographic

projection.

I take 30 photographs

so I take a picture, picture,

picture. So it's 360 degrees

all the way around and I get

all the sky and the ground.

Then I take it into

the computer and I stitch

the image together. There are

a lot of seams so there's

a bit of time in that.

And then I use mapping

software to help me get

the little planet view.

A 360 degree panorama is

a spherical image. You can see

the 3-D aspect on a computer.

But a little planet is

the same image only it's

mapped 2-D. And so that's

the whole image that you see

around you.

Well what I like about little

planets. It's not like

a traditional panorama where

you're kind of looking like

this. It's all in front

of you. I think that's what

attracts me to it. And it's

different.I like that it's

different. It's a little

surrealistic and I like that.

I'm always surprised at people

who say "oh I know that". Well

you get an A+ cuz you've named

all the locations. Sometimes

I think some of them are

little obscure.

I think what first attracts

people is whether it's

an iconic image... let's say

like the river oaks theater

which everybody loves that

one. I want you to look

at that. I just want

you attract you to my art

first. Usually that's what it

is: it'll be some iconic image

that people know, resonates

with them. Once they get

into it, you'll see people

turning head because they're

looking around and they'll go

"oh there's that shop there".

So you do connect to a place

even though it may not be

the big fancy place. It's

the little place that you see.

My favorite one is the Shrimp

Boats. It was taken down

in Galveston where the Shrimp

boats come in. I can't get

the view now because there's

a building but it was

a spectacular sky and I love

being inthe water. Working

people are interesting too.

Little planets... it's kind

of the idea that the world

revolves around me. A little

planet is a way to view one

location where everything is

focused on that one location.

You can see all around it

butmaybe you're focusing

on a little bit more than one

part. It's just kind

of a celebration of place.

>>Hello, hi everybody. Aww,

I love you guys. Thank

you so much for coming out

to Down to Funny at the East

Burn, we're here two times

a month. KATIE BRIEN HAS A DAY

JOB, BUT THIS IS WHAT

SHE REALLY LOVES TO DO.

I've been in Portland a few

years now, I'm from Southern

California, and there's some

things here that are really

different from where I grew

up.

SHE'S THE HOST OF DOWN

TO FUNNY, A SHOWCASE

OF UP-AND-COMING LOCAL STANDUP

COMEDIANS. HERE'S TONIGHT'S

LINEUP:

Danny Felts, D A N N Y F E L T

S.

THESE PEOPLE ARE FUNNY JUST

SPELLING THEIR NAME.

Dan Duncan, D U D (Laugh)

THE MATERIAL RANGES

FROM FAMILY FRIENDLY TO RACY,

AND ALL THE COMEDIANS ARE HERE

TO SHARPEN THEIR SKILLS.

What could be more Portland

than...one time I thought

to myself, I was on a bus

I was like, I've gotit! What

could be more Portland than

a pirate on a bike? I think

I'm epic, I think I'm really

quite epic, I'm not really

even close. Three days later

I'm on Hawthorne Street

and Portland replies tome,

with a bagpiper on a unicycle.

Like, I can't top that.

You have to be really good

at failing, like a lot. Like

a lot, a lot, because

sometimes it's gonna be

awesome and the rest

of the time it's just gonna be

maybe the worst thing you've

done to yourself.

(sound of explosion)

Behold, beautiful Portland

Oregon the descriptive

positive noun of

the Northwest. Portland is

home to a moderately large

amount of people most of whom

are from place other than

Oregon.

You guys ever stand at one end

of a hammock and make

the Spiderman hand so it looks

like your web isshooting

across to the other tree?

(laugh)

Everybody give a big warm

welcome for Shane Torres.

My name is Shane Torres.

I received that name

because my mother is an Irish

immigrant, and my father was

a Mexican immigrant, and that

makes me Catholic (laugh).

And this year for Lent I'm

giving uphope. It's a dumb

name, Shane Torres, cause

Shane is like extremely Irish

and Torres is like the Smith

of Mexican last names, but it

could have been so much worse.

Like if my Dad had been Irish

and my Mom had been Mexican

my parents could have named

my something like Juan

McDougall. (laugh)

DOWN TO FUNNY STARTED WHEN

KATIE ASKED AN EAST PORTLAND

BAR TO TAKE A CHANCE. EAST

BURN OFFERED THETAP ROOM,

USUALLY A HOME FOR SPORTS

FANS. THE SHOW IS FREE,

AND IT'S SLOWLY BUILDING

AN AUDIENCE

>>I saw this place that opened

up recently, I don't know

if anybody saw it, called Club

Soda....(laugh). I'm like that

is tasteless.

I understand everything is

perspective, I just don't look

at it that way.

We have turned people who were

here for Monday Night

Football, we've turned them

around from the TV screen

and they have watched

the entire show.

Comedy is tragedy plus time.

I was asked to teach a women

in standup comedy workshop

at the Siren Nation Festival

that they have every year

at The Kennedy School.

Doing standup is the best

therapy I have ever had.

Besides my therapist. What

I really enjoy aboutit is

telling embarrassing stories

that people can relate to.

The greatest feeling ever is

when something happens

and when something hits

you and you're like "oh,that's

a joke."

KATIE ASKS HER STUDENTS

TO BRAINSTORM IDEAS

FROM THEIR OWN LIVES, THEN

THEY BEGIN TO SHARE. We did

the bike commute challenge

at work a couple months ago,

we had a group ride and it

ended up being two of us

and so...

Then the woman stands up

and she says "that was

the longest flight I've ever

been on". IT'S A START,

AND KATIE WANTS HER STUDENTS

WANTS HER STUDENTS TO LEARN

MORE ABOUT THE STRUCTURE

OF COMEDY.

The topic is what your joke is

about. The attitude is how

you feel about it,

and the premise is your point

of view on the subject.

It's scary, but it's so worth

it. I'm really, I love is

so much.

For me it was just

about showing how to use humor

as a way to deal with things,

cause that's exactlywhat I do.

I'm gonna do a joke

for you guys. I love being

an aunt to my sister's kids.

Because you get to hang out

with these little kids,

they think you're awesome,

they're way cooler

with you than they are

with their parents, so I like

take my nieces out get em all

jacked up on sugar

and caffeine, and thenas soon

as they start acting like

brats and pooping their pants

I just drop em back off

at my sister's doorstep

and I go and have a life. It's

such a sweet deal, right?

I really love being an aunt

to my sister's kids, but what

I'm really excited about, is

someday being an aunt

to my own kids. I mean I know

I'm gonna be a really good

mom, but no one is ever gonna

come before me...... (laugh).

What we have here in Portland

right now with the amount

of talent we have, it's

something that couldbe

special, you know? Someday

maybe people like (knocks

on table) in 15 or 20 years

will look backon and say, that

was an important scene. There

was so much talent that came

out of that one area.

I'm a big worrier. I worry

a lot. I thought my generation

was constantly letting me

down. I don'tthink anyone

in my generation knows how

to protest right. It's

a really simple skill,

but they constantly keep

messing it up. Like a friend

of mine dragged me

to an Occupy protest a few

months ago,and I really wanted

to get behind the cause

but I couldn't. Cause one

joker there who's walking

around with this giant sign

that just read 'Government

Abuse is Child Abuse."

And that doesn't make any

sense. That's not how

you protest. You don't just

put two things you don't like

together, and go, checkmate,

your move government. (laugh)

I love Christopher Walken

and groovy 60's music so much

that when Christopher Walken

dies I would like to have

an entire outfit made out

of him, just so, when

someone's like, hey Katie,

I like your boots, I can be

like, oh these? These boots

were made from Walken. I don't

want to make money off of it,

and I don't want to be famous,

and I don't want to be cool,

I just want to put

on something that makes people

laugh, and that makes people

happy. Thank you

for supporting live comedy,

and, we'll see you soon.

(applause)

>>This is Montrose Boulevard,

which of course is a main

corridor in the arts district,

uh, spanning from Allen

Parkway on up to the cluster

of museums... the CAM...the

MFA. So, this is a really

ideal central location that

we're at... where the Art

League Houston is sited.

You know, there's a fair

amount of traffic that comes

by each day, so it's great

to have something

so visible... uh...

on a thoroughfare. That is

'Funnel Tunnel' - a sculpture

that is created from a steel

armature... um, woven

with recycled painted wood.

It's 180 feet long and it's

fairly consistently five feet

in diameter all the way

through - until the tail end,

which tapers to a point.

And then, on the other end it,

uh, flows out into a 12 foot

in diameter bell or horn.

There were four trees

on the median... laid out

in kind of a zigzag pattern

and I wanted to make sure this

was in concert with that.

You know, maybe it had

a conversation that happened

with those trees and also

with the traffic

and with the neighborhood

in general - and kind of spoke

to the energy of

the neighborhood.

I looked at the median and got

an idea of the scale...the

for a while in my head-

and eventually came up

with this design...

It's just made out of two

varieties of steel stock,

which is 3/8" round rod

and 1/4" round rod. So, it's

a very light framework that

we've created. And what that

looks like was, building these

sort ofnoodles.... Five foot

diameter tubes, basically...

with a very gentle bend.

And we made about 14 or 16

of those to the points where

it changes shapes at the end,

so one end is tapered

into kind of ahook... like

a scorpions tail...

and the other end.... Um ...

is uh.... It bells out

into a cone, or sort

of a trumpet. And, so,

the idea there is that each

end is unique and serves

a different function. Uh...

the hooked end was intended

to point...here to the Art

League...

Um... and then the... for me,

the interest in the bell,

or the cone end, was to sort

of serve as like

an announcement, but also

maybe to draw in people's

attention. So, just a fun way

to play with form.

So after the framework was

created we brought all

the pieces down to the median.

We started punching holes

in the ground with an auger...

setting pipes... and going

piece by piece...and putting

each one of the noodles

on the pipes and fixing those

in... so that, um, you know,

we could start to create

the flow through the median.

And then after the framework

was complete, it became

possible to start weaving

the material in, so,

the material that you're

looking at on the surface is

all from, uh, a turn

of the century, I guess like

1900s, cotton gin, which

I didn't realize anything like

that was still around, so....

And so I got all these

beautiful, huge...uh... old

growth pine planks, then

I started ripping them

into very thin 1/4" strips

that were then flexible

and able to be woven

into the surface.

So, after I created this bulk

of ripped material, I brought

it over to the Art League here

and we actually used the Texas

Art Supply parking lot which

is right next door

and sponsored a painting

party- where people

from the community could come

and they could really put

their creative mark on it. So,

it was of huge interest to me

that... we be able

to literally have

the community show up

in the project - and it was

really fun.

It feels great to really draw

an energy of others and to get

input too, so like the form

was predetermined,

but the surface was

by no means known to me, what

that would look like.

The color is based on a large

number of paints that were

left over, um, from people,

I was asking for people

to give me odds and ends

they had laying around

in their garage, or whatever.

And we also had a really nice

donation from the Valspar, uh,

Paint Company I guess it's

uniformly chaotic

on the surface, so it some how

works.

People blew through painting

all the material and they were

like, "hey, can we start

putting this into

the structure?" And...um...in

a matter of hours, they had

exhausted all the material

that was available and I had

to make more, so...

It's been a wonderful

and unexpectedly fun ride all

the way through, so I just

feel totally gratefulfor that.

There's been like a lot

of wonderful conversations

and great reactions that

people have given

about the project. Some people

have said "is it supposed

to be like a bird's head

on the end, where, you know,

where ittapers?" or "is it

a snake, is it a dragon, what

is it?" You know, for me it's

like, well, I'm interested

in what it looks like to you,

you know. Like, I just made

the form. It was sort

an intuitive form and beyond

that, whatever is associated

with it- great. And

my favorite thing is when

people from the neighborhood

say "we love this" because,

after all, they're the ones

that have to see it most

often, so I'm happy to know

that they like what's there.

I think public art is

incredibly important

because it reflects whatever's

going on in society. It can

either be, um, something just

a pure pleasure or maybe it

can catalyze conversation

around different issues.

And I think that's really

fascinating. There's really,

sort of, the 'no zoning'

aspect ofHouston, I think,

kind of, um, is reflected

in the way the boundaries

between different art types

here in town are

pretty...uh... you know...they

sort of bleed into one another

in a nice wa

NEXT TIME ON COLORES!

>>NEW MEXICO LANDSCAPE PAINTER

WOODY GWYN DEFINES WHAT

HE SEES.

>>"I like abstraction

by the way that seems rooted

in reality. And realism that

seems rooted in abstraction."

>>A PAINTER'S PAINTER, MAX

BECKMANN AVOIDED

IDENTIFICATION WITH

A PARTICULAR SCHOOL OR STYLE.

HIS WORK IS A CELEBRATION

OF PAINTING'S GRAND

TRADITIONS. >>"He's an artist,

who, uh, throughout his career

was always searching, uh,

for new modes of painting,

of print-making, of sculpture.

He experimented in, in all

of those areas. "NATIVE

AMERICAN ARTISTS ADDRESS

SAFEGUARDING TRADITION

IN THE FACE OF CHANGE

>>"They're offering positive

change in thinking

and creating new works that

give us a different way

of understanding indigenaeity

in contemporary society."

UNTIL NEXT TIME, THANK </TitlerData>

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