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FULL EPISODE

¡COLORES! February 18, 2017

Santa Fe-based Kiowa artist Teri Greeves’ beadwork comes from a desire to share universal stories. Funk and R&B band The Infatuations want to convey a message that speaks to people’s experience. Fashion designer Andrea Geer creates fun and expressive prints that also make a statement. And mural painter Hugo Medina works to give a place a soul.

AIRED: February 18, 2017 | 0:27:19
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

Funding for COLORES was

provided in part by:

The Nellita E. Walker Fund

KNME-TV Endowment Fund

The Great Southwestern Arts &

Education Endowment Fund

...and Viewers Like You

THIS TIME, ON COLORES!

SANTA FE BASED KIOWA TERI

GREEVES' BEAD WORK COMES

FROM A DESIRE TO SHARE

UNIVERSAL STORIES.

>>It is my prayer that

everything that I make helps

me become a better person,

to help my children understand

something, to be able

to communicate what it is

to be a 21st Century native

person. >>CELEBRATING

THE WELL-CRAFTED POP-SOUL

OF MOTOWN, FUNK AND R&B; BAND,

THE INFATUATIONS WANT

TO CONVEY A MESSAGE THAT

SPEAKS TO PEOPLES EXPERIENCE.

>>SPECIALIZING IN HAND-LOOMED

KNIT-WEAR, FASHION DESIGNER

ANDREA GEER

CREATES FUN AND EXPRESSIVE

PRINTS THAT ALSO MAKE

A STATEMENT. >>MURALPAINTER

HUGO MEDINA WORKS TO GIVE

A PLACE - SOUL.

>>Art moves people. It

motivates them. It stirs

emotion. So when you bring

those elements into

a neighborhood that doesn't

have it, it gives it life.

It's amazing to watch it

happen.

>>IT'S ALL AHEAD ON COLORES!

TERI GREEVES' BEADWORK CARRIES

TRADITION INTO THE FUTURE.

(music)

>>Greeves: The biggest driving

force behind what I do is

the desire or need to want

to communicate, or to reach

out to other people, and to,

in some way share

the universalities

of our stories. Very basic

things are important to all

human beings, families

our homes and our communities

and all of that and that's

something that culturally

drives all of us in culturally

different ways, but it's

something that I think that

all of us can come together

on.

(music)

>>My work starts for me,

usually as, the way I describe

it, it's like a rock

in my shoe. There's some

little something that's

in there that's rolling around

and I need to deal with it.

When my children were born,

I realized that I needed

to tell them stories. I needed

to tell them whothey were.

That is my job as

their mother. I was driven

initially by history, so I did

a whole bunch of work

about Kiowa history, specific

moments in time that I marked

visually to recognize

something that had happened.

And then that way I could show

them and tell them this

with these pictures thatI had

beaded. They love Spiderman.

They love Batman. They loved

all the hero stories. Well

Kiowas have a hero too.

The Sun boys, they are black

tennis shoes, those Sun Boy

shoes specifically came outof

that time period and the Sun

Boys themselves are our sacred

beings, but they're also

the archetypal hero story that

goes across the planet.

When the election of Barack

Obama happened, I started

thinking about the vote. How

did we as native people get

the vote? What was the history

of the vote for native people,

because I knew we weren't

considered citizens

of the United States until

1924. My grandmother was a 24

year old woman before she was

considered a citizen

of the United States

of America. Well, how does

that happen and what happened

and then how did we get

the citizenship and what led

up to that because I know

there must have been policy,

and all of that turned

into a piece, right, all

of that, that's the question

that rollsaround, a question

that needs to be answered,

and that's what I try to do

with my work and hopefully

communicate in some way

something that someone didn't

know.

My grandmother Susie Big Eagle

was a bead worker. Her mother

and her grandmother were

of the generation when

the beads first arrived here.

Kiowa women are the abstract

artists of our people

and Kiowa men are

the pictorial artists

of our people. The men tell

the history through

their pictures. The women

abstract the world. They're

known for these containers

that hold our most important

things. They're called

parfleches, rawhide

containers, and they're

painted with abstracted

designs all the way around

them. These boxes that contain

the food that fed

their family, the ceremonial

clothes that their children

wore and their families wore,

they're sacred objects,

their medicine. Their Indian

medicine, all of that stuff,

that's what they put in these

boxes. So, of course they were

decorated the way they were,

and of course this idea

of the world was embedded

on the outside of it

in mineral paint. So, when

the beads arrived from Europe

the women got ahold of this

new medium and there was

a moment in time at the turn

of the century when

the painting turned to beads.

And the objects stop

beingpainted and they started

being beaded. That is the line

that I come from. So, beads,

even though they're European,

they became Native

in her hands the way that

they're Native in my hands

and the way that they were

Native for all those women

that came before me, when

they got a new medium,

they turned it into something

very Kiowa. They turned it

into something very Native.

That is survival.

We co-opt a medium

or we subvert a word. All

of these things are ways that

we have survived with this

culture intact, and

with the ability to continue

to speak from our perspective.

(music)

>>There's power in

the stories. I made this book

that opens up into

a five-pointed star, so that

youcan walk around the object,

right, and you walk around it

the way that you walk around,

into a sacred space,

and you can read each story

on each page. It walks

you through part of this

ongoing story because it's

an epic story. The Sun Boys

story has helped me as a Kiowa

person to understand what

isimportant and I didn't

realize that I had heard

a part of that story when

I was a child, that my mother

had been always telling me

a part of that story, until

I was older and I got to see

and hear more of the story

and I realized that that

little piece was a part

of this much longer story

and that book, that was a way

for me to understand the Sun

Boys in my own way. He's like

our Jesus. He was the son

of the sun and the son

of an earth woman.

(music)

>>I always hope that my work

can bring people together

rather than pull them apart.

I deal with really ugly facts,

genocide is an ugly fact,

germ-warfare is an ugly fact.

Loss of land is an ugly

fact.Oil pipelines are an ugly

fact. These things can be

so difficult. They are

so awful to think about,right,

but they are us, and we can't

ignore them, right, we cannot

ignore them, and

so by addressing them

with beauty, yeah, that I can

counter the ugliness

of the story with the beauty

of the object. Like they say

it's not about the destination

it's about the journey, right,

and for me it is my prayer

that everything that I make

in some way or another helps

me become a better person

or helps me think

through something a little

clearer to help my children

understand something, to be

able to communicate in some

way what it is to be a 21st

century Native person. What it

is to have very important

things that need to be done

for our children to carry them

on into the next generation.

In the endall of these objects

that I make, that I hope

to continue to make, are

really prayers for the future.

>>THE INFATUATIONS WANT

AUDIENCES TO FORGET ABOUT ALL

OF THE MINUTIA THAT LIFE

BRINGS.

(Funk Music)

>>Christian Draheim: We're not

trying to chase a curve, we're

trying to focus on crafting

a better song when we write

our songs.

(Music)

>>Kendrick Hardaway For me,

real music it accomplishes

things.

Music is powerful, you know

and when you treat it right

then you can use that power

to make things happen.

(Music)

>>Right now when you look

at the industry I feel like

there are so many, what I like

to call microwave artists

and all the passion,

the musicianship, the talent,

the you know, all

of the heart, the blood,

the tears, the sweat that goes

into it is all lost on a lot

of this stuff.

>>Draheim: The Infatuations

was born. I think officially

April 4th of 2009. I think

we're a really good

Representation of, you know

a hybrid of a lot of different

music from a fan perspective.

You know, we're definitely

fans of music first

and I think that shows

in our writing and

our performance and the sounds

that we choose from guitar

tones to bass tones, drum

tones, et cetera.

The Infatuations musically are

heavily influenced by a lot

of music that's originated

in Detroit. Motown being

a huge influence on us

and a lot of the Detroit Rock

'n Roll that you hear that's

come out of here from I guess

the 60s up until now even.

>>Hardaway: I think there's

something you can pull

from everywhere you know

and if you don't pull

influences from all of those

different places I think

you're kind of depriving

yourself of something

as an artist.

(Music)

>>Draheim: The atmosphere

I think we're trying to create

is looking at the audience and

seeing a wide array of people

having a good time, getting

along.

>>Hardaway: When you look

at our shows, everybody's

there. You know, six to 60,

black, white, purple, green.

Everybody's there and I think

especially right now with all

of this tension we got going

on with race relations and all

of that like I think, you know

this is what we need.

>>Draheim: I think the biggest

reason to come to

an Infatuations concert is

to have a fantastic timeand

forget about all

of the minutia that life

brings us. Just a great place

to have a good time. That's

my favorite place to be is

on that stage with those guys

and gals.

(Music)

>>Draheim: We're all writing

collectively at this point.

>>Hardaway: I'm not gonna say

that every single song that's

written by The Infatuations

has this specific meaning

we're trying to get across.

You know in a lot of cases,

you know, we might have sat

down and we were just trying

to write a tune.

(Music)

>>Hardaway: And when that

thing is finished if whatever

it's become is that, you know,

if it's that thing that's got

a powerful message, if it's

really trying to convey

a certain thing then we'll let

it be that but I don't think

we set out to make something

specific like that. We just

let the music evolve

and I think that's when

the best music is made.

(Music)

>>Hardaway: Monster is

basically a warning

to the sweet little young girl

who is all starry-eyed

and in love with me,

but I just want to let

her know that hey I'm

a monster, so you just need

to be prepared because I'm

gonna take you on a ride.

(Music)

>>Draheim: I like The Beep.

I think it's one

of my favorite songs

to perform.

(Music)

>>Draheim: Dancing on my Knees

is always a fun one to play

and Diamond Disco.

I mean I'm playing disco

in that song, I'm playing like

Eagles country, southern-rock

guitar and I'mplaying soul

music in that tune and rock

guitar. There's a lot going

on.

(Music)

>>Hardaway: What do I want

people to feel as they're

listening to my music? I want

them to feel whatthey need

to feel. I just want them

to get whatever it is that

they need in that moment

in time because like I said,

it's all about making

a difference.

(Music)

>>Hardaway: I wanna see us

right next to the names of all

the great ones, you know, when

you

mention The Temptations, later

on down the line you're going

to mention The

Infatuations.

(Music)

>>FASHION DESIGNER ANDREA GEER

IS FASCINATED WITH PATTERN.

(Music)

>>My name is Andrea Geer. I'm

a clothing designer here

in Rochester, New York.

When I first started, I was

a painter, and at a certain

point I gravitated towards

the clothing. When I painted,

I would make paintings

and hang it on the wall

in my own house. When I was

able to sellthem - which was

hard to do - it would hang

in the wall of the person who

purchased it. What I loveabout

clothing design is that it's

interactive on every level.

The thing that really struck

me about the clothing was

the excitement it can

generate. It can be a powerful

statement but it can make

people feel very beautiful

to have just that perfect

piece of clothing.

People buy clothing

for emotional reasons. It's

particularly personal

because they're wearing it,

and it's expressing something

about their personality.

You're making a statement

about your style. You're

making a statement about how

you want to look and how

you want to appear to others.

You want to tap into those

things that are most important

to people; to highlight ad be

a part of that excitement.

It's never really about need

or function - it's always more

than that.

It's more than just clothing

design to me. It's my art.

It's my passion. So I'm trying

to really create something

unique and I have spent

my whole entire life doing

this. It's not just

in the clothing- I started out

as a painter and I knew when

I was a child that I was going

to be an artist. There's

never, ever been anything else

that I wanted to do.

The craft comes into play

in that you're creating

the fabrics. I'm creating

the fabrics on a machine. I am

having fabrics made

and printed on leather, silk,

and other fabrics. I'm

designing the clothing, I'm

making the clothing. That's

craft. The art part of it

comes with the way that you're

lookingat the materials -

putting things together

in some interesting or new way

where you are trying

to highlight some aspect

of the clothing.

I buy the best materials

and then I do a lot

of experimentation. If I'm

inspired to do things

a certain way, I'm going

to try it. I am a risk taker,

I always have been.

I am most fulfilled when

I have a lot of different raw

materials in front of me.

My relationship with

the materials is tactile. It's

sensual. I want my hands

on the materials.

(Music)

>>I try to combine materials

and techniques in a way that

is really unique. It's

an ongoing challenge.

Because I never get to the end

of that, it keeps me trying

very hard.

I want to surprise people,

and I want them to look

at something I have made

and be really surprised

and delighted.

It's always about

relationships when you're

selling directly

to your customer. People come

back yearafter year -

and they'll come back five

years later and say, 'I bought

this from you five years

agoand I love it. I wear it

all the time, I get

compliments on it.' It makes

them feel good. And you build

upon that relationship

and you're in it for the long

term. It's not a quick

in-and-out.

I am sort of going down

my path, trying to figure out

a way to manufacture my own

clothing that makes sense. It

is at a higher price point

and it is handmade clothing

and it is sort of a niche

market,and it is the fact that

I have to go out and find

my own customer. It's really

more of a lifestyle.I am

on the road. I'm gone much

of the time. On weekends, I am

traveling; I am at a show, I'm

at a convention center.

The thing that you get

from that is you make

face-to-face contact

with your customer who

appreciates the fact that

something is handmade. A lot

of people create clothing

and sell clothing - I'm trying

to create a style.

>>HUGO MEDINA'S MURALS EXPLORE

THE IDEA OF HOME.

>>Art gives the place a soul.

What better than to be walking

down the street and see

artwork insteadof just

the plain beige building.

You know life is better

in color than in black

and white.

My name is Hugo Medina. I was

born in La Paz, Bolivia.

I grew up in New York and I've

been living inPhoenix since

'98.

Fifteen years ago I moved

to Phoenix. I was chasing

my heart.

There was always the stigma

about feelings that had

no culture. Being from New

York when I first moved out

here it was hard to find.

It was always there is just

very hard to find because when

I moved here downtown, we went

downtown after five o'clock

and it was a ghost town. There

was nobody around. Nothing was

open. People were walking

in the streets and people were

afraid to walk in the streets.

And then you have the few

activists few people that

believed in downtown Phoenix,

stayed there and fought

the good fight. It does make

it a destination give it

a place give it a soul.

So artists, usually go where

it's cheap. They go in there.

They start creating art when

they start and then people

will follow the arts

because it gives a destination

of soul. So they would go

downtown to look at themurals.

People used murals

as backdrops for photo shoots

and the more people you have

interacting businesses are

attracted to it because oh,

there's people down there.

We should open a restaurant

andthe restaurant started

opening up and as restaurant

starting opening up and retail

start coming in and people are

like oh we need places

for people to live downtown.

So now we have all these

residences that are popping

up. It's a vital part of any

kind of any downtown or any

neighborhood. The arts brings

people together.

Murals are artwork

for the people by the people.

The murals and public art

takes art back only a select

few are privileged seeing

or can't see it and gives it

to everybody to join and be

a part of.

You can look at my murals

and you can see the similarity

between my moral work

and my canvas work.

Murals you know they are more

community based and they try

to.. I try to bring people

together, which is what makes

me feel special it's almost

like getting everybody coming

in for a cause that's bigger

than ourselves. And we come

in and we leave something

for everybody to experience

and enjoy. The paintings

for me are more of a diary

of how I'm going

through things more personal.

I start with an idea

or concept or even image

and then I don't outline it

I don't draw it on the canvas.

I just pick a spot and start

from the center. Like all life

wall from the center. Ok it

works its way outward

and my paintings do that

I start from a certain

location. I just let it grow

and build. And it changes

as it goes along. And I just

keep building up to it and let

the painting have its own

life.

I wanted to capture

the changing face of Phoenix.

One of my goals was to have

a show at Monorchid, beautiful

gallery downtown and last year

that gave me that opportunity.

The whole series is

questioning what is home.

We have modernization, we have

old buildings, new buildings,

opinions with new Phoenix

and old Phoenix going against

each other. They started

questioning all that in this

series being a part of it,

started evolving with what is

home like some of

the paintings are of buildings

that historic buildings that

were here. They got torn down

at the James Palace Hotel

historic building that's been

part of Phoenix part

of history got torn down

for a parking lot.

So that's one of those

paintings questioning

the evolution of Phoenix

the changing hands. A lot

of the paintings are buildings

that had been here for years.

Way before me. And some are

new places thatare here.

I Have a painting of a little

coffee shop that opened

downtown Phoenix Jobat, where

I go there and everybody knows

my name. Is that home?

Because it's they're all

familiar. So and then

I started a newpainting that

I was born in Bolivia.

So that's my home

or birthplace and combining

Bolivia and Phoenix.

And so it's playing with that

theme. Culture in Phoenix has

grown leaps and bounds in just

the last 10 years. Not even

like we have. Amazing museums

that are finally coming

into light. Before youdidn't

know about it because nobody

came to town.

Art moves people. It motivates

them. It stirs emotion.

So when you bring those

elements into a neighborhood

that doesn't have it it gives

it life.

It's amazing to watch it

happen. The culture evolves

as the city evolves

and we grow. It took us

a while but we found out who

we are now we're creating it.

I love about Phoenix is. It's

happen. The culture evolves

as the city evolves

and we grow. It took us

a while but we found out who

we are now we're creating it.

I love about Phoenix is. It's

almost like an empty canvas.

You know we have all these

young artists and architects

and engineers and

entrepreneurs that come here

and make their own city.

And that's what we created

together.

>>NEXT WEEK ON COLORES,

EXPERIMENTING WITH TEXTURES,

FABRICS, DYEING AND WEAVING,

ALBUQUERQUE FIBER ARTIST BETTY

BUSBY MAKES STUNNING WORKS

OF ART THAT GO BEYOND

TRADITIONAL QUILT MAKING.

>>The branching of trees is

the same as the branching

of vessels in a circulatory

system. It's the same

as a river branching off.

Those repeated patterns

in nature are something

I revisit again and again.

>>SINCE THE 1970S RICHARD

HOGAN HAS BEEN ONE

OF ALBUQUERQUE'S MOST

CELEBRATED PAINTERS. HE SEES

HIS PAINTINGS AS OBJECTS

AND USES LINE AND COLOR

TO BUILD SPATIAL TENSION.

>>In a certain sense my work

is very simple, it's visual

and I want people to look

at it without preconception,

without looking for

a narrative.

>>IN THE EARLY 1900'S,

ALBUQUERQUE BECAME

A DESTINATION AND A SYMBOL

OF HOPE FOR MANY WHO WERE

SUFFERING TUBERCULOSIS.

"HEALTH SEEKERS" CAME SEEKING

A CURE IN THE HIGH DESERT.

>>There was no known cure

at the time. Streptomycin

wasn't discovered until

the 1940's and in

the meantime, climate was

thought to be very

therapeutic, someplace that

was dry, sunny, and a high

altitude where the air was

considered to be pure and New

Mexico had that in abundance.

>>UNTIL NEXT TIME, THANK

YOU FOR WATCHING.

Funding for COLORES was

provided in part by:

The Nellita E. Walker Fund

KNME-TV Endowment Fund

The Great Southwestern Arts &

Education Endowment Fund

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