C.S.I. Shakespeare

FULL EPISODE

C.S.I. Shakespeare

In spring 2012, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI presented the world premiere of a lost 400-year old play by William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, "The History of Cardenio." This half-hour documentary highlights the 20-year effort by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University, Dr. Gary Taylor, to recreate the play.

AIRED: March 21, 2013 | 0:29:54
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

>> Announcer: "CSI: SHAKESPEARE"

IS MADE POSSIBLE BY THE SUPPORT

OF THE IU SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS

AT IUPUI.

A PUBLIC LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE

RIGHT IN THE HEART OF INDIANA

WITH A COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION

IN THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL

>> Orator: "YOUR HUMBLE

PATIENCE, PRAY, GENTLY TO HEAR,

KINDLY TO JUDGE, A SAMPLING OF

THE WORDS WHICH HAVE MADE

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE OUR MOST

>> Hamlet: THE PLAY'S THE THING,

WHEREIN I'LL CATCH THE

CONSCIENCE OF THE KING.

>> Portia: "THE QUALITY OF MERCY

IS NOT STRAINED.

IT DROPPETH AS THE GENTLE RAIN

FROM HEAVEN.

>> Juliet: "A ROSE BY ANY OTHER

NAME WOULD SMELL AS SWEET.

>> Othello: "SHE LOVED ME FOR

THE DANGERS I HAD PASSED AND I

LOVED HER THAT SHE DID PITY

THEM.

>> Gary Taylor: "OH, THAT A MAN

COULD REASON DOWN THIS FEVER OF

THE BLOOD.

'THE HISTORY OF CARDENIO.'

>> Gary Taylor: "IT WAS A PLAY

THAT WE KNOW EXISTED, BUT IT WAS

>> Terri Bourus: "WE DON'T HAVE

THE WHOLE PLAY-WE HAVE ONLY THE

STORY THAT LEWIS THEOBALD GIVES

>> Regina Buccola: "IT'S KIND OF

ANALOGOUS TO AN ART HISTORIAN

WHO HAS A PAINTING AND KNOWS

THAT THERE IS PAINT ON THERE

>> Suzanne Gossett: "TO KIND OF

FIND THE SHAKESPEARE

>> Gerald Baker: "THIS WAS NOT A

RESPECTABLE THING FOR ACADEMICS

>> Lori Leigh: "HE'S TOYING WITH

TEXTS THAT PEOPLE THINK ARE

WRITTEN BY A MAN PEOPLE THINK

>> Professor Stanley Wells: "HE

IS NOT AFRAID OF CONTROVERSY.

HE, IN FACT, HE MIGHT EVEN BE

>> Joe Cacaci: "THAT SOMETHING

COULD BE BURIED FOR ALL THESE

YEARS AND NOW BROUGHT BACK TO

>> Ayanna Thompson: "I THINK

IT'S MARVELOUS."

>> Narrator: THERE IS AN AXIOM

OLDER THAN ICE THAT THOSE THAT

CAN , DO ...

AND THOSE THAT CAN'T ...

PLAGIARIZE.

CASE IN POINT, ONE LEWIS

THEOBALD, CIRCA 1727, A

PLAYWRIGHT WHOSE PORTFOLIO

REDEFINED THE TERM "DRECK."

>> Gary Taylor: "HE DOES NOT

HAVE A LITERARY GIFT."

>> Terri Bourus: "HE WAS NOT A

GOOD PLAYWRIGHT."

>> Gary Taylor: "HE HAS NO

DISCERNABLE SENSE OF HUMOR."

>> Terri Bourus: "HE JUST WASN'T

GOOD AT IT."

>> Gary Taylor: "NOBODY HAS EVER

REVIVED A PLAY BY THEOBALD.

NOBODY IN THEIR RIGHT MIND

WOULD

REVIVE A PLAY BY THEOBALD."

>> Narrator: WHAT MICROSCOPIC

TALENT THEOBALD DID POSSESS WAS

IN HIS DEVOTION TO A FAR, FAR

BETTER SCRIBE-ONE WHOSE SOUND

AND FURY HAD SHUFFLED OFF THIS

MORTAL COIL A CENTURY EARLIER.

>> Gary Taylor: "HE'S A

WONDERFUL EDITOR OF

SHAKESPEARE...

THE FIRST REALLY ACADEMIC,

HISTORICALLY SERIOUS EDITOR OF

SHAKESPEARE.

HE LOVED SHAKESPEARE."

>> Narrator: SO, IF FILCH YOU

MUST, FILCH FROM THE FINEST.

AND IN THAT YEAR OF 1727,

THEOBALD RAISED EYEBROWS WHEN HE

STAGED A PLAY HE WROTE-"DOUBLE

FALSEHOOD"-CALLING IT AN

"ADAPTATION" OF AN ORIGINAL

SHAKESPEARE TOME, A CLAIM THAT

WOULD HAVE RECEIVED MUCH

SKEPTICISM HAD IT NOT BEEN MET

BY DERISION.

>> Terri Bourus: "WAS THEOBALD A

FRAUD?

WAS THAT BASED ON A SHAKESPEARE

MANUSCRIPT OR NOT?"

>> Narrator: NOW WE KNOW THAT

THEOBALD WAS UNDENIABLY TELLING

THE TRUTH.

THE SHAKESPEARE HE RIPPED OFF

WAS CALLED "THE HISTORY OF

CARDENIO."

>> Terri Bourus: "WE KNOW THAT

THE PLAY WAS ENTERED IN THE

STATIONERS' REGISTER, FOR

EXAMPLE.

WE HAVE MANY DOCUMENTS THAT SAY

IT WAS PERFORMED IN THE COURT OF

JAMES."

>> Narrator: ...WHICH IS

SORT OF WEIRD, BECAUSE

IT WAS A RIP-OFF, TOO.

OUR INVESTIGATION SHIFTS TO

SUNNY SPAIN, TO A MAN, AND TO

THE CLOSING CHAPTERS IN WHAT HAS

BEEN AN ODE TO UNHAPPINESS.

>> Steven Wagschal: "HE FIGHTS

IN THE VERY FAMOUS BATTLE OF

LEPANTO, WHERE HE LOST THE USE

OF HIS LEFT HAND.

ON THE WAY BACK, HE WAS

TRAVELING BACK TO SPAIN AND HIS

SHIP THAT HE WAS ON WAS ATTACKED

BY PIRATES.

YOU CAN'T MAKE THIS STUFF UP.

THEN HE SPENT FIVE YEARS OF HIS

LIFE IN AN ALGERIAN PRISON.

HE TORTURED IN THIS TIME, HAS A

HORRIBLE EXPERIENCE.

HE'S RELEASED.

NOW HE'S DISABLED.

HE BECOMES, WHAT WE WOULD CALL

TODAY, A TAX COLLECTOR.

EVENTUALLY, HE'S PUT IN PRISON

IN SPAIN BECAUSE HE'S ACCUSED OF

LARCENY - HE SPENDS ABOUT TWO

YEARS IN PRISON, SO, HE

BASICALLY HAS A VERY MISERABLE

LIFE.

ULTIMATELY, HE WRITES DON

QUIXOTE, PUBLISHES IT, WHICH IS,

OF COURSE, HIS CLAIM TO

FAME-HE'S ABOUT 58 YEARS OLD AT

>> Narrator: AND MIGUEL "NEVER

TOO LATE" DE CERVANTES' TALE OF

QUESTING KLUTZINESS IS AN

INSTANT AND GLOBAL SUCCESS-WHICH

DOES NOT ESCAPE THE NOTICE OF

ENGLAND'S MOST SUCCESSFUL

PLAYWRIGHT, FOR WHILE A

PROFICIENCY IN PENNING

PRETERNATURAL POETRY HE DOTH

POSSESS, THE NEED FOR ORIGINAL

>> Ayanna Thompson: "SHAKESPEARE

IS TOTALLY COMFORTABLE LIFTING

WHOLESALE PLOTS INTO HIS PLAYS.

HE IS NOT AT ALL INTERESTED IN

CREATING ORIGINAL PLOTS.

IT'S JUST NOT WHAT SHAKESPEARE

>> Gary Taylor: "THEY DIDN'T

HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT COPYRIGHT.

YOU COULD TAKE A BRAND NEW

NOVEL, LIKE "DON QUIXOTE," JUST

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH A FEW

MONTHS BEFORE, AND YOU COULD

>> Narrator: YEP, EVEN IF YOU'RE

THE BARD, WHEN YOU'RE OPTING TO

FILCH, FILCH FROM THE FINEST.

AFTER ALL, NO COPYRIGHT, NO

HARM, NO FOUL, RIGHT?

WELL, THE REAL CRIME IS THIS.

"THE HISTORY OF CARDENIO" DID

NOT SURVIVE THE RAVAGES OF

ALL THAT REMAINS IS THEOBALD'S

"DOUBLE FALSEHOOD," A GUMBO OF

CLUNKY RE-WRITES AND

PLAY-SHORTENING DELETIONS, WITH

NARY AN ORIGINAL VERSION OF

>> Police Investigator: "WELL,

IF THERE'S NO LITERATI DELICTI,

>> Narrator: AND AS RECOMPENSE

FOR YOUR TROUBLE, DEAR VIEWER,

WE NOW TURN OUR ATTENTION TO

SOME AUTHENTIC SHAKESPEARE.

>> Cardenio: "REASON PRESSES

PATIENCE."

>> Lucinda: "PATIENCE, WHAT

ELSE?

>> Narrator: WHAT THIS IS ALSO

IS NO PLAY OTHER THAN THE LOST

"HISTORY OF CARDENIO" ITSELF,

CHRISTENING A NEW URBAN THEATRE

IN THE HEART OF INDIANAPOLIS

THAT IS AN EXTRAORDINARY TALE OF

>> Terri Bourus: "VERY PROUD OF

MY ACTORS AND MY STUDENTS WHO

ARE CHANGING THE CLIMATE AT

IUPUI AS WE SPEAK.

THE THEATRE WAS A CEMENT SHELL

WHEN I ARRIVED FIVE YEARS

>> Narrator: SHAKESPEARE ONCE

WROTE, "TIS THE MIND THAT MAKES

THE BODY RICH," AND A LOT OF

GOODLY MINDS AT THE UNIVERSITY

DECIDED TO USE THE SPACE TO

REACH OUT TO OTHER MINDS

STILL ...

THE MISSION?

>> Terri Bourus: "WE WERE ABLE

TO CREATE A THEATRE SPACE FOR

LIVE THEATRE IN THE CAMPUS

CENTER ...

WHICH CAN ALSO BE USED AS A

CINEMA, TO BENEFIT THE CAMPUS

AND TO ALSO BENEFIT

INDIANAPOLIS.

AND YES, WE WERE VERY PROUD TO

OPEN THE CAMPUS CENTER THEATRE

WITH THE 'HISTORY OF

CARDENIO'-AND THAT WAS THE

CHAMPAGNE SMASHED AGAINST THE

>> Bill Blomquist: "FOR US, THIS

IS ALSO A LEGACY.

THE WEBBS AND THE STUDENTS WHO

PUT ON THEATRE HERE AT IUPUI IN

THE '80S AND THE '90S AND DIDN'T

HAVE A FACILITY LIKE THIS HAVE

COME BACK HOME TO WATCH US OPEN

THIS NEW FACILITY AND THIS

>> Narrator: NOW THE WEBBS,

EDGAR AND DOROTHY, KNOW ALL

ABOUT JUMPING INTO THE DEEP END

OF PERFORMANCE.

THAT'S BECAUSE IUPUI'S ORIGINAL

VENUE WAS A BIT OF QUIRKINESS

THAT, WELL, LET'S JUST SAY THAT

THEATRE STARTS WITH "T," AND

THAT RHYMES WITH "P," AND THAT

STOOD FOR:

>> Dorothy Webb: "A SWIMMING

POOL.

IT SWOPED DOWN A LITTLE ...

JUST A LITTLE, SO WHERE THE

AUDIENCE SAT THERE WAS A LITTLE

BIT OF AN INCLINE DOWN.

IT WAS STILL VERY SHALLOW, THE

ONLY THEATRE WE EVER WORKED IN

WHERE, ALBEIT I'M VERY TALL, YOU

DIDN'T NEED A LADDER TO SET THE

WE USED FOLDING CHAIRS,

DIRECTOR'S CHAIRS, AND THESE

WERE FOLDED UP AND PUT AWAY IN

BETWEEN PERFORMANCES.

ONE OF THE INSTRUCTORS THAT HAD

A CLASSROOM NEXT TO THE SCENE

SHOP OFTEN WAS LECTURING AT THE

SAME TIME I WAS TEACHING

STAGECRAFT.

SO, HE AND I WORKED OUT A CODE

AND HE'D LECTURE FOR A WHILE AND

THEN HE WOULD KNOCK ON THE WALL

AND WE WOULD START THE SAWS AND

>> Narrator: FROM SUCH HUMBLE

BEGINNINGS, THE THEATRE PROGRAM

AT IUPUI GREW TO HOST THE

BONDERMAN NATIONAL CHILDREN'S

PLAYWRITING COMPETITION AND

NUMBER AMONG ITS ALUMNI ACTRESS

BUT THEN, AFTER DECADES OF ITS

HOUR ON THE STAGE, IT WAS HEARD

NO MORE.

THE UNIVERSITY NO LONGER OFFERED

A DEGREE IN THEATER.

AND THAT'S WHY THIS PREMIERE,

WHERE THINGS ONCE LOST ARE FOUND

AGAIN, CONTAINS, TO PARODY

THEOBALD, SOME "DOUBLE

>> Dorothy Webb: "IT GAVE ME A

FLICKER OF HOPE THAT THEATRE

MIGHT BE RETURNED TO IUPUI IN A

PROGRAM THAT WOULD ALSO PROVIDE

LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE

>> Narrator: BUT FIRST THINGS

FIRST.

THE PLAY'S THE THING, SO HOW

WAS

"CARDENIO" RECONSTRUCTED?

UNEARTHING THE BARD BENEATH THE

BOGUS IS THE PASSIONATE PURSUIT

>> Gary Taylor: "MOST OF

SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS WERE

ORIGINALLY PERFORMED IN THE

GLOBE THEATRE ON THE SOUTH BANK

OF THE THAMES RIVER IN LONDON.

THE ONE THING EVERYBODY KNOWS

ABOUT 'DON QUIXOTE,' EVEN IF YOU

HAVEN'T READ THE BOOK IS THAT,

AT A CERTAIN POINT, HE GETS ON

HIS HORSE AND HE CHARGES A

WINDMILL BECAUSE HE THINKS THE

WINDMILL IS A GIANT.

BUT IN THE EARLY MODERN THEATRE,

YOU COULDN'T DO THAT.

SO, ONE THING WE KNOW ABOUT THIS

LOST PLAY BASED ON 'DON QUIXOTE'

IS THAT IT DID NOT CONTAIN THE

MOST FAMOUS INCIDENT IN THE

>> Narrator: NO WINDMILLS.

NO PROBLEM.

FOR ALTHOUGH THE DON WAS ALL THE

RAGE AT COURT, IT WAS ALSO THE

CAST OF SECONDARY CHARACTERS,

MOST OF ALL, THE SORELY BESET

UPON CARDENIO, THAT IMPRESSED

SHAKESPEARE AND HIS

COLLABORATOR, A MAN 15 YEARS HIS

JUNIOR WHO, AT ONE TIME, WAS

CONSIDERED TO BE THE SUPERIOR

PLAYWRIGHT OF THE TWO - YES,

SO, WHO WAS JOHN FLETCHER?

WELL, YOU ARE ABOUT TO BE

INTRODUCED TO THE ODDEST BODKINS

OF AN ODD COUPLE THAT EVER

>> Gary Taylor: "SHAKESPEARE IS

A NOBODY FROM NOWHERE.

HE DIDN'T' WANT TO STAY THERE.

HE WANTED TO GET OUT AND HE WAS

LOOKING FOR AND INTERESTED IN

THE HEROES OF THE CLASSICAL

WORLD, THE KINGS AND QUEENS OF

ENGLAND.

AND HE WAS CONSISTENTLY

DISTURBED BY FAILING TO KEEP

FAITH WITH THE PAST.

THIS MAKES HIM A SOMEWHAT

FLETCHER WAS THE SON OF THE

BISHOP OF LONDON.

HE IS A VERY FLAMBOYANT

CHARACTER.

HE DIED RELATIVELY YOUNG.

THE STORY ABOUT WHY HE DIED IS

THAT THE PLAGUE WAS RAGING IN

LONDON AND THE SAFEST THING TO

DO WAS TO GET OUT OF LONDON AS

QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE, BUT

FLETCHER STAYED FOR ONE MORE DAY

BECAUSE HE WAS WAITING FOR A

SPECIALLY TAILORED SUIT TO BE

FINISHED AND HE STAYED ANOTHER

DAY AND HE CAUGHT THE PLAGUE AND

AND WHAT THEY HAD IN COMMON WAS

THAT THEY WERE BOTH INTERESTED

IN A NEW GENRE OF PLAY - A

RELATIVELY NEW

GENRE - TRAGI-COMEDY.

AND THAT'S ACTUALLY PART OF THE

STORY IN 'DON QUIXOTE' OF THE

CHARACTER CARDENIO.

IT'S A STORY THAT MIXES A LOT OF

EMOTIONAL GRIEF AND ANGUISH AND

NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCES WITH

SO, THEY SEEM TO HAVE EACH

RECOGNIZED THAT THERE WERE

ELEMENTS IN THIS STORY THAT

FLETCHER WOULD BE PARTICULARLY

GOOD AT AND OTHER ELEMENTS IN

THE STORY THAT SHAKESPEARE WOULD

BE PARTICULARLY GOOD AT.

AND THAT'S FORTUNATE FOR US

BECAUSE IT MAKES IT EASIER FOR

US, THE LARGER THE CHUNKS ARE,

IT MAKES IT EASIER FOR US TO

ONE OF THE THINGS THAT

FLETCHER DID REALLY WELL IS HE

WAS A MASTER OF PACE.

HIS PLAYS MOVE VERY FAST.

WHEN YOU THINK OF A SHAKESPEARE

PLAY, YOU DON'T THINK OF IT

SHAKESPEARE IS A GREAT MASTER OF

METAPHOR.

SO THAT WHEN YOU COME OUT OF

THAT THEATRE, YOU FEEL LIKE YOUR

HEAD IS EXPLODING WITH ALL THE

DIFFERENT IDEAS AND FEELINGS

THAT HAVE BEEN PACKED INTO THAT

VERY BRIEF TIME.

PERSONAL BETRAYAL, IS A MAJOR

THEME IN HIS WORK AND A MAJOR

THEME IN 'CARDENIO' AS WELL AND

I THINK ONE OF THE THINGS THAT

WOULD HAVE DRAWN HIM TO THE

STORY THAT CERVANTES TELLS IN

'DON QUIXOTE' IS THAT IT'S A

FLETCHER, IN PARTICULAR, WOULD

HAVE BEEN INTERESTED IN 'DON

QUIXOTE' BECAUSE FLETCHER,

THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE, HAD AN

ENORMOUS INTEREST IN SPANISH

LITERATURE.

HE'S ALSO A MASTER OF A CERTAIN

KIND OF PATHOS.

WOMEN WHO HAVE BEEN ABANDONED

ARE ONE OF HIS GREAT THEMES,

AND, OF COURSE, THERE IS AN

ABANDONED WOMAN IN THIS PLAY AND

MOST OF HER SCENES ARE WRITTEN

BY FLETCHER, THERE'S NO QUESTION

YOU GET THIS SORT OF

COLLABORATION OFTEN WHEN YOU

THINK THAT THE TWO PEOPLE DON'T

FIT VERY WELL TOGETHER.

SO, IF YOU TAKE A SONG AND YOU

COMBINE DIDO AND EMINEM, PART OF

THE SUCCESS OF THAT IS PRECISELY

THAT THEY'RE VERY DIFFERENT

STYLES.

SO THAT THE RESULT IS SOMETHING

BETTER THAN EITHER OF THEM WOULD

>> Professor Stanley Wells: "HE

LIKES NOT TO ACCEPT RECEIVED

OPINION WITHOUT SERIOUSLY

QUESTIONING IT AND THAT'S A VERY

GOOD VIRTUE-A VERY GREAT VIRTUE

>> Narrator: PROFESSOR STANLEY

WELLS REMEMBERS THE FIRST TIME

GARY'S AND 'CARDENIO'S' STARS

FIRST ALIGNED.

THESE DAYS, GARY IS A

DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH PROFESSOR

AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY.

THAT'S JUST PART OF A WINDING

ROAD THAT TOOK THIS KANSAS

SCHOOLBOY TO THE PINNACLE OF

SHAKESPEAREAN RESEARCH WHEN

PROFESSOR WELLS VAULTED OVER A

STACK OF MORE ACCOMPLISHED

APPLICATIONS TO CALL A

FRESH-OUT-OF-GRADUATE-SCHOOL

GARY TO BE HIS ASSISTANT EDITOR

ON THE PRESTIGIOUS OXFORD

UNIVERSITY PRESS EDITION OF

SHAKESPEARE, ALL BECAUSE OF A

BARD-BASED ESSAY CONTEST THAT

GARY ENTERED AND THAT PROFESSOR

>> Gary Taylor: "IT WAS LIKE

WINNING THE LOTTERY WITHOUT

>> Narrator: SEVEN YEARS LATER,

THEIR TOUCHSTONE COLLABORATION

EMERGED AND, JUST LIKE THE

VETERAN SHAKESPEARE AND

PRECOCIOUS NEWBIE FLETCHER

BEFORE THEM, THIS WRITING DUO

>> Gary Taylor: "RESEARCH IS

ALWAYS A DIALOGUE AND YOU CAN

ONLY PARTICIPATE IN THAT

DIALOGUE IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING

NEW TO SAY.

AND PART OF WHAT YOU MAY HAVE

NEW TO SAY IS THAT THE OLD

>> Professor Stanley Wells: "THE

FACT THAT HE'S SO WILLING TO

QUESTION RECEIVED OPINION MEANS,

AT THE SAME TIME, THAT HE PUTS

PEOPLE'S BACKS UP SOMETIMES.

HE IS NOT AFRAID OF CONTROVERSY.

HE, IN FACT, MIGHT EVEN BE SAID

>> Narrator: TUCKED INSIDE THE

OXFORD SHAKESPEARE WAS BUT THE

BRIEFEST OF NODS TO THE LOST

PLAY.

BUT A SEED HAD BEEN PLANTED.

TWENTY YEARS AGO, GARY SET OUT

TO HYPOTHESIZE WHAT SHAKESPEARE

AND FLETCHER'S LOST SHEEP MIGHT

>> Professor Stanley Wells:

"VERY TYPICALLY OF HIM, HE TRIED

TO RECONSTRUCT THE PLAY, A LOST

PLAY, ON THE BASIS OF

>> Narrator: NOW, GARY'S EFFORTS

TO UNEARTH THE VERY ANCIENT HAVE

BEEN SPED UP EXPONENTIALLY BY

>> Gary Taylor: "WE HAVE TO GO

THROUGH LINE-BY-LINE, SEEING IF

WE CAN FIND EVIDENCE OF THEOBALD

INTERFERING WITH THE ORIGINAL

PLAY.

NOW, THIS SORT OF PROBLEM WAS

INSOLUBLE UNTIL VERY RECENTLY,

BECAUSE THE ONLY WAY THAT YOU

CAN SOLVE THIS PROBLEM, WHERE

YOU'RE HAVING TO DO THIS KIND OF

MICROANALYSIS, IS BY HAVING VERY

WE CAN BEGIN WITH A SPEECH NEAR

THE END OF PLAY, IN THE FINAL

SCENE OF THE PLAY, AND SCHOLARS

HAVE ARGUED THAT THIS FINAL

SCENE IS MOSTLY WRITTEN BY JOHN

FLETCHER IN THE EARLY 17TH

CENTURY BUT THAT IT HAS BEEN

MESSED WITH BY LEWIS THEOBALD IN

>> Leonora: "THE RIGHTEOUS

POWER'S, AT LENGTH, HAVE CROWNED

>> Gary Taylor: "WHAT I'VE DONE

HERE IS I'VE COMPARED EVERYTHING

IN THE SPEECH, EVERY WORD, EVERY

PHRASE, EVERY IMAGE TO ALL OF

THE WORKS OF FLETCHER AND TO ALL

AND, IF THERE'S A PARALLEL TO

SOMETHING FROM FLETCHER, I'VE

PUT IT IN GREEN.

AND IF THERE'S A PARALLEL TO

SOMETHING IN THEOBALD, BUT NOT

FLETCHER, I'VE PUT IT IN ORANGE.

SO, YOU CAN IMMEDIATELY SEE THAT

ALMOST EVERYTHING IN THIS SPEECH

HAS PARALLELS TO THEOBALD, BUT

NOT FLETCHER.

SO, WE CAN JUST TAKE THIS WHOLE

BUT WE CAN NOW ALSO LOOK AT

>> Lucinda: "FOR SUCH SAD RITES

>> Gary Taylor: "SO, IF WE PULL

THAT SPEECH UP, YOU SEE I'VE

DONE EXACTLY THE SAME THING AS

WITH THE OTHER SPEECH.

ELEMENTS OF THE SPEECH THAT ARE

PARALLELED IN THE WORKS OF

THEOBALD ARE IN ORANGE; ELEMENTS

OF THE SPEECH THAT ARE

PARALLELED TO THE WORKS OF

FLETCHER ARE GREEN.

BUT THERE'S NO ORANGE...

IT'S ALL GREEN.

THERE'S NOTHING HERE THAT

SUGGESTS THE HAND OF LEWIS

THEOBALD OR ANYTHING FROM THE

18TH CENTURY.

SO, THIS PASSAGE SEEMS TO BE

PART OF THE ORIGINAL PLAY,

WRITTEN BY JOHN FLETCHER, SO

LET'S KEEP IT AND LET'S LOOK AT

>> Cardenio: "NO IMPEDIMENT

>> Gary Taylor: "THIS TIME, I'VE

COMPARED EVERYTHING IN THE

SPEECH TO, AGAIN, THE WORKS OF

THEOBALD, BUT ALSO TO THE WORKS

OF SHAKESPEARE.

ANYTHING BY SHAKESPEARE IS IN

ROYAL PURPLE.

THE WHOLE PASSAGE SEEMS TO BE

EVEN IF YOU DON'T KNOW ANYTHING

ABOUT EARLY MODERN POETRY OR

DRAMA, YOU CAN IMMEDIATELY SEE

THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT

UNFORTUNATELY, DATABASES CAN'T

SOLVE ALL OF OUR PROBLEMS.

THEOBALD GETS RID OF ENTIRE

SCENES AND ENTIRE CHARACTERS IN

HIS OTHER ADAPTATIONS.

BUT YOU CAN'T PERFORM A

COLLECTION OF FRAGMENTS IN A

THEATRE.

I HAVE TO ENGAGE IN A DIFFERENT

KIND OF RESEARCH THAT INVOLVES

ME WRITING SPEECHES IN THE STYLE

OF FLETCHER AND IN THE STYLE OF

>> Joyce Boro: "WHAT GARY HAS

DONE IS AMAZING.

I MEAN, YOU COULD HAND ME, YOU

KNOW, A LIST OF 5,000 WORDS AND

EXPRESSIONS, I COULDN'T WRITE A

>> Lori Leigh: "IT'S A BOLD

STATEMENT TO CLAIM THAT 'DOUBLE

FALSEHOOD' IS OR COULD BE

'CARDENIO,' AND THEN TO TRY TO

ESSENTIALLY UNADAPT IT.

HE'S TOYING WITH TEXTS THAT

PEOPLE THINK ARE WRITTEN BY A

MAN THAT PEOPLE THINK YOU CAN'T

>> Terri Bourus: "WE'VE GOT TO

BLOCK THAT AND GET IT ON AND

>> Narrator: WHICH BRINGS US TO

THE PART WHERE OUR LITERATI

DELICTI BECOMES A CORPUS

PERFORMDUM.

>> Narrator: DR. TERRI BOURUS

CAME TO IUPUI'S SCHOOL OF

LIBERAL ARTS CHARGED WITH

CREATING PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN

THEATRE AND THE COMMUNITY.

WITH NO PERFORMANCE SPACE BUT

MANY COLLABORATORS, SHE TURNED

TO THE UNORTHODOX, ONCE STAGING

THE COURTROOM SCENE FROM THE

"MERCHANT OF VENICE' IN MOOT

NOW, IT'S BEEN 26 YEARS SINCE

THAT OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

EDITION OF SHAKESPEARE.

TIME FOR GARY TO UPDATE FOR THE

>> Terri Bourus: "THEY WANTED A

THIRD GENERAL EDITOR AND THEY

WANTED A WOMAN AND THEY WANTED A

SCHOLAR WHO WAS WELL-VERSED IN

>> Narrator: AND THAT'S WHEN

>> Terri Bourus: "I ACTUALLY

THOUGHT HE WAS VERY OLD.

>> Narrator: AS PART OF THEIR

WORK ON THE NEW OXFORD

SHAKESPEARE PROJECT, TERRI

CREATED HOOSIER BARD PRODUCTIONS

SO THAT THE TEAM COULD TEST

EDITORIAL DECISIONS UNDER THE

MICROSCOPE OF ACTUAL

AND SHE CAUGHT THE "CARDENIO"

BUG, TRAVELING AS FAR AS NEW

ZEALAND TO SEE VARIOUS

"IN-PROGRESS" READINGS AND

STUDENT PERFORMANCES.

AND SHE MADE A PROMISE TO

HERSELF, FOR WHILE "CARDENIO"

HAD HAD READINGS WITH ACTORS

SUCH AS RICHARD DREYFUSS AND

WHOOPI GOLDBERG, IT HAD NEVER

BEEN STAGED AS A FULL-SCALE

PRODUCTION USING PROFESSIONAL

>> Terri Bourus: "SO, I HAD THE

>> Cardenio: "THE HISTORY OF...

>> Narrator: AT ITS CORE, "THE

HISTORY OF CARDENIO" IS ABOUT,

WELL, CARDENIO, A MAN WHO LOSES

HIS LOVE TO HIS BEST FRIEND,

GOES KING LEAR-INGLY MAD, AND

THEN GETS REUNITED WITH HIS LOST

LOVE.

IT ALSO CONTAINS A HOST OF

>> Ayanna Thompson: "IT'S THE

TRIFECTA - RACE, CLASS AND

>> Regina Buccola: "THESE KINDS

OF ISSUES CONTINUE TO BE

RELEVANT TO US AND SO THEREFORE

THE PLAYS THAT CONTAIN THOSE

ISSUES CONTINUE TO BE RELEVANT

>> Narrator: AND THIS NIGHT, AS

"CARDENIO'S" CAST OF BOTH PROS

AND IUPUI STUDENT ACTORS BEGINS

ITS WEB TO WEAVE BEFORE A

PREMIERE AUDIENCE THAT INCLUDES

SCHOLARS FROM AROUND THE WORLD,

IT SOON BECOME OBVIOUS THAT THE

FEEDBACK ON THIS SHOW'S GONNA

>> Steven Wagschal: "SANCHO IS

AN INTERESTING CASTING DECISION.

AND NOT JUST CASTING, BUT HIS

DESCRIPTION IN THE PLAY.

HE'S A YOUNG MAN IN THE PLAY.

IN THE NOVEL, SANCHO IS A

40-SOMETHING YEAR-OLD MAN WITH

>> Terri Bourus: "THAT DIDN'T

WORK IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND.

THEY WOULD HAVE RECOGNIZED AN

OLDER MAN TUTORING OR BRINGING

ALONG WITH HIM AN APPRENTICE.

SANCHO MAKES MUCH MORE SENSE TO

>> Quixot: "THERE ARE AS MANY

>> Terri Bourus: "BOTH OF THESE

ACTORS ARE BLACK.

AND SO, I NEVER HESITATED TO

CAST THEM, BUT I WAS QUESTIONED

>> Quixot: "YOU MAY, BY

DEPUTATION, AS OTHER GREAT

CONQUISTADORS HAVE DONE, SELL

YOUR BLACK SUBJECTS INTO

>> Terri Bourus: "AN AFRICAN

AMERICAN MIGHT NOT WANT TO SPEAK

LINES ABOUT SLAVERY AND BEING

BOUGHT AND SOLD AND OWNING OTHER

PEOPLE AND THERE ARE LINES IN

THE PLAY THAT REFER TO THAT AND

THEY'RE FUNNY LINES ...

>> Cardenio: "ARE YOU A PYGMY OR

>> Steven Wagschal: "TO ME, AS A

SCHOLAR OF CERVANTES, I'M NOT

THRILLED WITH THE WAY IT

PORTRAYS DON QUIXOTE AND SANCHO

THEMSELVES BECAUSE 'DON

QUIXOTE,' AS MANY CENTURIES OF

READERS HAVE COME TO COME TO

>> Suzanne Gossett: "ONE OF THE

BIGGEST QUESTIONS IS THE DON

QUIXOTE PART WHICH IS, OF

COURSE, ENTIRELY WRITTEN BY

TAYLOR BECAUSE IT DOESN'T EXIST

IN 'DOUBLE FALSEHOOD.'

ON THE ONE HAND.

BOTH SHAKESPEARE AND FLETCHER

WERE EXTREMELY LIKELY TO HAVE A

SUBPLOT.

GARY'S TAKEN THE PLOT FROM THE

CERVANTES' NOVEL, OF COURSE, BUT

TO PUT THOSE TWO TOGETHER,

>> Violenta: "'TIS A HARD WORLD

>> Narrator: BUT THE MOST

CONTROVERSIAL ASPECT OF "THE

HISTORY OF CARDENIO" MAY REST

WITH THE MIXED-RACE CHARACTER,

>> Fernando: "YOUR LORD, INDEED,

>> Terri Bourus: "SHE IS COERCED

INTO SEX.

VIOLENTA IS PUT UPON TWO TIMES.

AND I HAD TO SPEND TIME TALKING

TO HER AND WORKING WITH HER

BECAUSE SHE KNEW THAT, IN THE

CONTEXT OF THE PLAY, THAT THIS

WOULD FUNCTION LIKE THE BEST

THEATRE SHOULD ALWAYS FUNCTION.

IT SHOULD MAKE YOU A LITTLE

SQUIRMY.

BUT STILL, VIOLENCE IS THERE AND

SO, AFTER THE SCENE, I WOULD

HAVE TO SAY, 'HOW ARE YOU GUYS

DOING?'

AND THEY'D SAY, 'WE'RE OK ...

>> Ayanna Thompson: "TO ASK AN

AFRICAN-AMERICAN ACTRESS TO PLAY

A CHARACTER WHO IS REPEATED

SEXUALLY VIOLATED THROUGHOUT THE

PLAY BY MEN AND THEN TO HAVE HER

BE WITH THAT INITIAL WHITE MAN

>> Fernando: "THOUGH CLAY MORE

BROWNER, NO OTHER WOULD I

>> Ayanna Thompson: "I'M NOT

SURE THAT I TOTALLY AM CONVINCED

THAT THAT IS A SHAKESPEAREAN

>> Joyce Boro: "IT'S DISTURBING

FOR US AS A MODERN AUDIENCE.

I THINK IT'S AN ENDING THAT'S

VERY PLAUSIBLE FOR THE PLAY; I

THINK IT'S AN AUTHENTIC ENDING.

THERE'S SOMETHING OF THAT IN THE

ENDING OF 'MEASURE FOR MEASURE.'

I THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE, YOU

KNOW, AT THE TIME, YOU KNOW,

WATCHING IT IN THE EARLY 17TH

CENTURY, WOULD HAVE FELT A SENSE

OF RELIEF AND THOUGHT, 'YES,

FINALLY!

>> Narrator: IT IS ONE OF THE

BENEFITS OF 400 YEARS OF

HUMANITY THAT TIMELESSLY

DIFFICULT THEMES TODAY HAVE

ENDINGS THAT HAVE HUMANELY

CHANGED WITH OUR TIMES.

BUT ONE THING THAT IS CONSTANT

AS THE NORTHERN STAR ABOUT

THEATRE IN EVERY AGE IS THE

CAMARADERIE ONLY THOSE BEHIND

>> Terri Bourus: "WE GOT A REAL

COFFIN FROM ABBY MONASTERIES AND

IT SORT OF CREEPED THE ACTORS

OUT WHO HAD TO GET IN THE

COFFIN, AND THEY DIDN'T LIKE TO

BE IN THE COFFIN WITH IT SHUT.

SO, WE FOUND LITTLE WAYS TO PROP

IT OPEN WITH GUM, BUBBLE GUM, SO

THEY WOULDN'T FEEL LIKE THEY

WERE IN A COFFIN.

BUT THEN ONE DAY, I WENT BACK

AND I COULDN'T FIND ONE OF OUR

ACTORS, AND IT TURNED OUT THAT

HE WAS IN THE COFFIN, TAKING A

NAP.

SO, THEY DID GET USED TO THE

>> Quixot: "IF YOU MAGICIANS

>> Narrator: AND SO, WE BRING

THE CURTAIN DOWN.

WHAT'S TO BE MADE OF "THE

HISTORY OF CARDENIO," AND OF THE

NEW VENUE THAT HOUSED ITS MOST

>> Terri Bourus: "IUPUI STANDS

IN A VERY, VERY UNIQUE AND

EXCITING POSITION RIGHT NOW.

THE STUDENT BODY IS GROWING

EVERY YEAR; NEW DEPARTMENTS AND

NEW SCHOOLS BEING BUILT.

IT'S TIME NOW TO HAVE A THEATRE

DEPARTMENT IN AN URBAN CAMPUS,

RIGHT NEXT TO A VERY EXCITING

>> Dorothy Webb: "I JUST HOPE

THAT IT KEEPS GROWING.

I HOPE THAT MORE AND MORE OF THE

STUDENTS CAN GET INVOLVED.

>> Gary Taylor: "IT'S BEEN A

LONG, BUT ALSO INTELLECTUALLY

AND CREATIVELY EXCITING PROCESS.

THE WHOLE IDEA OF THEATRE AS A

FORM OF RESEARCH IS TO

EXPERIMENT.

>> Ayanna Thompson: "I

FUNDAMENTALLY AGREE WITH GARY

THAT THEATRE SHOULD BE A PLACE

OF EXPERIMENTATION, THAT WE

LEARN NEW THINGS THROUGH

THEATRE.

AND I THINK THAT'S WHAT HE'S

>> Steven Wagschal: "I THINK, IN

MANY WAYS, HE MAY NOT RECOGNIZE

THIS, I THINK HIS OWN ENDEAVOR

IS QUITE QUIXOTIC, TO SPEND SO

MUCH TIME DOING SOMETHING THAT

>> Lori Leigh: "WE'RE STILL

WANTING TO SEE 'WHAT IF.'

WE'RE STILL WANTING TO ASK THE

QUESTION, 'WHAT IF SHAKESPEARE

WROTE THIS PLAY, 'CARDENIO,' AND

IF HE DID, WHAT WOULD IT LOOK

>> Joe Cacaci: "UPSTAIRS IN THIS

BUILDING, THERE IS ONE OF MANY

CONVERSATIONS AND DISCUSSIONS

THAT ARE GOING ON ALL WEEKEND

ABOUT THE VERY TOPIC OF THIS

PLAY AND I THINK THE CULMINATION

IN ITS FULL PRODUCTION IS REALLY

GREAT.

>> Chris Marino: "AND IF YOU CAN

BRING THIS TO AN AUDIENCE, I

THINK, 'WHY NOT?'

YOU KNOW, I THINK INDIANAPOLIS

COULD REALLY USE SOMETHING LIKE

THIS.

IT'S REALLY EXTRAORDINARY TO

TAKE THIS ON AND I THINK GUTSY

>> Terri Bourus: "IT'S A VERY

HOT TOPIC.

IT'S ALSO A MYSTERY THAT IS ONLY

SOLVED THROUGH BRUSHING AWAY

YEARS OF MISUNDERSTANDING WHAT

THIS PLAY IS, WHAT THIS PLAY

WAS, WHAT THIS PLAY REPRESENTED,

>> Gerald Baker: "I LOOK

FORWARD, ONE DAY, TO GARY

ACTUALLY GETTING TO GETTING TO

THE POINT WHERE HE CAN SAY,

'THIS IS IT.

THIS IS AS ACCURATE AND AS GOOD

AS I CAN MAKE IT.'

I CAME OUT OF IT THINKING THIS

PLAY, AT SOME POINT, TOUCHES

>> Narrator: AND TO CLOSE: IF

THE PAST HALF-HOUR HAS NOT MADE

YOU A BELIEVER IN THE KARMIC

LINK BETWEEN THE LOST PLAY'S

LITERARY GIANTS, SHAKESPEARE AND

CERVANTES, KNOW THIS.

HISTORIANS BELIEVE BOTH MEN DIED

ON THE SAME DATE IN 1616.

>> Announcer: "CSI: SHAKESPEARE"

WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY THE SUPPORT

OF THE IU SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS

AT IUPUI.

A PUBLIC LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE

RIGHT IN THE HEART OF INDIANA

WITH A COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION

IN THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL

STREAM C.S.I. SHAKESPEARE ON

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