Broadway Sandwich

S1 E1 | FULL EPISODE

“Kinky Boots” and “Hamilton”

Follow Broadway's biggest stars during their break between matinee and evening performances. Join Kyle Post of “Kinky Boots” and host Garen Scribner on a bike ride. Listen in on a singing lesson with “Hamilton’s” Tanairi Sade Vazquez. Go behind the scenes of Broadway’s biggest theaters as actors get ready for the curtain to rise.

AIRED: January 30, 2019 | 0:26:46
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TRANSCRIPT

♪♪

Welcome to "Broadway Sandwich."

We're hanging out with your favorite Broadway performers

to find out what they do on their few short hours

sandwiched between their matinee and evening performances.

Join me as we find out what makes up the meat

in this Broadway sandwich.

We're at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre,

home of the Tony Award-winning best musical

"Kinky Boots."

What'd you think of the show? What'd you think of Kinky Boots?

-Loved it. -Yeah?

-It's wonderful. -Isn't it beautiful?

-It's amazing. -It's humanity.

It's what we need right now.

♪ Everybody ♪

♪ Everybody ♪

♪ Everybody say yeah ♪

"Kinky Boots" tells the story of Charlie,

a straight-laced guy who inherits

his father's failing shoe business.

He forges an unlikely partnership with Lola,

a drag queen, who convinces him to produce stilettos

for drag queens to help save the business.

♪ Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah ♪

♪ Say yeah ♪

♪ Say yeah ♪

♪ Say yeah ♪

♪ Say yeah ♪

"Kinky Boots" has been running here since 2013.

That's over 2,000 performances.

What do you think they get up to in between shows?

What would you do if you had to do another show?

Go to sleep.

Today we're hanging out with Kyle Post.

Kyle plays Witty Bantour, one of Lola's angels.

Kyle is no stranger to Broadway.

He's been seen before in "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark"

as well as "Rent," his first job in New York.

Oh, my...

-Bow down. -...God.

-Yes. -You are amazing.

-Thank you, love. -All right.

So we just have a little break before you have to go back there

and do your second show. -First show is done.

Now, what I like to do between shows,

like, for the amount of energy it takes me to do that show,

I need, like, equal and opposite energy,

so I thought maybe we would take our bikes along the Hudson.

So we're riding up the Hudson River Parkway,

one of the best bike paths in the city.

It's a nice, like, soothing, easy ride home, and pretty.

Absolutely.

When you auditioned for Kinky Boots,

what was that audition like?

Oh, honey.

It said, "Must be a true triple threat -- singer, actor, dancer.

If you think you're Beyoncé, you're close.

This ain't a job for no wallflowers."

That's actually what it said?

That's the description for the role.

So I went in, and I sang Carrie Underwood,

"Before He Cheats," like, a little lower

than what Carrie Underwood herself sings it.

Jerry Mitchell was like, "Can you do it higher?"

Like, "I'm gonna crack," and he's like, "I don't care."

I said, "Okay, hit it."

And I totally cracked, and I said, "Ooh, girl.

I sound like Harvey Fierstein,"

to Harvey Fierstein who was sitting in the room,

and I thought, "I'm either gonna book this job

or I'm never gonna work in this town again."

After the singers call, they brought me in

for the dance call. -Yeah.

Now, I was told that it was a movers call,

which means, like, step touch, step touch,

and I can do this.

It was the danciest of dancers on Broadway.

First bit was easy, and then it got into a double pirouette,

which I can't do, into a cartwheel,

which I can't do, into the splits,

which I can't do,

and it continued on the ground from there.

I was like, "I'm gonna look stupid.

I'm gonna look really dumb,

so I'm just gonna grab my bag and I'm gonna go."

But I was like, "You know what? No.

I got more gumption in me than that. I'm not leaving."

So I put a piece of gum in my mouth

and I started chomping the gum and they called me up,

and it's me, a guy here, a guy here,

and Jerry Mitchell watching, Harvey Fierstein watching.

When we got into the choreography I couldn't do,

the cartwheel and the, you know, pirouette into the splits,

instead of doing it, I took the piece of gum out of my mouth

and I twisted it around my finger and I went, "Work!"

And I watched the other two boys do it

while I stood there chomping my gum,

and guess who booked the show?

It was me.

♪♪

I brought you to the PlantShed Cafe

because it's one of my favorite places on the Upper West Side,

maybe Manhattan in general,

because it's full of beautiful plants.

So what I like to do sometimes between shows

is either hang out in the garden or actually garden.

-Yeah. -It, like, calms me down

and, like, it's sort of like a reboot.

-I like this. -Refresh.

I mean, the oxygen alone that these plants

are creating already feel better.

Exactly. It's good for you.

Deep breath.

I mean, you can't go wrong with an orchid.

Yep. Although I'm...

But that's an elevated, you know what I mean?

...pretty talented at killing those, too.

You really do know a lot about plants.

I mean, you grew up on a farm. -I grew up on a farm,

so I had to grow up in the middle of nowhere.

So this comes naturally to you.

In Michigan, and my mom, like, taught me how to garden

when I was a wee, young, little boy.

-Okay. -But look at these.

Look how pretty this is.

-What's this one called? -Prayer plant.

-A prayer plant. -Can this be outside?

Can this be outside? -Yeah, of course.

Pray that I get through my second show.

We'll take it.

Thank you, PlantShed.

Thank you, PlantShed, loving you.

Okay, so when you're not in the show,

and when you're not gardening, you have another job.

-I do. -How?

-Isn't that funny? -How is that possible?

I know. It's funny.

So tell us about it. What is it?

So I'm a life coach, actually.

I went to school and I got trained in life coaching,

and I help people figure out how to, like,

be the biggest, best, most amazing version of themselves.

That's how I feel about you being a life coach. Ding, ding.

And doing the things that help other people.

So they can get the things that they want.

But in fact, you actually are probably also

life coaching people while you're singing...

-They don't even know. -...about high heels.

In full-beat drag.

Well, listen, when we were at the stage door,

people were telling us that they were affected.

They never cried so much in the theater,

and they felt like this is what theater should really be

about and teaching, you know, about acceptance and love,

and being different is not just okay, but better.

And that's why, like, I love "Kinky Boots"

'cause that's the message, right?

The message is, like, be yourself.

Don't let anyone tell you who you should be,

like, you get to say who you are.

This apartment you've been in for two years now.

Has a backyard, which is amazing,

but very rare in New York.

So rare. We lucked out.

Was it already, like, filled with plants and, like,

an oasis when you got there? -Oh, honey.

It was a barren wasteland of nothing.

-What? -Oh, yeah, no.

Sounds like my dating life.

[ Laughs ]

What?

Post: Welcome.

So cute in here.

To our humble abode, the Upper West Side.

Here are some things you need to know

about a New York City apartment.

You got to make sacrifices.

-Yeah. -So we got a tiny kitchen.

-Uh-huh. -We got a tiny bathroom.

We got a tiny bedroom, but a large living room...

All I see is an oasis of a backyard.

...and green space. That's right.

Wow, wow.

You hear that? You hear that?

Birds chirping.

You know the one thing I thought missing, though, is maybe...

-A prayer plant? -...a prayer plant.

Like, there? Oh, that's actually really good.

-That's nice. -That's nice.

Do you want to do the honors?

Okay, so dig a hole. -Like this?

Now, make sure you don't get these guys here.

-All right. -Dig a nice, big -- yeah.

Mm-hmm. -Oh!

-Look, there's a worm! -A wormy!

That's a sign of a good garden right there.

Oh, my God.

-Hi, friend. -You did grow up on a farm.

You're a friend. We love you.

And then I'ma let you do the honors of watering it.

Ooh.

Now, did you water yourself yet?

You need to stay hydrated for your second show.

I do. I probably need some more coffee,

to be honest, stay fully hydrated, maybe a little snack.

Maybe we can have a snack. -Yeah, that sounds good.

[ Dog barking ]

My apple.

Right after the show, I need something little,

like a apple or something, and then right before the show,

I'm talking, like, five minutes before places, I have a meal...

-Mm-hmm. -...because I have found that

if I don't have, like, a full meal,

I will almost pass out in the finale.

A couple times, that's happened.

I've almost passed out in the finale

in a 2 1/2-foot tall hat and 6-inch heels...

-Dangerous. -...in full-beat drag.

No one wants to see a passing out drag queen.

-Okay, so it's 6:45. -Yeah.

-We have to go. -Got to.

Do you think we have time to see the theater real quick

before you do your second show?

Yeah. Let's do it.

-If we go, like, right now? -Let's do it.

Okay, boom. Let's do it.

You've got to put on your oxygen mask at this point

because we're, like, four and a half flights up.

Knock, knock.

Kimmy. This is our lovely dresser, Kimmy.

So, there's six angels in the show and two swings.

This is where we transform eight times a week

from beautiful men into gorgeous women.

So how did you learn to do the makeup

and wear the heels and do all that?

So, the first time I put myself in makeup,

I gave myself, like, an hour and a half.

I can do it now in 10 minutes.

Now it's like this.

[ Laughs ]

Everything has its own little place.

You know, foundation and all the different brushes.

It's weird, like, after five years, like,

I have a place for everything, right?

So I'm like, "Okay, the foundation always goes here.

The cover always goes here," you know.

It's not like I really want to put them on, but...

What, these old things?

Yeah. I don't -- Okay.

Just one, just really quick, just really quick.

All right, Kyle. I hope they're my size.

-These are... -Oh, my God.

-...the kinky boots. -I'm so scared.

And it's not like I want to do this...

Sure. Oh, wow.

-...but I will if I have to. -She's greedy.

Uh-huh.

What did you call yourself when you first started doing this?

-Newborn baby giraffe. -Okay.

Let me try that. -Yeah.

Let's take a couple steps, see if I can --

Can I get a beat, Kyle?

♪ Ding, ding, ding, dah, dah, dah ♪

♪ Ding, ding, ga-ding, dah, dah, dah ♪

You know, I think I'm getting it.

♪ Ding ga-ding dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah ♪

♪ Dah, dah, dah, dah ♪ -♪ Ding ding ♪

♪ Dah, dah, dah, dah, dee, dee ♪

Now show me face and show me face.

Don't forget the face.

That's what sells the boots, the face.

That wasn't fun for me at all.

Oh, yeah. I know. It looked very difficult for you.

For the sake of journalism.

Now the trek down.

I come up and down these stairs three times per show.

Everything is set up for the beginning of the show.

So even these are operated by us,

so if I were to push this button,

these treadmills would start going. Oh, wow.

So we're the ones controlling them.

We're the ones who break them, unbreak them, all that stuff.

So we're got to know our stuff.

Okay, so I have the most fun place

of the theater to show you.

-Where we going? -To the bowels.

♪♪

These are pictures of all the crew.

This is everybody, all the crew and cast, so that we know,

you know, who's who.

Knock, knock, Kimmy. -Hi.

-Do you mind if we... -Hi.

...take a peek in here, or are you busy?

Kimmy: Sure.

So, this is my favorite part of backstage...

Wow. ...because I think it's the most fabulous part.

These are all the angels' costumes,

so this is my little section here, and look at, like...

So that whole little square is yours?

That's all me.

Oh, my boots.

That's a half a cow right there.

Oh, wow.

Okay, now, which are the most comfortable?

None of them.

These are the least comfortable.

Okay, that was gonna be my next question.

For obvious reasons.

These are the only ones that aren't made for me.

The rest of them are, like, custom-made by hand.

Why is it that the most uncomfortable thing

is always the best looking?

People always ask me, like,

"What's gone wrong with a show for you?"

or like, "What's a funny instance?"

So this, in the show, belongs on my backside,

and in the very, very finale,

I'm in this 2 1/2-foot tall feather hat.

You getting a picture here?

-Yeah. -Yeah.

In the finale, I had on, you know, my 6-inch heels,

and I was feeling real cute one day

and I flicked my heel up,

and it got caught in the bow unbeknownst to me,

and I went down.

It's like if a 9-foot tall drag queen falls

in front of 1,400 people... -Does anybody hear it?

...and nobody is around to see, does anyone hear it?

The answer is yes. -Yeah.

And it sounds like this, "Ah!"

Yeah.

You know, this is the second most fabulous room backstage,

and this is where the real transformation happened

between boy and girl. -Okay.

So, you know, it's one thing to have your makeup on.

It's another thing to have your makeup

and, like, a beautiful blond wig on.

Now, do you wear your mics inside the wig?

Our mics are on our heads ahead of time.

In the wig prep thing?

-Yeah. -That's really cool.

Is that comfortable? -No.

There's a lot of things that aren't comfortable

about drag, it turns out.

Come to find out.

-Come to find out. -I did it once.

-But it sure is pretty. -I found the same thing.

Yeah. So I wonder how many wigs are here?

This is a lot. -A lot.

Wigs.

Nice ones, real human hair. -Real human hair.

-Lace front. -Lace front.

Yes.

Okay, so speaking of wigs, you have to put one on.

-Yeah. These belong on my head. -Or many.

Right now. -Now.

So you have to go do your show.

Thank you so much for doing this.

We love you. -I love you.

-You're amazing. -Thank you.

2,000 shows, never looked better,

skin so supple, so fresh...

-Thank you. -...young.

If I could do a high kick right now,

I would, but I can't.

Oh, I can. Okay, cool.

Cool. All right. Have a great show.

You are hired. Yay! I'm in "Kinky Boots" now!

♪ I'm past patiently waiting ♪

♪ I'm passionately smashing every expectation ♪

Today, we're at the Richard Rogers Theatre,

home of the smash Broadway hit "Hamilton."

♪ For the first time I'm thinking past tomorrow ♪

♪ And I am not ♪

The show tells the story of Alexander Hamilton

who drastically changed the course of American history.

♪ Hey, yo, I'm just like my country ♪

♪ I'm young, scrappy, and hungry ♪

♪ And I'm not throwing away my shot ♪

"Hamilton" has revolutionized the modern American musical.

♪ We going to rise up ♪

♪ Time to take a shot ♪

Lin-Manuel Miranda's artistic contributions

have garnered countless accolades,

including a Pulitzer Prize.

♪ Rise up, it's time to take a shot ♪

Today we're hanging with Tanairi Sade Vazquez.

She's in the ensemble

in one of the biggest hits of Broadway history.

♪ Not throwing away my ♪

♪ Not throwing away my shot ♪

Ah. Tanairi! Hi, baby.

-Hello. -How are you?

How was the show? -I'm so good.

-Oh, it was so good. -Did you nail it?

-I nailed it. -That's it.

That's what I like to hear. -The audience was amazing.

And what do you want to do between shows today?

I want to eat first.

Oh, my God. I want to eat so bad.

-We got to eat. -Where we going?

-We're gonna go to Samba. -Okay.

It's, like, one of my favorite restaurants in the area.

Perfect. I'll follow you.

-So let's go. -Let's do it.

What does that feel like, to be in a show

that means so much to so many people?

Oh, my God.

It's such an honor... -Yeah.

...to, like, be a part of this show,

tell this story every night,

about one of our Founding Fathers.

Yeah.

And, like, we kind of, like, represent immigrants,

you know, like --

-Yeah. -Hamilton was an immigrant.

He came from the Caribbean to New York...

Right. ...and, like, fought for what he believed in

and made all these things happen

and, like, it kind of reminds me of my family.

Mm.

You know, my mom was the first to move

for Puerto Rico to the States to work.

Wow. She was very -- like, she believed.

She's like, "I want to work in the States.

I want to have more opportunity."

-Yeah. -And then my dad came after her,

and they made it work.

So both of your parents came from Puerto Rico?

They both came from Puerto Rico, mm-hmm.

And they wanted more opportunities for their kids,

and look at you now. -Yes.

Yeah, no, they made so many sacrifices.

One of the biggest hits on Broadway.

I know. You're literally a manifestation

of all that hard work and dedication.

Exactly. It means so much to me. Those dreams.

♪♪

I want what she's having. -The Moqueca.

-Moqueca? All right. -Yes.

Times two.

So your parents are from Puerto Rico.

-Yes. -But you were born here.

I was born in Virginia, mm-hmm.

-And that's where you grew up? -That's where I grew up.

And you started dancing.

I started dancing when I was 7 at a little dance studio

called Dance Sensations Dance Center.

-Yeah. -I'll never forget it.

And then I went to Duke Ellington School of the Arts...

Yep.

...dance major, then from there, SUNY Purchase.

-Yep. -Also a dance major.

-For college? -For college.

-Okay. -I finished my freshman year...

Yeah.

...and actually my best friend, Tori,

she was, like, kind of like my agent back in the day,

and she was like,

"There's this open call for 'West Side Story.'"

She's like, "You're perfect for it, go."

Like, "You have to go." I was like, "All right."

So I went to the open call here in the city,

and then I booked it, and I was like, "Oh, my God."

And it was for the international Asian tour.

-Oh, wow. -For a year.

-And you did it for a year? -And I did it.

Like, I was like, "Bye, college."

Now, did Tori ask for her 10%?

She was like, "Girl, I'm your agent for life."

Then I started my junior year of college,

and then that was when "West Side Story"

was coming back to Broadway, the revival,

and I was working with the same choreographer, Joey McKneely.

-Okay. -So I went in.

I auditioned for Arthur Laurents and the team,

and I booked it, and that was, like, it.

So I left college to start "West Side Story."

And I'm, like, Puerto Rican,

you know, like, my family. -Yeah.

I remember watching "West Side Story,"

the movie, with my parents, and then that was my, like,

show that started my career. -Yeah.

So "West Side" is, like, my heart and soul forever.

-Same. I love that show. -Yeah.

And actually, that's how we became friends.

-I know. -You being my Anita...

-Exactly. Tony. -...me being your Tony.

But then, I think a year in "West Side Story,"

I went back to Purchase.

-Oh, wow. -And I got my degree.

That's great. Good for you.

My teachers were really amazing

and they let me graduate in a semester.

All right. So, what was the "Hamilton" audition like?

I had auditioned for the Chicago company.

At that time, I was still in "On Your Feet!" on Broadway,

and then they got back to my agent.

They were like, "Listen, like, it's not gonna

work out this time around,

but she's on the list for the Broadway company."

And I was like, "That's great, but who's gonna leave,

you know, who's gonna leave the company?"

And I was like, "You know, I'm in a show already,

'On Your Feet!'" which I was having a blast in,

and then I'd say maybe like a month and a half in,

I got the call and they're like, "Oh, there's a track open.

We would love to offer it to you."

And I was like, "What?"

It was, like, one of the most amazing, like,

feelings ever, I think. -Yeah.

It's like, "Oh, my God. Like, I kind of made it."

You started learning the show while you were performing

"On Your Feet!" at night, right? -Yes.

So explain double duty, how you did it

with "Hamilton" and "On Your Feet!"

So first off, it was for a month.

I was doing -- -Bye.

-Yeah, bye, no life. -Wow.

I was doing eight shows a week, every night,

and then rehearsing during the day...

-So much. -...learning one of the most,

I think, I believe, the hardest show I've ever learned.

-"Hamilton." -"Hamilton."

-That makes sense. -Yep.

There's a lot of lyrics in there.

A lot of lyrics. A lot of steps. A lot of dancing.

A lot of moving chairs and tables and things.

And it takes place on a turntable.

On a turntable.

So that was difficult.

That was very difficult, and also I've never been

put in a show before that's already running.

You've always started from the beginning.

Like, I've always started from the beginning,

you know, the whole, like, creating process.

So what's different? Yeah.

So that was very new for me and very difficult.

Have you ever done it before, double duty like that?

No, not like that. No.

All right. So that was delicious.

What's next? What's on the list?

Okay. Next is a vocal lesson.

-What? -How crazy is that?

I know. I'm crazy sometimes. -You are crazy.

♪♪

-Hi. -Hey.

Hello. Hi.

How are you? -Good. How are you?

-How's it going? Garen. -Garen, I'm Paul.

So nice to meet you, Paul. Thanks for having us today.

As if it's not tiring enough to do "Hamilton" twice.

Oh, my God. You're gonna do this extra work.

I love that. -Yeah.

I need to work on this. -Perfect.

I need to work on my voice and keep it ready for the show.

I mean, you must see tons of Broadway performers.

Is that right? -Oh, yeah, every day.

Every day.

How many lessons can you teach in a day?

On my worst days, I do 12.

-12? -Yeah.

And these are 45-minute sessions?

-An hour. -Okay. Wow. Unbelievable.

On a good day that I like, it's about six.

-Great, okay. -But sometimes you'll get a call

in the middle of the day for my lunch hour.

They'll say, "It's desperate.

I have a callback this afternoon."

Right. I've done that.

Yep. Need to get something ready?

-Done that before. Yep. -Yes.

Let's just start with some lip trills just

so you can kind of get... -Okay.

...get moving after all that talking.

Yes.

[ Trilling lips ]

[ Both trilling lips ]

Let's just jump in the head voice.

Okay.

And just find if you can find that core center.

[ Vocalizing ]

[ Vocalizing ]

That's great. That's great.

There's a little holding that you're doing there,

so you're getting kind of like a wider sound,

and we want to see that kind of move together in the center...

-Okay. -...so you can grow that.

You'll get the more beautiful, lush tone that you want.

[ Vocalizing ]

Yeah, that's great.

♪♪

[ Vocalizing ]

[ Vocalizing ]

That sounds great. That last one... Yeah.

...could've been a little more narrow, but otherwise...

-Great. -...you sounded great.

What's the thing that you really want to address

when you do these vocal lessons?

Just to, like, get that, like, muscle memory...

-Right. -...in my voice and, like,

use it correctly... -Right.

...because I never really studied singing,

and just get better.

-Great work today. -All right.

Thank you.

Bye. -Bye- bye.

We'll see you. Thanks, Paul.

♪♪

♪♪

Scribner: We're in the Richard Rodgers Theatre.

-Yes, we are. -This is where it happens.

-Yes, this is where it happens. -This is so exciting for me.

I know.

What was it like when your parents came to see you

in the show and sat in these seats and watched you up there?

Oh, my God. I just, like, remember stepping

on the stage and seeing my mom

in the audience, and I got so, like --

You could see her during the show?

I could, yeah.

It was special.

It was very special, and they're like,

"Oh, my God. We're so proud of you."

When I started dancing,

they actually would clean the studios at night

so that I could, like, take class.

I love that.

When my -- I know.

I get emotional thinking about it

because when my parents come to see me in anything that I do,

and if I can see them in the audience and catch their eye...

Yeah, it's like, "Whew."

Yeah, it's special. -It's very special.

Now, when you were a little girl,

did you ever imagine that you'd be up here doing this?

I always knew that I wanted to dance.

I wanted to be in New York.

I wanted to be on Broadway, and I never, like, doubted that.

Yeah.

I just, like, went for it, worked hard,

and having my parents being so supportive was,

like, you know, icing on the cake, so...

-That's so beautiful. -Yeah.

♪♪

-This is it. Hey. -This is it.

The girls' room. -Hi, everybody.

-Hi. -How's it going?

This is my little station...

-This is so cute. -...right here.

Isn't it cute? -I love it.

Okay, so I'm noticing how incredibly clean

and organized it is.

-Yeah. -Don't -- Don't lie.

Is this how it always is? -No.

-Uh-huh. -It's not.

Cleaned up a little bit for today?

I had to clean it up a little bit.

'Cause I'm gonna ask your friends.

That's me in Puerto Rico.

-So beautiful. -One of my favorite places.

-Ma? -Mommy.

-Where do you take a nap? -[ Chuckles lightly ]

Right under here. -Underneath the table?

-I move this chair... -Yeah.

...and I lift my feet...

-Uh-huh. -...and just knock out.

We've been noticing that's a trend.

Isaac Powell slept under his sink.

-Oh, my God. -Mm-hmm.

-Wow. -Yeah.

The only bed I've seen,

Jessica Vosk had a bed that was kind of impressive.

Work.

So is it the same for all of you guys,

that your parents are just dying that you're in "Hamilton"?

-Yes. -They're dying.

My mom's seen it 11 times.

-11 times? -Oh, my God.

11 times.

All right. Are you ready to see the stage?

-I am. -All right.

-Let's do it. Okay. -Let's go.

♪♪

♪♪

-I'm getting stage fright. -I know, right?

-Wow. -And here it is.

Voilà, voilà.

This is where it happens.

This is where it happens.

And we're standing on the turntables, too.

Yes.

And you have not one, but two turntables.

Two.

It's so beautifully done.

It's so beautiful, I know.

It turns into so many different things like that.

1,300 seats. -Yep.

-It seems bigger. -It does.

But it also feels like there's not a bad seat in the house.

There isn't. This is my stage, my playground.

Have you ever had any mishaps out here?

-Oh, yes. -Like what?

The turntables stopped working, and we all freaked out.

It was, like, we don't know how to dance anymore

because we're so used to dancing on it,

and we were just like...

-Live theater. -I know, live theater.

-That's the beauty of it. -We made it work, though.

-Yeah, absolutely. -We always have to.

You're doing this show eight times a week.

-Mm-hmm. -You've got your team.

You've got the cast, but certain things change.

Obviously, Lin started doing the show,

but isn't doing the show anymore.

What's it like when he comes back around

and Alex comes back around?

Vazquez: Oh, it's so -- It's awesome to see Lin.

-Yeah? -Like, he'll just show up

and he'll just hang in the stage manager office

and, like, talk to us and, like,

"How's your day? How's it going? How's life?" Does he show up alone?

Does he show up with a crew? -Alone, most of the time.

Yeah, and then Alex, when Alex comes we're like,

"Okay, our vocals have to be on point."

Yeah, got to check all that stuff.

You know, because he's very -- his ear is, like, it's crazy.

He can hear every little thing.

-"That's flat. That's sharp." -Yep, sharp, flat.

-"Fix it." -"Fix it now."

This is the theater

where Lin's other show was on Broadway, "In The Heights."

Yes, "In The Heights," one of my favorite shows.

-So he must love this theater. -Oh, yeah.

-It's a special place for him. -This is like --

I think it's gonna be named after him one day.

I don't know.

I feel like -- I just feel that for him.

♪♪

This has been so incredible, Tanairi...

It's been so fun.

...learning about what you do between shows...

Yeah. ...and seeing this incredible backstage space.

You have to do your next show. -I do.

-So I'm gonna let you go. -I sure do.

-I'm gonna say goodbye... -Oh, my God.

-...and say thank you. -It was so much fun.

-You're fantastic. -Thank you.

-Have a great show... -Thank you.

-...and we'll see you soon. -Yes.

-Okay. -All right.

-Bye. -Bye.

♪♪

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