Broad and High

S9 E5 | FULL EPISODE

Vintage Costume Restoration and Dazzling Quilts

A celebrated costume designer shares tips for restoring vintage garments. An inventive quilter creates compelling designs stitching together photographs rather than fabric. And another quilter uses a more traditional approach in her dazzling designs.

AIRED: November 18, 2021 | 0:26:46
ABOUT THE PROGRAM
TRANSCRIPT

>> PRODUCTION OF "BROAD & HIGH"

IS FUNDED IN PART BY THE GREATER

COLUMBUS ARTS COUNCIL.

SUPPORTING ARTS, ADVANCING

CULTURE, AND CONNECTING THE

COMMUNITY TO ARTISTS, EVENTS,

AND CLASSES AT COLUMBUSARTS.COM.

♪♪

♪♪

>> THIS TIME ON "BROAD & HIGH."

A CELEBRATED COSTUME DESIGNER

SHARES TIPS FOR RESTORING

VINTAGE GARMENTS.

>> I WILL HAVE TO TAKE THE WHOLE

THING APART AND LINE THE ENTIRE

THING TO GIVE IT STRENGTH.

>> AN INVENTIVE QUILTER CREATES

COMPELLING DESIGNS, STICKING

TOGETHER PHOTOGRAPHS RATHER THAN

FABRIC.

AND, ANOTHER QUILTER USES A MORE

TRADITIONAL APPROACH IN HER

DAZZLING DESIGNS.

THIS AND MORE, RIGHT NOW ON

"BROAD & HIGH."

♪♪

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>> WELCOME TO "BROAD & HIGH."

I'M YOUR HOST, KATE QUICKEL.

BETSEY POTTER HAS BEEN WIDELY

RECOGNIZED FOR HER WORK

RESTORING HOLLYWOOD COSTUMES.

YOU MAY HAVE SEEN SOME OF THESE

GOWNS AND DRESSES ON EXHIBIT AT

THE DECORATIVE ARTS CENTER

IN LANCASTER.

NOW'S OUR OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN

ABOUT SOME OF THE RESTORATION

TECHNIQUES THAT POTTER

INCORPORATES INTO HER WORK.

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>> BETSEY, YOU'RE A RENOWNED

COSTUME DESIGNER FOR BOTH STAGE

AND SCREEN.

CAN YOU TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT

THE CRAFT OF DESIGNING FOR THOSE

TWO MEDIUMS?

>> THERE IS A DIFFERENCE JUST --

IF YOU THINK ABOUT IT, BETWEEN

THE FACT THAT THEATRICAL

COSTUMES HAVE TO GET A DISTANCE.

THEY HAVE TO GO OUT OVER THE

SEATS, UP TO THE BALCONY.

SO, THE DESIGN OF THE CLOTHES IS

BOLDER AND BROADER.

YOU CAN'T DO LITTLE, TEENY

DETAILS.

THE MINUTE YOU MOVE INTO

TELEVISION, OR FILM, WHERE IT

GOES CLOSE IN --

TO THE FACE, TO THE NECKLINE,

ALL THOSE THINGS.

THE DETAILS BECOME MUCH MORE

IMPORTANT.

>> IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN

THE WAY THAT COSTUMES USED TO BE

MADE AND HOW THEY'RE MADE TODAY?

>> NOT REALLY, ALTHOUGH THE

STYLE OF HOW CLOTHES ARE MADE IS

DIFFERENT.

AND, THE MATERIALS WE HAVE ARE

DIFFERENT.

AND, ONE OF THE PROBLEMS I HAVE

IN RESTORING OLDER COSTUMES IS

THAT WE DON'T HAVE SOME OF THE

SAME MATERIALS TO RESTORE THEM.

BUT THE QUALITY HAS MORE

PROBABLY, TO DO WITH THE

FUNCTION OF THE COSTUMES.

THIS IS THE TOP OF AN ORIGINAL

DRESS THAT EVERYBODY LOVES.

THEY ALWAYS WANT TO RENT IT.

THEY DO RENT IT.

IT GOES OUT.

IT ENDED UP ON A MOVIE WHERE

THEY WERE DANCING IN IT.

THEY DIDN'T TELL ME THAT GOING

INTO THE MOVIE, BUT THEY'RE PART

WAY THROUGH THE MOVIE, AND THIS

BODICE STARTS TO DISINTEGRATE.

IT ACTUALLY, THE THREADS ARE

FALLING OUT BECAUSE THEY'RE

PUTTING MUCH MORE STRAIN ON IT.

SO, THEY HAVE TO FIGURE OUT HOW

WE CAN GET THROUGH THE MOVIE

WITH THIS?

SO, THEY BUILT AN UNDER BODICE

TO IT AND SENT IT BACK TO ME.

BUT I WILL HAVE TO TAKE THE

WHOLE THING APART, AND LINE THE

ENTIRE THING TO GIVE IT

STRENGTH.

AND, I WILL COPY IT AT THE SAME

TIME AND MAKE A NEW ONE.

>> SO THEN, A BIG PART OF YOUR

JOB IS TO RESTORE OLDER COSTUMES

THAT HAVE BEEN USED IN MOVIES.

SO, CAN YOU TALK ABOUT JUST --

THIS PIECE RIGHT HERE?

>> OKAY.

THIS IS JANE RUSSELL'S ORIGINAL

COSTUME FROM "SON OF PALEFACE."

♪♪

AND THIS ONE -- THE ARCHIVIST

RANDALL THROPE, CAME TO ME AND

SAID, "CAN WE RESTORE THIS FOR

DISPLAY?"

>> NOW, WHAT I DO IS RESTORE

THEM FOR DISPLAY.

I AM NOT A CONSERVATIONIST.

I RESTORE.

AND SO, IT HAD BEEN ALTERED MANY

TIMES.

AND THAT'S THE NATURE OF THE

COSTUMES.

THAT THEIR PURPOSE IS TO BE

REUSED.

AND THIS IS SILK.

IT'S BEAUTIFUL SILK.

AND, IF YOU SEE HERE, YOU CAN

SEE THE WEAR.

WELL, UP HERE THERE ARE ACTUALLY

WERE HOLES IN THE FABRIC.

SO, I HAD TO FIGURE OUT A WAY TO

COVER THIS, 'CAUSE I DO NOT

WANT TO CUT ANYTHING AWAY.

I WANT IT TO STAY ORIGINAL.

AND I GOT A RED, SILK CHARMEUSE,

AS CLOSE IN FINISH TO THE

ORIGINAL, AND THEN I DIPPED IT

TO TRY TO MATCH IT.

BECAUSE, IF YOU PUT IN A PIECE

OF FABRIC THAT DOESN'T MATCH

WHAT SHOULD BE THERE IT WILL

REFLECT THE LIGHT DIFFERENTLY

AND IT WILL LOOK LIKE A PATCH.

SO, THAT'S A BIG FACTOR.

SO I ALWAYS USE 100% THE FIBER

IF I CAN FIND IT, A NATURAL

FIBER.

EVERYTHING IS REVERSIBLE TOO.

BECAUSE, YOU DON'T CHANGE,

CUT -- MAKE IT SO THAT IT IS NO

LONGER THE ORIGINAL OUTFIT.

THE WHOLE GOAL IS TO MAKE THE

OUTFIT ON DISPLAY LOOK LIKE WHAT

THAT COSTUME DESIGNER DESIGNED

FOR THAT ACTRESS.

TO BRING IT BACK TO THE GLORY OF

WHAT IT WAS.

>> SO, WE'RE HERE AR THE

DECORATIVE ARTS CENTER OF OHIO

AND THE PARAMOUNT COLLECTION.

AND, THERE ARE SOME PIECES YOU

HELPED RESTORE HERE.

CAN YOU TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT

THOSE?

>> YES, THERE ARE ABOUT FOUR

PIECES OR MORE THAT I'VE

RESTORED.

THERE WAS A DRESS FOR

DOROTHY LAMOUR FOR A MOVIE

CALLED, "MAN ABOUT TOWN."

♪♪

IT WAS BROUGHT TO ME, AND IT HAD

BEEN PATCHED THREE TIMES

ALREADY, SO I TOOK EVERYTHING

OUT.

ALL OF THE LITTLE STITCHES.

ALL OF THE STUFF.

STEAMED IT OUT.

AND WHEN I GOT DONE, I HAD

SOMETHING THAT HAD HOLES ALL

THROUGH HERE, ALL THROUGH HERE,

AND -- WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO?

SO, I WENT INTO MY STASH OF

FABRIC, OKAY?

AND I FOUND A FABRIC THAT WAS

THE RIGHT FEEL, THE RIGHT

MOVEMENT.

THE RIGHT WEAVE, AND THE RIGHT

REFLECTION TO THE DRESS.

THEN, I HAD TO DYE IT THE RIGHT

COLOR.

SO, I DYED IT THE RIGHT COLOR.

THIS IS ALL I HAVE LEFT OF IT

BECAUSE I THOUGHT I DYED ENOUGH.

AND IT TURNED OUT THERE WAS SO

MANY HOLES, THAT I ACTUALLY USED

IT UP RIGHT DOWN TO THE SCRAPS.

SO, I PUT THESE BEHIND ALL OF

THOSE HOLES.

STITCHED THEM IN -- CAREFULLY.

THEN, USING THIS FABRIC, WHICH I

DYED ALSO TO MATCH -- I MADE AN

UNDER BODICE THAT GOES FROM THE

SHOULDER, DOWN THE FRONT,

SHOULDER, DOWN THE BACK, ALONG

THE ZIPPER.

THERE'S A ZIPPER HERE.

THERE'S A ZIPPER THERE.

AND CONNECTS ALL THE WAY DOWN TO

THE SKIRT.

SO, THE SUPPORT OF THE SKIRT AND

THE DRESS IS ON THAT 100% COTTON

UNDER BODICE.

WE LIKE THIS DRESS BECAUSE IT

HAS THESE FABULOUS BEADED WINGS

ON THE FRONT OF IT.

AND, THEY ARE THREE-DIMENSIONAL

BEADED WINGS THAT MOST OF US

HAVE NEVER SEEN DONE ANYWHERE.

AND SO, WE FELT IT WAS

WELL-WORTH THE WORK TO BRING IT

BACK TO LIFE.

♪♪

ANOTHER DRESS THAT WAS BROUGHT

TO ME FROM THE ARCHIVE.

IT LOOKS LIKE A DRESS, BUT IT'S

A SUIT.

AND, SOMEONE HAD PUT THE BOW ON

THE BACK OF THE DRESS.

THEY HAD MOVED IT AROUND.

WE HAD THE PICTURES FROM THE

DRESS.

WE HAVE THE MOVIE.

I COULD LOOK AT THE DRESS, AND

FINALLY FIGURED OUT WHERE THE

BOW WENT, AND PUT IT IN PLACE.

GET THAT DONE, AND I LOOK AT THE

TOP OF THE DRESS -- AND I CALL

HIM UP AND I SAY, "YOU DO NOTICE

THAT THE NECKLINE IS ENTIRELY

DIFFERENT."

AND THEY HADN'T REALLY NOTICED

BECAUSE THEY WERE SO FOCUSED ON

THE BOW.

SO, I TURN THE JACKET INSIDE

OUT, PUT IT BACK ON THE DRESS

FOR 'EM, AND WE WERE REALLY

LUCKY.

BECAUSE, SOMEBODY HAD HAD

RESPECT FOR THIS GARMENT.

THEY HAD NOT CUT THE FABRIC

'CAUSE MOST OF THE TIME -- WHEN

YOU RENT CLOTHES IT VERY

SPECIFICALLY SAYS, "YOU MAY

ALTER, BUT YOU MAY NOT CUT."

BUT NOT EVERYBODY PAYS ATTENTION

TO THAT, RIGHT?

SO, EVERYTHING HAD BEEN FOLDED

INTO THE SIDES OF THIS COSTUME.

THERE WAS ENOUGH EXTRA FABRIC

INSIDE THE BACK SEAM TO CUT A

LITTLE BIT OUT, AND COVER THE

THREE MISSING BUTTONS THAT I

FOUND, THE RIGHT SIZE, AND PUT

THOSE IN.

AND RESTORE THE DRESS, LENGTHEN

THE SKIRT, AND GIVE IT EXACTLY

WHAT LOOKED SO FEMME FATALE ON

HER.

IT WAS GREAT.

♪♪

AND THEN, THERE'S ANOTHER

OUTFIT.

IT LOOKED PRETTY GOOD WHEN I GOT

IT -- ON THE OUTSIDE.

BUT, THE INSIDE OF IT WAS

SHREDDING.

IT WAS LINED WITH SILK TAFFETA.

AND IT WAS JUST SHREDDING ALL

DOWN THE SKIRT.

IT'S A FULL LENGTH BUSTLE DRESS

WITH A BODICE, WITH BEADS THAT

GO DOWN THE FRONT, AND IT'S

LOVELY, EXCEPT EVERY TIME YOU

PUT IT ON THE DRESS FORM, YOU

GOT ANOTHER PILE OF SHREDS

COMING OUT OF IT.

I HAD TO HUNT DOWN ENOUGH

YARDAGE TO DO IT BECAUSE IT WAS

THE PETTICOAT, AND THE COMPLETE

LINING OF THE SKIRT AND THE

BODICE HAD TO BE REDONE, AND THE

SLEEVES.

I MEAN, EVERYTHING.

AND, THE BEADS ARE TEARDROP

SHAPED AND THEY'RE DIFFERENT

SIZES AND EVERYTHING HAD TO BE

REPLACED AND SEWN BACK ON.

IT'S FUN TO BRING THEM BACK TO

LIFE, BUT THERE'S A POINT IN THE

MIDDLE -- NOTHING IS THAT MUCH

FUN.

[CHUCKLES]

WHEN YOU'RE REALLY ON A TIME

SCHEDULE, AND IT'S LIKE --

SOMEONE SAYING, "ARE YOU DONE

YET?"

>> SO WE'VE BEEN TALKING A LOT

ABOUT THE COSTUMES YOU'VE HELPED

RESTORE.

BUT, THERE'S A COUPLE COSTUMES,

AND I'M REALLY INTERESTED TO

LEARN MORE ABOUT -- FROM ONE OF

MY FAVORITE MOVIES,

"WHITE CHRISTMAS."

CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THOSE?

>> I'D BE GLAD TO TALK ABOUT

THIS.

IT'S A NUMBER CALLED "SISTERS"

FROM "WHITE CHRISTMAS."

♪♪

AND ITS ROSEMARY CLOONEY AND

VERA-ELLEN.

AND WE HAVE -- WHAT THIS LOOKED

LIKE.

WE ALL KNOW THIS.

BUT, WHAT I GOT SENT TO ME TO

THE STORE DIDN'T LOOK LIKE THAT

ANYMORE.

NOW, THIS LOOKS PRETTY GOOD.

BUT, THIS HAD HOLES IN THE LACE,

AND THE SKIRT HAD BEEN CUT OFF

THREE INCHES.

EVERY LAYER, AND THERE'S SEVEN

LAYERS TO THIS SKIRT.

VERA-ELLEN'S DRESS HAD ALSO HAD

A LITTLE BIT OF ALTERATION ON

IF YOU LOOK AT IT, THE ENTIRE

SLEEVE AND BODICE IS GONE.

AND MY PROBLEM WAS, "HOW DO I

MAKE SOMETHING OUT OF NOTHING?"

>> HMMM.

>> AND SO, YOU THINK ABOUT WHERE

YOU'RE HEADED AND WHAT YOU'RE

DOING BEFORE YOU START, AND I

CALL NEW YORK.

CALLED FRANCE, LONDON, CHINA.

TRIED TO CONTACT EVERYBODY, AND

BASICALLY -- IT CAME DOWN TO

BOTH TIME, MONEY, AND THE AMOUNT

OF FABRIC WE NEEDED.

WHICH I ONLY NEEDED LIKE, A YARD

AND A HALF.

SO -- I CAME UP WITH THE VERY

UNIQUE SOLUTION WHICH IS WHY I

LOVE CHALLENGES, AND EVERYTHING

WAS BACK ON TOOL AND I HAPPENED

TO HAVE TOOL THAT WAS EXACTLY

THE RIGHT COLOR.

I TOOK LACE FROM THE PERIOD, I

CUT IT.

REORGANIZED IT INTO THE PATTERN

OF THIS LACE.

THE RHYTHM OF THE LACE IS WHAT I

THINK OF IT AS.

THE CURVES AND SHAPES --

STITCHED IT TO THE TOOL.

THEN, I CREATED BY HAND, ALL OF

THE WEB THAT GOES BETWEEN THOSE

PIECES.

IT REALLY WAS A CHALLENGE, IT

WORKED.

AND THAT'S THE ULTIMATE THING,

IS THAT IT WORKED.

>> WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT FOR

YOU TO RESTORE VINTAGE AND TO

USE VINTAGE?

>> I WAS A HISTORY MAJOR.

AND WHEN I READ HISTORY AND

WHAT'S GOING ON, I WAS

FASCINATED BY THE CLOTHES, AND I

LOVED THE IDEA OF BEING ABLE TO

GIVE THEM ANOTHER, AT LEAST

20 YEARS OF LIFE SO THAT THEY

CAN BE USED, AND WE CAN LEARN

FROM THEM.

INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, I WAS

TALKING TO A TEACHER FROM THE

OHIO AREA -- WHO WANTED TO KNOW,

YOU KNOW -- WITH ALL THESE

STUDENTS COMING OUT WHO ALL WANT

TO BE DESIGNERS, THE FIRST THING

I WOULD SAY IS WE AREN'T ALL

GOING TO BE EDITH HEAD, OR

BOB MACKIE.

WE NEED DESPERATELY TO HAVE

PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO DO

BEADING, WHO KNOW HOW TO DO

CROCHETING, KNITTING, FOR PERIOD

CLOTHES.

YOU COULD HAVE A CAREER FOR THE

REST OF YOUR LIFE IF YOU DID A

SPECIALTY WITHIN THESE CRAFTS.

AND I ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO EXPAND

THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF WHAT THEY

COULD DO WITHIN THE ART OF

COSTUME DESIGN.

>> THIS IS SO FASCINATING.

I JUST GREW UP WITH OLD MOVIES

AND THIS HAS JUST BEEN AN

AMAZING KIND OF WALK THROUGH

HISTORY AND HOW COSTUMES WERE

MADE.

AND IT REALLY, TRULY IS AN ART

FORM.

SO, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR

SHARING SOME OF YOUR TIPS WITH

US.

>> MY PLEASURE.

♪♪

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>> VISIT THE

DECORATIVE ARTS CENTER'S WEBPAGE

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT "DISTINCTLY

PARAMOUNT" AND "A VICTORIAN

CHRISTMAS" -- TWO EXHIBITS THAT

FEATURE POTTER'S WORK.

♪♪

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♪♪

>> PICTURE THIS, A QUILTER WHO

STITCHES IN AN UNUSUAL MEDIUM.

CHRIS MERCERHILL OF COLUMBUS --

SEWS TOGETHER PHOTOGRAPHS.

ONES THAT OFTEN FEATURE ICONIC

COLUMBUS LANDMARKS.

HIS GEOMETRIC TECHNIQUE AND USE

OF THE OHIO STAR QUILTING

PATTERN RESULT IN A

KALEIDOSCOPIC PIECE OF ART THAT

COMPELS THE VIEWER TO STEP A

LITTLE CLOSER TO IDENTIFY THE

PATTERN.

LET'S SEE IF YOU CAN RECOGNIZE

THE IMAGES.

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[SEWING MACHINE]

>> HI, I'M ORIGINALLY FROM

TORONTO, CANADA.

I CAME TO THE UNITED STATES TO

GO TO GRADUATE SCHOOL, MET MY

WIFE THERE IN SOUTH CAROLINA.

WE MOVED TO ILLINOIS.

AND THEN, BACK TO OHIO 'CAUSE

IT'S CLOSER TO HOME, SO KIND OF

A CLASSIC STORY, REALLY.

♪♪

♪♪

I'VE ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN

PATTERNS, YOU KNOW.

SHAPES, SQUARES, TRIANGLES.

♪♪

SO, WHEN I SET OUT TO MAKE A

PHOTO QUILT -- A QUILT MADE OF

PHOTOS SEWN TOGETHER -- I START

WITH AN IMAGE.

SO, THIS, THIS IS AN IMAGE OF --

UMM THE NORTH MARKET.

SO, I'M GONNA USE THIS PHOTO,

AND I'M GONNA MAKE ITS MIRROR

IMAGE.

FOR THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE

QUILT, I'LL CUT THESE TWO INCHES

OFF.

AND THEN, THE NEXT LAYER, I'LL

CUT ONE AND THREE QUARTERS, AND

A LITTLE BIT OFF OF HERE.

AND THEN, I MARKED IT DOWN LIKE

THIS, SO BY THE END, BY THE TOP

ROW -- I'M USING THESE.

THIS IS MY FOUR-INCH SQUARE.

SO, THE EFFECT THIS CREATES IS

FROM THE TOP, TO THE BOTTOM, THE

SOURCE IMAGE SHIFTS SLIGHTLY AND

CHANGES.

AND THESE LINES, WHICH ARE AT

YOU KNOW, ODD ANGLES REALLY LEND

THIS DIAMONDISM.

THEY INTERSECT IN REALLY

INTERESTING WAYS THAT CREATE

DIAMOND SHAPES AND POINTS AND

SPIKES.

♪♪

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>> TRADITIONAL QUILTS ARE MADE

WITH FABRIC, AND SO OFTEN, YOU

KNOW -- THE STORY IS THIS IS MY

GRANDMA'S APRON.

AND THIS IS MY

AUNT MYRTLE'S DRESS THAT SHE

WORE TO SUNDAY SCHOOL.

AND FOR ME, I CAN CAPTURE

MEMORIES THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHS.

I CAN IDENTIFY PATTERNS OR

PLACES OR THINGS, AND THEN USE

THEM IN MUCH OF THE SAME WAY,

MAKE A QUILT OUT OF THOSE,

INSTEAD OF OUT OF FABRIC.

♪♪

AND SO, IT'S ALL ABOUT, YOU

KNOW -- EXPLORING THE CITY,

FINDING INTERESTING VIEWPOINTS,

FINDING THINGS THAT REACH OUT TO

ME AS A REALLY DYNAMIC IMAGE,

AND THEN I CUT 'EM UP AND SEW

THEM TOGETHER AND SEE WHAT

HAPPENS.

♪♪

♪♪

WHEN I WAS IN ILLINOIS I STARTED

WORKING ON A PATTERN CALLED,

"LOG CABIN" WHICH IS SORT OF A

SQUARE, WITH THESE STRIPS ALL

THE WAY AROUND THAT JUST REPEAT

AND REPEAT AND REPEAT, WHICH

KIND OF GIVES YOU THE EFFECT OF

THE LOG CABIN.

AND I WAS IN THE LAND

OF LINCOLN.

WHEN I CAME TO OHIO, A LITTLE

OVER TEN YEARS AGO, YOU KNOW, I

WAS THINKING AND EXPLORING AND I

FOUND THIS OHIO STAR PATTERN,

AND SO, THE OHIO STAR PATTERN,

IT'S CALLED A NINE PATCH QUILT.

IT IS A GROUP OF PATTERNS CALLED

THAT BECAUSE THERE ARE

THREE SQUARES BY THREE SQUARES.

AND SO, THIS ONE -- FOUR OF THE

SQUARES HAVE TRIANGLES THAT SORT

OF FORM AN X, AND SO, THE THING

I LIKE ABOUT THESE IS, YOU GET

WHERE THESE FOUR TRIANGLES COME

TOGETHER, YOU GET THESE SORT OF

KALEIDOSCOPIC-Y, DIAMOND-Y

SPOTS.

AND THEN THERE'S THIS PATTERN

THAT SORT OF REPEATS; SQUARE,

TRIANGLE, SQUARE -- WHERE YOU

PUT IT NEXT TO ANOTHER BLOCK,

AND IT'S SQUARE, TRIANGLE,

SQUARE.

SO, RIGHT WHEN YOU THINK YOU'VE

DISCOVERED THE PATTERN; SQUARE,

TRIANGLE, SQUARE, THAT'S NOT A

TRIANGLE THAT IS ANOTHER SQUARE.

AND IT'S -- TO MY EYES,

COMPLICATED ENOUGH THAT YOU HAVE

TO SORT OF, LOOK TWICE TO REALLY

FIGURE IT OUT.

AND I DON'T ALWAYS FEEL LIKE,

WHEN I'M LOOKING AT IT, THAT

I'VE FIGURED IT OUT.

♪♪

ONE THING I REALLY TRY TO DO

WITH MY WORK IS TO CREATE

OBJECTS THAT YOU CAN APPRECIATE

BOTH UP CLOSE AND FROM A

DISTANCE.

SO, FROM A DISTANCE IT ALMOST

LOOKS LIKE A CARPET, OR

WALLPAPER, OR INTERESTING

SHAPES.

AND THEN, YOU GET UP CLOSE AND

YOU GO, "HEY, THERE IS A PERSON

THERE."

"THEY'RE WALKING DOWN THE ISLE,

IS THAT THE NORTH MARKET?"

AND YOU KIND OF LOOK AND GO,

"THAT'S THE NORTH MARKET!"

♪♪

♪♪

I LOVE FABRIC QUILTS.

I MAKE FABRIC QUILTS.

MY WIFE AND I MAKE FABRIC QUILTS

TOGETHER, BUT FOR ME, THERE'S

SOMETHING ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHS, AND

SEWING THEM TOGETHER AND I

GUESS -- MAYBE IT'S THE

RESOLUTION, THE CLARITY OF THE

GIVEN PHOTOGRAPH THAT REALLY

SETS IT APART FROM FABRIC.

♪♪

I THINK MY WORK IS SORT OF,

ABOUT NOTICING THE BEAUTY AROUND

US, AND SORT OF STOPPING AND

PAUSING AND APPRECIATING IT, IN

A WAY MAYBE WE HADN'T BEFORE.

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>> FOR A MORE TRADITIONAL

APPROACH TO QUILTING, LET'S TURN

TO JUDY HOLLEY.

THIS LOUISIANA WOMAN HAS BEEN

QUILTING SINCE SHE WAS A

TEENAGER, AND SHE'S KNOWN FOR

HER VIBRANT DESIGNS AND

PATTERNS.

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>> IN 1998, I HAD A QUILT THAT

WON FIRST PLACE AS IN EVERY SHOW

IT WAS IN, INCLUDING THE ONE

IN NEW ORLEANS.

AND THEN, THE MID-ATLANTIC QUILT

FESTIVAL, AND THEN

WILLIAMSBURG VIRIGINA, AND THEN,

AT ALSO IN HOUSTON AT THE

INTERNATIONAL QUILT FESTIVAL

THERE TOO.

>> RASPBERRY PARFAIT IS A

NEW YORK BEAUTY BLOCK.

AND, IT'S SOMETHING I ALWAYS

WANTED TO TRY AND I WAS AT A

FABRIC STORE, AND I SAW SOME

'30s PRINTS ON SALE.

THAT'S ALWAYS A GOOD EXCUSE TO

BUY SOMETHING.

BUT -- ONE OF THE PRINTS ON SALE

LOOKED EXACTLY LIKE THE FABRIC

THAT WAS IN MY MOTHER'S KITCHEN

WHEN SHE BOUGHT THIS OLD

'30s HOUSE IN

CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI.

IT LOOKED LIKE THE CURTAINS WE

TOOK DOWN.

AND SO, I BOUGHT THAT, AND I

BOUGHT SOME FRIENDS THAT THEY

WERE ON SALE.

AND FOR ABOUT A YEAR, I KINDA

GATHERED UP ALL OF THIS FABRIC

THAT WAS DEPRESSION ERA,

'30s TYPE PRINTS.

AND SO, I MADE HER A NEW YORK

BEAUTY QUILT OUT OF THOSE

DEPRESSION ERA PRINTS FOR HER

'30s HOUSE.

WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE NEW YORK

BEAUTY BLOCKS, AND YOU SEE ALL

OF THE POINTS, I ACTUALLY CUT

STRIPS, AND PAY-PER-PIECE, SO

I'M NOT CUTTING OUT LITTLE

PIECES, I'M MAKING THEM FROM

STRIPS.

AND, I JUST CUT AS I GO.

THAT IS WHAT'S CALLED AN "OFFSET

LOG CABIN."

I'M ATTRACTED TO CURVE DESIGNS

AND WHEN YOU DO AN "OFFSET LOG

CABIN" YOU CAN ACTUALLY DO

CIRCLES WITH IT IF YOU CHOOSE

TO.

I CHOSE TO DO A CLAMSHELL

PATTERN WITH IT, AND AT THE

TIME -- MY SON WAS LIVING

IN JAPAN, SO I WAS COLLECTING

JAPANESE PRINTS.

IT WAS JUST A GOOD EXCUSE TO BUY

FABRIC.

AND SINCE HE LIVED IN JAPAN I

BOUGHT JAPANESE PRINTS AND MADE

THAT QUILT.

THE "RAILROAD THROUGH

THE ROCKIES" PATTERN IS ANOTHER

WAY THAT I CAN USE A NEW YORK

BEAUTY BLOCK.

AND IT WAS TRADITIONALLY, GAVE

YOU A BROAD OPEN SPACE THAT

REPRESENTED THE PLAINS AS THE

RAILROAD WENT ACROSS THE

COUNTRY.

NICE PLACE TO HAND QUILT, OR TO

SHOWCASE YOUR QUILTING.

SO I DECIDED TO USE MY NEW YORK

BEAUTY BLOCK IN THAT KIND OF

SETTING AND I HAD BOUGHT AN

AUSTRALIAN PRINT FOR THE BORDER.

I TAUGHT A LOT OF QUILT CLASSES

FOR PROBABLY 25 YEARS.

THROUGHOUT THE GULF COAST AREA,

MOSTLY.

I STARTED SEWING AT 16.

I WAS IN A GIRLS TRIO FOR

SEVERAL YEARS AND WE HAD ALL OF

OUR DRESSES ALIKE AND I LIKED MY

TRIO CLOTHES.

I DIDN'T LIKE THE ONES THAT WERE

STORE BOUGHT.

SO I LIKED GOING TO STORE AND

PICKING THE PATTERN AND PICKING

OUT THE FABRIC.

MY MOTHER MADE MY TRIO CLOTHES,

BUT SHE DIDN'T LIKE IT.

MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A DEPRESSION

ERA QUILTER, AND HER QUILTS WERE

ALL OVER HER HOUSES.

BUT SHE WAS OLD, BY THE TIME I

CAM ALONG AND I NEVER ACTUALLY

SAW HER QUILTING.

SHE TALKED ABOUT IT, WE SLEPT

UNDER THE QUILTS AND AT ONE

POINT WHEN WE LIVED IN HER

HOUSE, HER QUILTING FRAME HUNG

OVER MY BED.

SUSPENDED FROM THE CEILING.

I NEVER A SAW A QUILT IN IT.

AND I NEVER SAW ANYBODY USING

IT.

I KNEW WHAT IT WAS FOR AND I

ALWAYS SAID ONE DAY I AM GOING

TO MAKE A QUILT.

WHEN I WAS 16 I TOOK THE MONEY I

GOT FROM MY BIRTHDAY AND I LIVED

IN CONNECTICUT AT THE TIME.

RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE

TEXTILE INDUSTRY.

I WENT TO ONE OF LOCAL MILLS, I

BOUGHT FABRIC AND EVERYTHING I

NEEDED AND SHUT MYSELF UP IN MY

BEDROOM WITH A SEWING MACHINE.

AND WHEN I CAME OUT I HAD A

DRESS.

I'VE BEEN SEWING EVER SINCE.

I MADE MY FIRST QUILT RIGHT

AFTER MY SON WAS BORN.

THEN I JUST KIND OF PLAYED

AROUND AT IT.

I DIDN'T ACTUALLY -- FOLLOW

DIRECTIONS, I JUST DID MY OWN

THING.

AND I DID THAT FOR ABOUT

15 YEARS AND FINALLY I DECIDED I

WASN'T PROGRESSING.

I WAS GOING TO PICK A PATTERN,

ACTUALLY READ THE DIRECTIONS AND

START VERY TRADITIONALLY AND DO

A TRADITIONAL BLOCK, AND

SOMETHING LIKE.

THE FIRST BOOK I BOUGHT, I

BOUGHT IN 1970.

IT WAS THE ONLY BOOK STILL IN

PRINT ON QUILTING.

IT WAS PUBLISHED IN 1949, IT'S

BY MARGUERITE ICKIS, IT'S OVER

THERE ON THE SHELF.

I WORK WITH A LOT OF TRADITIONAL

PATTERNS AND I HAVE A QUILT

PROGRAM, THAT'S ELECTRIC QUILT.

A LOT OF TRADITIONAL PATTERNS IN

THERE.

YOU CAN ALSO DRAFT YOUR OWN

PATTERNS IN THERE.

AND THEN, YOU CAN PRINT OUT ANY

BLOCK IN ANY SIZE THAT YOU NEED.

I WORK ON THE COMPUTER A LOT.

I DON'T REALLY DESIGN THAT MUCH

ON THE COMPUTER.

I DO SOME, A LITTLE BIT.

BUT I LIKE DESIGNING AT THE

DESIGN WALL.

I LIKE THE FABRIC TO TELL ME

WHAT TO DO.

ORIGINALLY, I PIECED BY MACHINE

AND I QUILTED BY HAND, AND I DID

QUILT BY HAND FOR QUITE A FEW

YEARS.

AND YOU FINALLY GET TO THE POINT

YOU'RE NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO

FINISH ALL THESE QUILTS.

HAND QUILTING TAKES A WHILE.

I'VE DECIDED TO LEARN TO QUILT

ON A DOMESTIC MACHINE.

AND -- A LOT OF PEOPLE NOW USE A

BIG LONG PROFESSIONAL LONG ARM.

I DIDN'T EVEN KNOW WHAT THAT

WAS, WHEN I WAS LEARNING HOW TO

QUILT.

SO, BY THE TIME I WAS AWARE OF

WHAT LONG ARMS WERE AND WHAT

THEY COULD DO, I HAD ALREADY

MASTERED QUILTING ON A DOMESTIC

MACHINE.

SO -- I HAVE NO DESIRE TO

CHANGE.

THE JUKI ACTUALLY IS AN

INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH MACHINE, BUT

THE BATTING DOESN'T REALLY CAUSE

MUCH OF AN ISSUE.

SOMETIMES, THERE'S A LOT OF BULK

IN THE SEEM ALLOWANCES THAT YOU

HAVE TO SEW OVER.

BUT IT'S NOT AN ISSUE WITH THE

JUKI.

I HAD ONE MACHINE THAT IF YOU

WEREN'T USING THE EXACT NEEDLE

SPECIFIC FOR THAT TECHNIQUE OR

THAT FABRIC, IT WOULDN'T SEW.

MOST MACHINES AREN'T THAT

PERSNICKETY.

I DO USE PREDOMINANTLY COTTON.

MEN'S SHIRTS ARE GREAT.

I DO MAKE QUILTS FROM DEAD

PEOPLE'S CLOTHES OFTEN.

USUALLY THAT'S FOR FAMILY

MEMBERS.

WHEN I MADE A QUILT FOR THE

FAMILY AND HE HAD BEAUTIFUL

SHIRTS, 100% COTTON, HIGH

QUALITY.

THEY WANTED THEIR QUILT, AND I

GOT TO KEEP THE REST OF IT.

AND I LIKE USING WOVEN FABRIC.

I AM ADVENTUROUS.

I WILL STILL USE OTHER FABRICS.

I COLLECT TIES AND PEOPLE JUST

GIVE THOSE TO ME.

THEIR PREDOMINANTLY SILK, BUT

THEY CAN BE ACETATE, THEY CAN BE

POLYESTER.

THEY CAN BE WOOLEN, SILK BLENDS.

THEY CAN BE COTTON.

SO YOU'RE PUTTING THEM ALL

TOGETHER.

YOU HAVE TO WASH IT IN COLD

WATER AND NOT PUT IT IN A DRYER.

I HAVE A QUILT IN THE FRONT MADE

FROM JAPANESE BOUQUETS.

IF YOU'RE WORKING NONSTOP ON A

PROJECT, I MADE A QUILT FOR MY

BOSS IN ABOUT TWO WEEKS.

FOUR TO EIGHT HOURS A DAY.

THAT WAS MAYBE TWIN SIZE.

A LARGE LAP OR TWIN.

QUILTING IS COMPULSIVE AND ONCE

YOU START IT'S SOMETHING LIKE

YOU NEED TO DO OR YOU HAVE TO

DO.

AND I PROBABLY SEW SOME

EVERYDAY.

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>> THANK YOU FOR BEING WITH US

FOR AN EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING

AND QUILTS ON THIS EDITION OF

"BROAD & HIGH."

YOU CAN FIND ALL OF OUR STORIES

ONLINE AT WOSU.ORG.

AS WELL AS ON OUR FREE MOBILE

APP.

FOR ALL OF US HERE AT WOSU, I AM

ARE

KATE QUICKEL.

THANKS FOR WATCHING.

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>> MAGGIE SMITH, POET.

I WRITE ABOUT MEMORY,

MOTHERHOOD, MORTALITY, LOSS, AND

MYTH.

MANY OF MY POEMS ARE GROUNDED

IN OHIO AND IN THE LANDSCAPE OF

THE MIDWEST.

LIKE A MAGPIE, A BIRD WHO

COLLECTS ANY SMALL, GLITTERING

BOBBLE THAT CATCHES ITS EYE.

I SEE, OR HEAR, OR READ THINGS

THAT INTEREST ME ALL THE TIME.

♪♪

THE BALANCE OF MYSTERY AND

CLARITY IN A POEM IS ALWAYS

TRICKY.

IF I SCRUB ALL THE STRANGENESS

AND WILDNESS, AND AMBIGUITY OUT

OF IT, I CAN REVISE THE LIFE

RIGHT OUT OF A POEM IF I AM NOT

CAREFUL.

I AM MAGGIE SMITH.

POETRY IS MY ART AND THERE'S NO

PLACE I'D RATHER MAKE IT.

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>> PRODUCTION OF "BROAD & HIGH"

IS FUNDED IN PART BY THE GREATER

COLUMBUS ARTS COUNCIL.

SUPPORTING ARTS, ADVANCING AND

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY TO

CULTURAL EVENTS, ARTISTS, AND

CLASSES AT

COLUMBUSMAKESARTS.COM.

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