Week in Short: 2,000-year-old cat drawing found etched at Peru’s Nazca Lines site and more

Week in Short: 2,000-year-old cat drawing found etched at Peru’s Nazca Lines site and more

This week’s art stories, in short.

  • A 2,000-year-old, 120-foot figure resembling a cat was found etched among southern Peru’s Nazca Lines, a collection of geoglyphs (or large designs) cast into the soil. The hillside feline was found by workers remodeling the UNESCO World Heritage site.

“The figure was barely visible and was about to disappear due to its location on a fairly steep slope and the effects of natural erosion,” the Peru Ministry of Culture said in a statement. “In the last week, cleaning and conservation of the geoglyph was carried out, which shows the figure of a feline represented with the body in profile and the head in front, whose lines were mostly well defined by a line of variable width between 30 and 40 centimeters.”

Other geoglyphs at the site depict a spider, monkey and hummingbird. The discovery of the feline marks the oldest to be found in the area. [Vice]

  • Antiques Roadshow was not impressed by a man who brought in a Banksy stencil to be appraised. The item in question was wiggled loose from a seaside wall sometime in 2004, according to the man (who some are speculating may have been planted by Banksy.)

“I think the message here is that, if you do see a piece of graffiti art out there, leave it, leave it for the public,” Rupert Mass, the show’s host, said. “I’m not lecturing you. I’m just saying, without that certificate, it’s just very difficult to sell. With it, it might be worth £20,000. Without it, you’re nowhere.” [Artnet News]

  • In related Banksy news, the street artist’s painting “Show Me the Money,” (2005), was sold for $9.8 million at Sotheby’s “Modernités/Contemporary” auction Wednesday. [Forbes]
  • A local visitor to the Met Museum’s Jacob Lawrence exhibition spotted a long-lost painting she recognized in her neighbors’ apartment. [ALL ARTS]
  • Archivists are working to shed light on forgotten women ghost-story writers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. [The Guardian]
  • With many arts institutions facing a reckoning, writer Carolina A. Miranda uses curator and art critic Maurice Berger’s 1990 essay “Are Art Museums Racist?” as a springboard to tackle how museums have (and haven’t) changed. [Los Angeles Times]
  • Deana Lawson was named the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize winner, marking the first time a photographer has taken the title. [ALL ARTS]
Deana Lawson, "Mama Goma, Gemena," DR Congo, 2014. Pigment print. © Deana Lawson, courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York; and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.
Deana Lawson, “Mama Goma, Gemena,” DR Congo, 2014. Pigment print. © Deana Lawson, courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York; and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

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Top Image: Peru Ministry of Culture, Communication and Image Office.