NYC dancers rise up for a ‘hyper-local dance out’ after months of isolation

NYC dancers rise up for a ‘hyper-local dance out’ after months of isolation

On Saturday, we dance!

At 5 p.m. Eastern on Oct. 3, a slew of professional dancers will take to parks, windows, streets and rooftops across New York City to perform. Their goal is to focus “public attention on an industry that remains largely on pause due to COVID.”

Declared a “hyper-local dance out,” the event will take place in all five boroughs (plus some locales outside of the city) and is organized by Dance Rising Collective — a newly formed group of artists and administrators created in partnership with Kinesis Project dance theater. A previous performance took place Oct. 1 as part of the “Dance Rising: NYC” event.

Remi Harris. Photo courtesy Dance Rising Collective.
Remi Harris. Photo courtesy Dance Rising Collective.

“After months of social isolation, economic shutdown and pause for our industry, professional dancers are rising up,” Melissa Riker, director of Kinesis Project and Jill Sigman of ThinkDance, said in a statement. “We practice a myriad of dance styles, and are of many races, gender identities, mixed abilities and body types. We are dancing to be seen, considered and spark crucial conversations about the future of dance in NYC.”

Anyone who identifies as a professional dancer, choreographer or teacher is invited to take part and can sign up on the Dance Rising Collective website. Those who register their intent before 10 a.m. on Saturday will be added to a map showing where dance actions will take place.

Movement of the People Dance Company. Solana Hoffmann-Carter. Photo by JPG.
Movement of the People Dance Company. Solana Hoffmann-Carter. Photo by JPG.

Performances will be filmed (the website asks those who sign up to make a recording) and will be projected in public spaces throughout the city later this fall.

“We dance in the wake and the waves of multiple pandemics, and in doing so insist that our dancing communities must be supported,” said Maura Nguyen Donohue, a writer, performer, curator and CUNY Hunter professor. “Behold, hold up and help us hold onto the rich diaspora that is New York City when it is dancing.”

Top Image: Photo courtesy Dance Rising Collective.