Might we recommend…6 new books we’re looking forward to reading this March

Might we recommend…6 new books we’re looking forward to reading this March

From a new memoir by Rebecca Solnit to the collected stories of Lorrie Moore, here’s what we’re reading this March.

“Temporary,” by Hilary Leichter
Available March 3
The American Dream finds humorous critique in Hilary Leichter’s debut novel, “Temporary.” Over the course of the book, Leichter’s protagonist slogs between 23 temp jobs (and 18 boyfriends) that push her life into a realm of absurdity. As the novel’s leading woman searches for “the steadiness,” the fractured reality of her life serves as commentary on late capitalism.

“Collected Stories,” by Lorrie Moore
Available March 3
A career-spanning selection of Lorrie Moore’s influential short stories are gathered and presented together for the first time. In her introduction to the collection, Lauren Groff describes Moore’s short stories as a “series of small explosions,” going on to say that the author’s voice guided her through the “blind and treacherous tunnels” one is required traverse in order to become a writer.

“Capital and Ideology,” by Thomas Piketty
Available March 10
Thomas Picketty explores sweeping inequality and the politics that lead to it in “Capital and Ideology,” a follow-up to his 2013 best-seller, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century.” Clocking in at over 1,000 pages, the French economist’s latest examines ideologies of both the past and the present to come to an understanding of our modern predicament and what might be a path toward solving it.

“New Waves,” by Kevin Nguyen
Available March 10
Weaving together meditations on the tech industry, racism and intimacy, Kevin Nguyen’s debut novel revolves around two questions: “How well do we really know one another?” and “How do we form true intimacy and connection in a tech-obsessed world?” The plot follows the friendship of Lucas and Margo, who is killed in a car accident during a heist concocted by the duo. A swarm of secrets are released after Margo’s death, leaving Lucas to suss out what he knew and didn’t know about his friend.

“My Dark Vanessa,” by Kate Elizabeth Russell
Available March 10
In Kate Elizabeth Russell’s debut novel, “My Dark Vanessa,” a relationship between 15-year-old Vanessa and her 42-year-old teacher prompts questions of consent when another former student brings allegations of sexual abuse against the instructor 17 years later. The novel moves between two timelines: Vanessa’s adolescent experience of the relationship, which she thought of as her first entry into love, and Vanessa’s vantage on the situation as an adult.

“Recollections of My Nonexistence,” by Rebecca Solnit
Available March 10
Rebecca Solnit’s memoir “Recollections of My Nonexistence” traces the development of the author’s feminist consciousness. Chronicling her time growing up in San Francisco, Solnit’s new release muses on the author’s intellectual journey and the violence facing women in various capacities.