Might we recommend…9 new books to fall in love with this February

Might we recommend…9 new books to fall in love with this February

Looking for a good read? From Jenny Offill’s anxiety-ridden “Weather” to a memoir from Diane Keaton, we’ve rounded up nine books that we’re looking forward to reading this February.

“Unfinished Business: Notes of a Chronic Re-Reader,” by Vivian Gornick
Available Feb. 4
Self-professed perpetual re-reader Vivian Gornick returns to the works that helped influence her writing. Titled “Unfinished Business: Notes of a Chronic Re-Reader,” the book begins with Gornick gulping down D. H. Lawrence’s “Sons and Lovers” for the first time and, like many other books, returning to it multiple times over the years. Revisiting works from Marguerite Duras, Colette, Elizabeth Bowen and more, the author mixes criticism, memoir and biography to create nine essays that chart her relationship with reading.

“Brother and Sister,” by Diane Keaton
Available Feb. 4
In her new memoir, actress Diane Keaton charts her relationship with her younger brother, Randy, who lived with mental illness and now suffers from dementia. Raised in Los Angeles during the 1950s, Keaton and Randy grew up close, only to — as the book describes — take divergent paths. The memoir is expressed through prose, photographs, journal entries, letters and poetry.

“In the Land of Men,” by Adrienne Miller
Available Feb. 11
When editor Adrienne Miller jumped from college to the workforce in the 1990s, she landed at GQ — a place that the author notes was “inarguably a boys’ club,” operated with “mid-century values.” By 25, Miller was made the first woman literary and fiction editor of Esquire, a feat that placed her (once again) squarely within an “indisputable cult of maleness.” In her memoir, the accomplished editor shares what it was like rising through the ranks of literary New York.

Books for February

“Weather,” by Jenny Offill
Available Feb. 11
Jenny Offill’s third novel arrives in a winking slush of anxiety. Filled with dark humor, “Weather” revolves around Lizzie Benson, a fake shrink who has a day job as a librarian. The book comes after wide-praise for her 2014 release “Dept. of Speculation,” a slim novel that surveys marriage, intimacy and longing.

“Amnesty,” by Aravind Adiga
Available Feb. 18
Aravind Adiga’s latest novel places its main character Danny, an illegal immigrant living in Australia, at the center of a quandary: provide information that could help solve a murder and risk being deported or keep what he knows to himself and face the moral consequences. Adiga is also the author of “The White Tiger,” which won the Man Booker Prize in 2008 and is slated to be made into a film starring Priyanka Chopra and Rajkummar Rao.

“The Man in the Red Coat,” by Julian Barnes
Available Feb. 18
Julian Barnes, author of the Man Booker Prize-winning novel “The Sense of an Ending,” returns to the Belle Époque in Paris to paint an eclectic portrait of the era’s artistic class. Populated by Henry James, Sarah Bernhardt, Proust and more, the tale centers on French surgeon Samuel Pozzi, the real-life subject of one of John Singer Sargent’s paintings.

Books for February

“Real Life,” by Brandon Taylor
Available Feb. 18
Set within the confines of a Midwestern university town, Brandon Taylor’s debut exposes the underlying tensions at work within his college community. Following a Black biochem student from Alabama named Wallace, the novel plunges into the barriers established within relationships to explore how trauma from childhood persists. Can’t wait for the release? Read a short story from Taylor, titled “Sussex, Essex, Wessex, Northumbria,” here.

“Norma Jeane Baker of Troy,” by Anne Carson
Available Feb. 25
Last April, Anne Carson’s “Norma Jeane Baker of Troy” debuted at the Shed, where Ben Whishaw and Renée Fleming performed the play-poem inside the institution’s 500-seat Griffin Theater. Now, the work is coming to paperback from publisher New Directions. Meditating on the “destabilizing and destructive power of beauty,” the book unites Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jean) and Helen of Troy to examine how we tell women’s stories.

“Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning,” by Cathy Park Hong
Available Feb. 25
Poet Cathy Park Hong combines memoir and cultural criticism to speak about race in America as the daughter of Korean immigrants. Told with humor and insight, the new release charts the author’s relationship to identity, family, gender, friendships, art, politics and more.