Might we recommend…10 new books to read this January

Might we recommend…10 new books to read this January

From stories by Zora Neale Hurston to a tech industry memoir, here’s what we’re looking forward to this January.

“Why We Can’t Sleep: Women’s New Midlife Crisis,” by Ada Calhoun
Available Jan. 7
After midlife crisis prompted writer Ada Calhoun to explore why she was not content, she found that there were a host of seemingly similar ailments plaguing other Gen X women. Her subsequent conversations with women across the country revealed to Clahoun that her peers were “exhausted, terrified about money, under-employed and overwhelmed.” Her book takes a deeper look at why this is.

“The Magical Language of Others,” by E. J. Koh
Available Jan. 7
Told through letters from mother to daughter, “The Magical Language of Others” is a trenchant and sometimes aching memoir from a woman grappling with her own family’s separation. After living in the U.S. for a decade, the parents of 15-year-old Eun Ji return to South Korea for work, leaving their daughter and young son behind. After Eun Ji finds her mother’s letters hidden in a box years later, the rediscovery opens the door for the Eun Ji to reevaluate her past and the complexity of forgiveness.

“Long Bright River,” by Liz Moore
Available Jan. 7
Set in a Philadelphia neighborhood ravaged by the opioid crisis, “Long Bright River” follows two sisters who chose wildly different paths. Kacey is caught in the crosshairs of addiction and lives on the streets, while Mickey works as a beat cop and patrols the same area in hopes of cleaning it up. After Kacey disappears, and a mysterious slate of murders take place in her district, Mickey becomes obsessed with finding both the murderer and her sister.

“Martha Stewart’s Organizing: The Manual for Bringing Order to Your Life, Home and Routines,” by Martha Stewart
Available Jan. 7
‘Tis the season of new beginnings and earnest resolutions. For those looking for a place to start, Martha Stewart’s latest release promises to help organize, declutter and simplify through handy room-by-room advice.

“Cleanness,” by Garth Greenwell
Available Jan. 14
Hinging on themes of violence and love, “Cleanness” opens up doors for reflection and seduction. Expanding the world laid out in the author’s debut novel, “What Belongs to You,” the book finds its unnamed narrator coming to terms with his past as he prepares to leave his post teaching literature in Sofia, Bulgaria.

“Hitting a Straight Lick With a Crooked Stick,” by Zora Neale Hurston
Available Jan. 14
Gathered for the first time, a new collection of stories from the late Zora Neale Hurston weaves together tales of love, race, class and gender. Among the works included from the “Their Eyes Were Watching God” author are eight recently unearthed writings that center on Harlem.

“Little Gods,” by Meng Jin
Available Jan. 14
A fierce story of migration that spans time and borders, “Little Gods” is a gripping read about a daughter in search of her mother’s obscure history. When Su Lan, a brilliant physicist, dies, her daughter Liya treks to China in search of the life her mother abandoned. What she discovers will influence her memory, her history and her sense of self.

“Uncanny Valley,” by Anna Weiner
Available Jan. 14
Following a stint in publishing, Anna Weiner moved from New York City to San Francisco, where she began to chisel out a career in the booming tech industry. In her memoir, Weiner charts this transition, elucidating the more insidious consequences of the digital era along the way.

“A Long Petal of the Sea,” by Isabel Allende
Available Jan. 21
Backdropped by the fallout of the Spanish Civil War, “A Long Petal of the Sea” traces the lives of two refugees — a pregnant widow and her deceased love’s brother — as they enter into an unwanted marriage and retreat to Chile to live in exile. As war breaks out across Europe, the duo grows closer, redefining their notions of home.

“American Dirt,” by Jeanine Cummins
Available Jan. 21
One of 2020’s most-hyped titles, “American Dirt” follows a mother and her son on a journey to cross the United States border after they’re forced to leave their middle-class life in the Mexican city of Acapulco.