Might we recommend…10 new books to read this November

Might we recommend…10 new books to read this November

From essays on mental health to a story that connects two generations through time, here’s what we’re looking out for this November.

The More or Less Definitive Guide to Self-Care,” by Anna Borges
Available Nov. 1
Those unfamiliar with the work of Anna Borges, senior health editor at SELF, may recognize her viral essay for The Outline, “I’m am not always very attached to being alive,” or her popular BuzzFeed article, “Self-Care: An A to Z Guide.” Structurally similar to the latter, her new book culls the advice of experts in the field along with 200 tips for self-care, creating a practical guide for dealing with life.

In the Dream House,” by Carmen Maria Machado
Available Nov. 5
Carmen Maria Machado, author of “Her Body and Other Parties: Stories,” writes with crystalline clarity about the murky transformation of a dream relationship into a nightmare scenario. Set largely in Bloomington, Indiana, Machado’s memoir charts the development and unraveling of a cross-state love that becomes infected with violence. “In the Dream House” serves as an entry into the slim canon of stories about queer domestic abuse, scattering bits of historical details and notes in with Machado’s personal story.

The Crying Book,” by Heather Christle
Available Nov. 5
Have you cried lately? Author Heather Christle tackles the subject of tears, opting for a scientific and personal examination of the biological response. Glinting from one subject to the next, the book weaves the author’s own backstory with historical anecdotes.

The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness,” by Susannah Cahalan
Available Nov. 5
Using a 1973 study called “On Being Sane in Insane Places,” spearheaded by psychologist David Rosenhan, Susannah Cahalan’s new book examines the history (and flaws) of the mental health industry. The author’s first book, “Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness,” chronicled her experience of being hospitalized for an autoimmune disease that was initially misdiagnosed as schizophrenia disorder. Turning the gaze, her latest focuses on the doctors and institutions that provide the diagnosis.

The Revisioners,” by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton
Available Nov. 5
Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s second book tells a story of two relatives connected by lineage but divided by over a century’s worth of time: Ava, a mixed-race, single mother, and Josephine, a former enslaved woman who became a thriving landowner. Though Ava and Josephine are of different generations, both plot-lines find the women contending with racism.

Little Weirds,” by Jenny Slate
Available Nov. 5
It’s been a busy fall for comedian Jenny Slate, whose new book “Little Weirds” arrived on the heels of her comedy special “Stage Fright.” Packaged as a collection of essays, tied together by Slate’s characteristic curiosity, the book creates a bouquet of topics that range from depression to a “French-kissing rabbit.”

The Witches Are Coming,” by Lindy West 
Available Nov. 5
Lindy West, author of the memoir-turned-TV-show “Shrill,” presents a cultural critique that examines the current political landscape through her own experience growing up as a woman in the United States. Using pop culture as a jumping off point, West winds her way through memes, media and men through 17 essays.

The Mutations,” by Jorge Comensal
Available Nov. 12
What happens when the trait that you are known for threatens to slip away? Billed as a comedy, Jorge Comensal’s novel follows the life of spit-fire lawyer Ramón Martinez, who is diagnosed with tongue cancer.

Essays: One,” by Lydia Davis
Available Nov. 12
In a piece titled “A Beloved Duck Gets Cooked,” Lydia Davis says that while her books oftentimes find their way into the poetry section, she sees herself as a “writer of fiction.” This work about form and literary beginnings sits in conversation with a group of essays, commentaries and lectures written by the short story master over the past five decades. “Essays: One” is the first of a two-volume collection.

Incidental Inventions,” by Elena Ferrante
Available Nov. 19
Rather than printing out every Elena Ferrante article written for her Guardian column, sweep them up all at once in a tidy book form. Punctuated with illustrations by Andrea Ucini, the collection spans topics such as climate change, what it was like seeing her novel adapted and more. (Fans of the author’s Neapolitan series are also in luck: Ferrante is set to publish her first new novel in four years in Italy Nov. 7.)